Course offerings and descriptions

More information on course materials will be available in spring 2018.

 

Cybercrime

2 credits

2:00 pm – 3:40 pm

Classroom B-35

Take-home exam due by July 5, 2018, by 5:00 pm (EST)

Professor Mary Anne Franks

 

Professor Kate Klonick

Technological innovation alters the commission, definition, and conception of crime. In some cases, computers, social media, and the Internet have simply made existing criminal activity harder to detect or easier to commit. In other cases, they have created new forms of criminal activity that challenge longstanding views about the permissibility and punishment of human behavior. In exploring how technology transforms crime and how crime transforms technology, this course will address topics such as digital privacy, online freedom of speech, cyberterrorism, cybersecurity, online harassment, “revenge porn,” “ doxxing,” and identity theft. The course will examine cyber crime’s interaction with constitutional law, in particular the First and Fourth Amendments; federal criminal statutes such as the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) and the Communications Decency Act Section 230; federal and state laws relating to threats, stalking, extortion, and child exploitation; and proposed federal legislation such as the Stop Enabling Sex Trafficking Act (SESTA), the Ending Graphic Online User Harassment (ENOUGH) Act, and the Online Safety Modernization Act (OSMA).

 

International Corporate and Financial Services Law

2 credits

9:00 am – 10:40 am

Classroom B-35

Take-home exam due by July 5, 2018, by 5:00 pm (EST)

Professor Jeffrey Haas
 

Professor Faith Stevelman

This course will examine both securities regulation and corporate governance from a comparative law perspective. The first half of the course will focus on the securities law regime of the United States and that of various European countries, particularly the United Kingdom. Emphasis will be placed on public and private offerings of securities and the regulation of takeover activity.

The second half of the course is designed to support rising second year law students through an introduction to the study of Anglo-American business law, and corporate law in particular. First we will address the basic principles and structures of corporate law — most especially the role of boards of directors, corporate executive officers, and the power and limits of shareholders’ rights. Next we’ll engage in comparative legal analysis, focusing on features of UK corporate governance (including the Companies’ Act).  We will situate UK corporate governance in the history of the EU and beyond (“Brexit”). Finally, we’ll discuss the future of corporate regulation in an increasingly global economy, informing our future-regarding insights with lessons from history and political economy. Classroom lessons will be complemented by lectures from UK lawyers in the business and finance fields, as possible.

 

International Data Privacy Law

2 credits

9:00 am – 10:40 am

Classroom B-36

Take-home exam due by July 5, 2018, by 5:00 pm (EST)

Professor Ari Ezra Waldman
This course considers data protection and privacy law, particularly emphasizing an international and comparative perspective on the United States and EU member states. The European and American approaches to the regulation of personal information can differ sharply, and these differences illuminate assumptions embedded in each regime. Students will learn about the fundamental legal rules governing the handling of our information, from constitutional to statutory and administrative law. The emphasis will be on the practical application of privacy law on the ground in an international corporate environment.

 

International Human Rights Law and Migration and Refugee Law

2 credits

11:00 am – 12:40 pm

Classroom B-35

Take-home exam due by July 5, 2018, by 5:00 pm (EST)

Professor Ruti Teitel
Professor Lenni Benson
The first half of this course approaches the study of international human rights through the simultaneous exploration of law and politics, theory, and practice over seven sessions. We will begin with the study of the sources of human rights law – drawing from both customary law and from select conventions. Next, we will explore in a comparative light the relationship of rights to remedies, as exemplified in a range of criminal and civil contexts. Lastly, we will identify relevant actors, both state and non-state as well as institutions. Whenever possible, we will be joined in our discussions by members of the London-based human rights community, such as researchers from diverse universities (e.g., London School of Economics) as well as leading human rights lawyers (e.g., from Amnesty International) as well as civil society representatives. Readings for this portion of the course will include primary and secondary materials.

In the second half of the course, students will learn about migration law and constraints on foreign nationals living and working in the U.S. The course will then turn to immigration controls and the exceptions and protections offered those who can claim refugee protection. In the last portion of the course, students will also hear from UK experts and optional field trips may be possible to observe UK tribunals and/or visit the U.S. Embassy. While this course does not include a summer externship upon return to the United States, Professor Benson is willing to assist students in securing a position. Students interested in this summer work should contact her with their full resume and statement of interest by February 20, 2018.

 

International Intellectual Property Law

2 credits

2:00 pm – 3:40 pm

Classroom B-36

Take-home exam due by July 5, 2018, by 5:00 pm (EST)

Professor Brad Greenberg *
Professor Cathay Y.N. Smith
This course explores emerging and existing issues in international intellectual property law, with a primary focus on trademark and copyright law and policy. Contents of the course will evolve from year to year, but topics may include variations in the scope of rights and limitations of IP, international IP harmonization, the role of norms in the absence of laws, the evolution of non-conventional IP, and jurisdictional and extraterritorial considerations in a digital world. Students are not expected to have prior experience in intellectual property or a technical background. Classes will be conducted as seminars to encourage student participation and discussion.

* Professor Greenberg will be teaching in his personal capacity, and nothing discussed will reflect the official or unofficial positions of his employer