News

July 10, 2012: New book from the Director of the Center for International Law

Bonfield_Book_CoverProfessor Lloyd Bonfield, Director of the Center for International Law, has published a new book — Devising, Dying and Dispute: Probate Litigation in Early Modern England. According to Ashgate Publishing, the book investigates, catalogs, and systematizes the legal issues that were raised in will disputes in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, the probate jurisdiction which probated wills of the more wealthy English property owners as well as some of those with a more modest quantity of property during the last half of the seventeenth century. By focusing on property law as reflected in cases of disputed wills, the book provides a glimpse at a much fuller spectrum of society than is often the case. Even people of relatively modest means were concerned to pass on their possessions, and their cases provide a snapshot of the type of objects owned and social relationships revealed by patterns of bequests.

For the full description from Ashgate Publishing and information on how to order a copy, click on this link.

January 10, 2011: Center partners with American Society of International Law

ASIL_Academic_Partnership_logoNew York Law School has joined the Academic Partnership Program of the American Society of International Law (the nation’s leading educational membership organization fostering the study of international law) which will allow the Center for International Law to promote its activities and programs. Click on the image below for more information on this program.

 

 

 

 

November 23, 2010: Welcome the Center’s new director

Bonfield_ConeCenter director and professor Sydney M. Cone, III, will be retiring from the full-time faculty of New York Law School on January 3, 2011. On that date, he will become Emeritus C.V. Starr Professor of Law and Emeritus Director of the Center for International Law. In his place, Professor Lloyd Bonfield will become the Center’s new director. A former director of international programs at Tulane Law School, Professor Bonfield has been a driving force behind the Law School’s new summer abroad program in London, and is also working on a proposal for a new LL.M. program for non-U.S. students.

Professor Cone joined the Law School’s faculty in 1996 as the first C.V. Starr Professor of Law and as founder and director of the Center for International Law. Under his leadership, the Center created exciting programs for its Harlan Scholars and International Associates, and invited a long list of distinguished speakers, including a Nobel laureate.

September 9, 2009: Center newsletter wins major award

The International Review was awarded the 2009 Gold Award for “Most Improved Editorial (Print Newsletter)” in the Sixth Annual Magnum Opus Awards. Managed by Content-Wise in conjunction with the Missouri School of Journalism, the Magnum Opus Awards is “the leading custom publishing awards program recognizing excellence in editorial content, design, and strategy.” According to the awards program, The International Review, which marked its 10-year anniversary this past spring, “stood out as among the best in custom publishing.”

A panel of publishing professionals and professors from the Missouri School of Journalism judged the competition, which included almost 600 entries. Other award winners include The Walt Disney Company, Toyota, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Deloitte, LLP. (Last year, New York Law School Magazine also received an award in the category of “Most Improved Editorial.”)

The International Review is the only academic newsletter published by an ABA-accredited law school that reports on a wide range of contemporary international and comparative law issues. Unlike similar publications whose stories are often unreadable and laden with technical and obscure jargon, the articles in The International Review are written in plain English, yet still provide information that is legally accurate.

April 21, 2009: The International Review celebrates its 10th year of publication

The recently published Spring 2009 issue of The International Review marks its 10-year anniversary.

First published in 1999 by New York Law School’s Center for International Law, The International Review is the only academic newsletter published by an ABA-accredited law school that reports on a wide range of contemporary international and comparative law issues. Unlike similar publications whose stories are often unreadable and laden with technical and obscure jargon, the articles in The International Review are written in plain English, yet still provide information that is legally accurate. This makes the newsletter’s content accessible to non-specialists in international law and even to non-lawyers and the general public.

The International Review was awarded the 2007 Gold Award for “Best Edited Organization Newsletter” by the publisher of The Newsletter on Newsletters, which TIME magazine described as “the bible of the [newsletter] industry.”

The 10-year anniversary issue (and all back issues) are available for free on the Center’s homepage.

 August 23, 2007: Center newsletter wins prestigious award

2007 Gold AwardThe International Review was awarded the 2007 Gold Award for “Best Edited Organization Newsletter” by the publisher of The Newsletter on Newsletters (NL/NL), which TIME magazine described as “the bible of the [newsletter] industry.” NL/NL is the only independent publication serving the needs of the newsletter, electronic, and specialized information industries worldwide. A distinguished panel of judges based its decision on several criteria, including whether the newsletter met the goals and needs of its readers.

The International Review began publication in the spring of 1999. Michael Rhee is the Managing Editor. The first issue was six pages in length. The latest issue (Spring 2007) was 48 pages long. Here are a few things that make our publication noteworthy:

  •  It is the only academic newsletter published by an ABA-accredited law school that reports on a wide range of contemporary international and comparative law issues. Other similar newsletters specialize only in a particular area of (or a few areas of similar topics within) international law such as human rights and the laws of war, among others;
  • Most of our stories are written in plain English, yet still provide information that is legally accurate. This makes the newsletter’s content accessible to non-specialists in international law and even to non-lawyers and the general public. In contrast, other newsletters are often laden with technical and obscure jargon that is largely inaccessible to many groups of readers;
  • Our stories try to provide sufficient background so that the reader can place the issues in a broader context. Other publications simply provide straight information (such as how an international tribunal decided a certain case) without any background; and
  • A subscription to The International Review is free, and its subscribers include every law professor and administrator in the United States who teaches or has an interest in international and comparative law.

Click here for access to The International Review newsletter archive.