Internet Law Works-in-Progress

    Saturday, March 24, 2018
    New York Law School

    The Innovation Center for Law and Technology at New York Law School and the High Tech Law Institute at Santa Clara University School of Law hold an annual work-in-progress symposium for internet law scholarship. This conference series provides an opportunity for authors and scholars to improve their papers and projects, regardless of how well-developed or polished their theses or drafts may be. To achieve that goal, all comments to authors are made in the spirit of collaboration. We are a helpful, supportive, and noncompetitive community, and we believe in and respect all of our colleagues. These norms are at the core of why many of us love this conference.

    There were three categories of participation:

    1. Papers-in-Progress: This track is for paper drafts sufficiently advanced to share with event attendees. We allocate extra speaking time to these presentations. Papers are due Friday, February 23, by 5pm.

    2. Projects-in-Progress: This track is for research projects without a paper draft, covering anything from nearly finished papers to new ideas.

    3. Discussant: Space permitting, we welcome attendees to join the conversation as an active audience participant.

    Commentator Model

    This model involves paper workshops led by a Commentator who facilitates in-depth discussion among active participants on the author’s paper. Authors are encouraged to participate in “listening” mode without a formal presentation. This model offers more time for feedback (because authors do not present), but requires participants to spend some extra time reading papers in advance. Any participant in the papers-in-progress track my opt for this model and commentator slots will be allocated on a space-permitting basis.

    Administrative Matters

    Abstracts are due no later than January 12, 2018. Shortly thereafter, a tentative schedule for the day will be planned, including both presentation and active participant/commentator tracks. Abstracts can be submitted here.

    Papers, if applicable, are due no later than February 23, 2018. Why are papers due one month before the event? This year, we are using an active participant/commentator model for many papers. The success of that model depends on all of us putting in the time necessary to provide appropriate and helpful feedback. The extra time also gives us the chance to reshuffle the schedule if paper proposals turn out to be project proposals.

    Location

    New York Law School is located at 185 West Broadway in Manhattan. It is near several subways: the 1 at Franklin St. (1 block away); the 1, 2, 3  at Chambers St. (5 blocks away); and the A, C, E  at Canal St. (4 blocks away). You can even take the 4, 5, 6 to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall and walk west for about 5 minutes.

    Transportation

    Public Transportation:

    From anywhere in New York City: Best to take the subway. See above.

    From Long Island: The Long Island Railroad (of Palsgraf fame) runs into New York Penn Station (of depressing architecture fame). From Penn Station, take either the A, C, or E downtown to Canal St. or the 1, 2, or 3 downtown to Franklin St. or Chambers St.

    From New Jersey: Depending on where you live, you can take NJ Transit Rail or Bus, the Path Train, or even the Suburban Transit bus line. NJ Transit runs into Penn Station at 34th Street. Buses run into the Port Authority at 42nd Street. Both are on the 1, 2, 3 and the A, C,  E. The Path Train can take you to Christopher Street, which has a 1 stop at 7th Avenue.

    From Upstate New York: Take Metro-North Train into Grand Central. Then take the 4, 5, 6 downtown to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall, which is the terminus of the 6.

    By Car:

    If driving from New Jersey, take the NJ Turnpike (I-95), a toll road, to Exit 14/14A/14B/14C. You could make a last minute decision to go to Newark Airport and fly off to Maui, but we would miss you. So, follow signs for I-78 East/Bayonne/Jersey City/Holland Tunnel and then merge onto I-78 E. This will take you on the NJ Turnpike Extension and, if you stay on this road, right into the Holland Tunnel. The Tunnel spills out into a circle with several exits. Follow signs for “Downtown.” Use any lane to turn right onto Varick Street. NYLS is located at the corner of Varick St., West Broadway, and Leonard. There is a parking lot across the street. You can pay for several hours or for the entire day. I can’t even begin to describe the nightmare that is street parking in Tribeca.

    By Air:

    New York City is served by 3 major airports: Newark Liberty, JFK, and LaGuardia. They each have their advantages (except LaGuardia: there is nothing good about LaGuardia)

    Newark Liberty Int’l Airport (EWR). EWR is in New Jersey, but is a quick taxi or for-hire vehicle ride to Manhattan. The car may be expensive ($50-70 plus tip). But EWR is also connected to Manhattan via the super convenient New Jersey Transit Rail. One-way to Manhattan from EWR costs $13 and it takes about 25 minutes.

    To get to Manhattan via NJ Transit Rail, follow these instructions: At the airport, follow signs for “AirTrain.” Buy your NJ Transit ticket to “New York Penn Station” before taking the escalator up to the platform. The AirTrain, a clean, pleasant driverless tram, runs every 4 minutes. Take the AirTrain to the EWR NJ Transit station and wait for the next train, usually on Track 1, to New York Penn Station. Then follow the subway directions above.

    John F. Kennedy Int’l Airport (JFK).  JFK is in southern Queens. It boasts a beautiful, new-ish JetBlue terminal and a few restaurants that actually won awards. (Who gives out awards for airport cuisine?) The easiest way to get from JFK to Manhattan is via taxi or for-hire vehicle. It’s on the expensive side; for taxis, there is a flat fare of $52 plus tolls and tip. It takes about 30 minutes, but longer with traffic.

    If you have about 1 hour to spare, you can take public transportation from JFK to Manhattan. It costs a total of $7.75 ($5 for the AirTrain and $2.75 for a subway ride). After deplaning, follow signs for the AirTrain. This AirTrain does not just circle the airport. It takes you into Queens to the nearest (not really that “near”) subway or LIRR stop. You can go either to Jamaica Station and take the  to Canal Street or E to Howard Beach Station and take the A to Canal Street.

    LaGuardia Int’l Airport (LGA). LGA is in northern Queens. Honestly, Vice President Biden was right about LGA. Still, it’s getting a multi-billion dollar overhaul. A state-of-the-art airport should be ready for 12th Annual Internet Law Works-in-Progress Conference. So, we have that to look forward to.

    The easiest way to get from LGA to Manhattan is via taxi or for-hire vehicle. It may cost approximately $35-45 plus tolls and tip. Public transportation is a little frustrating from LGA. You can take the M60 bus from LGA, which can drop you off right near the 116th Street 1 train station near Columbia. After walking around Columbia’s historic urban campus, you can follow the subway directions above. That trip takes about 1 hour from M60 to NYLS.

    Hotel

    Check back here soon for more information.

    Meeting Venue

    The conference will be held in various rooms in NYLS at 185 West Broadway. When you arrive, check in at the desk in the Lobby and proceed directly to breakfast in the Events Center on the 2nd Floor.


    Questions? Comments? Anxieties? Other emotional reactions? Please do not hesitate to email me at ari.waldman@nyls.edu. Internet-related humor is welcome.

    Empty tab. Edit page to add content here.