Publications

Beyond Permanency One Year Later: Looking Back, Looking Forward
Challenges for Former Foster Youth and Legal Reform

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In 2016, the Abbey Institute and The Children’s Law Center (CLC) jointly produced the journal Beyond Permanency One Year Later: Looking Back, Looking Forward, which includes articles by practitioners and NYLS students.

The journal came out of the 2015 Beyond Permanency: Challenges for Former Foster Youth symposium that was organized by CLC and co-sponsored by the Abbey Institute, Lawyers For Children, the Legal Aid Society, the New York City Administration for Children’s Services, the New York City Family Court, and other organizations. The symposium considered the problem of “broken adoptions” (when adopted youth return to foster care or otherwise do not remain with their adoptive family), and related issues including post-adoption sibling visitation and adoption subsidy fraud.

 

Since the symposium, New York State has made several policy changes, including new legislation for post-adoption sibling visitation and enhanced oversight of adoption subsidies. The journal discusses the symposium, the new policy changes, and proposals for future reforms.

NYLS students who contributed articles include Yannique Coleman (2018), Krystina Drasher (2017), Jarienn James (Two-Year J.D. Honors program 2016), Shante’ Morales (2017), Sara Nassof (2016), and Sarah Schmidt (2017). Allyson Guidera (2017) served as student editor.

Just Families Blog

Click here to see the Abbey Institute’s blog, JustFamilies.org.

A Brief History of Justice: The Evolution of New York State’s Family Court System

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A Brief History of Justice: The Evolution of New York State’s Family Court System (2012), begins with the 1824 establishment of the House of Refuge, the first juvenile reformatory in the nation. It moves through the Family Court system’s history, with discussions on the Children’s Courts, the 1962 Family Court Act, major Supreme Court decisions and individuals who helped drive the Family Court system’s development.