Required Courses

The table that follows outlines the sequence of required courses for the full-time Day Division and the part-time Evening Division. The basic J.D. program includes a required curriculum of the following courses: Civil Procedure; Contracts; Constitutional Law; Criminal Law; Evidence; Legal Practice I and II; Professional Responsibility; Legislation and Regulation; Property; and Torts. Additionally, students must satisfy the Writing Requirement before the final semester at the Law School. 86 credits are required for graduation.

Full-Time Day Division Program Part-Time Evening Division Program

Day and evening students are free to schedule the required courses Evidence (3) and Professional Responsibility (3) within their division, at any time after their first year.

Students whose cumulative GPA places them in the bottom 1/3 of their division at the end of their first year (full-time) or third semester (part-time) will be required to follow the Comprehensive Curriculum Program (CCP), which includes additional course requirements.

Students whose cumulative GPA places them in the bottom 25 percent of their division at the end of their second year (full-time) or third year (part-time) will be required to take New York Law in National Perspective during their next-to-last semester and Consolidated Legal Analysis during their final semester. Students whose cumulative GPA places them between the bottom 25 percent and 50 percent of their division at the end of their second year (full-time) or third year (part-time) will be required to take New York Law in National Perspective during their final semester.

Writing Requirement: Because the ability to write clearly, accurately, and persuasively is essential to the successful practice of law, the faculty has established a writing requirement beyond that of the first-year required course. The Writing Requirement must be satisfied before a student’s final semester at the Law School and may be satisfied in a variety of ways: by a substantial paper in a course; by taking an upper-class writing elective and earning a grade of B- or better; by an independent research project; by a piece prepared for the Law Review; or by a brief written in connection with intermural Moot Court competitions. Students can find detailed information on the writing requirement in the Law School’s portal under Academics.

*Day students who take Principles of Legal Analysis will take Legislation and Regulation in the spring semester of their second year. Evening students who take Principles of Legal Analysis will take Constitutional Law their third year.

To view all courses, click here.