Students

Getting Involved with the Center for International Law

The Center for International Law provides students of New York Law School with opportunities to become actively involved in and learn more about international and comparative law. Below is a listing of programs sponsored by the Center for International Law:

  • The John Marshall Harlan Scholars Program: is a rigorous academic honors program designed for New York Law School students who have performed at the top of their law school class. It gives them the opportunity to focus their law school studies, gaining depth and substantive expertise beyond a broad understanding of the law. Eligible students affiliate with one of the Law School’s six academic centers. Please click here for more information on the requirements for the Harlan Scholars in the Center for International Law.
  • The International Associates Program: provides an opportunity for students (beginning in their second year) to develop their interests in international law. Under the program, students will receive guidance in structuring an appropriate curriculum and work towards the completion of a capstone project. Students are also invited to attend lectures organized by the Center for International Law and participate in other activities.
  • Career Resources in International Law: The Center for International Law provides career information in the areas of international and comparative law. Given its limited resources, the Center (whose focus is largely academic) does not provide full-service career counseling. Instead, students should visit the homepage of the Office of Career Planning, which provides many more services, including resume workshops, interview strategies, interview scheduling, and much wider information on clerkships, internships, and other career opportunities.
  • FACEBOOK: Our Facebook page provides interesting news and information on international and comparative law, and also updates on the Center’s activities.
  • LINKEDIN: Our LinkedIn page lets you join a group to network with other New York Law School students and alumni interested in international and comparative law. But you must first create an account with LinkedIn.
  • C.V. Starr Summer Stipends in International Business Law: Through a generous grant from the Starr Foundation, the Center for International Law will grant summer stipends to a limited number of students to pursue summer internships in the area of international business law. Click here for application procedures. The deadline for submitting the application for funding in summer 2014 is April 17, 2014.
  • Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition: is the largest moot court competition in the world, and New York Law School has long participated in the Jessup competition. Try-outs for the team are open to 2L and 3L students only. Click here for try-out procedures for the 2013-14 team.
  • Willem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot: allows students to research and write a legal memorandum on a particular issue in international commercial arbitration and then compete in oral arguments held in Vienna, Austria — all under the supervision of Center faculty. For the team from New York Law School, the Vis competition is a year-long project-based learning course (two credits per semester) taught and coached by Prof. Lloyd Bonfield. Click here for more information.
  • London Summer Study Abroad Program: provides students with an opportunity to study abroad in London, England (in conjunction with Queen Mary College, University of London) where they take courses in International Lawyering Business and Real Estate Practicum, EU Law, and International Financial Services Law, among others. Click here for more information.
  • Semester Abroad Program in the Netherlands: allows students to study abroad for one semester at the Faculty of Law at Radboud University located in the city of Nijmegen in the Netherlands. New York Law School will select two students from a pool of applicants every year. Spending a semester at Radboud will give students access to courses unavailable at many U.S. law schools and permit them to take similarly titled courses (for example, International Law, International Business Transactions, or European Union Law) taught by non-Americans who may convey the subject matter from a different perspective. Click here for the application procedures.