Clinical and Experiential Learning

In keeping with New York Law School’s top tanking in clinical and experiential learning, we require all students affiliated with the Innovation Center to complete a project that combines classroom learning with real world practice.

Clinics

Cyberharassment Clinic

The Cyberharassment Clinic provides an unprecedented opportunity for 2L and 3L day and 3L and 4L evening students to represent victims of online harassment, cyberbullying, and “revenge porn” under the direct supervision of a faculty member and experienced practitioner. The Cyberharassment Clinic is the first and only law school clinic representing clients in this space.

Clinic students work in teams to handle all elements of representing clients in online harassment litigation, from client intake and cease-and-desist letters to take-down notices and internet intermediary negotiations to trial and even impact litigation. Students engage in fact investigations, conduct interviews of clients, locate and interview witnesses, communicate with internet platforms if applicable, and negotiate with websites. Students develop legal arguments and draft affidavits and memoranda of law in support of pre-trial motions. Students also have the opportunity to go to trial, if applicable.

In addition to the case work, students attend an hour-and-forty minute seminar once weekly. The seminar involves discussions about the cases, instruction on relevant law, procedure and evidence, as well as examination of policy issues related to online harassment, cyberbullying, and revenge porn.

This clinic is comprised of two co-requisite courses – a two credit seminar and a two credit fieldwork experience. Students should expect to devote a minimum of 16 hours per week to the clinic, including the fieldwork and the seminar.

The Cyberharassment Clinic is directed by Adjunct Professor Andrew Santa Ana. Through direct legal representation and advocacy, Professor Santa Ana has worked to advance the rights of young survivors of intimate partner violence. He serves as the co-chair of the New York-based Lawyer’s Committee Against Domestic Violence. In 2015, he was named a Movement Maker by the NoVo Foundation’s Move to End Violence. Since 2013, he has served as a trainer with the American Bar Association’s Commission on Domestic and Sexual Violence. In 2011, he was awarded a Courage award from the NYC City Anti-Violence project for his work to set up and administer a free legal clinic for LGBTQ survivors of intimate partner violence.

Patent Trademark Office (PTO) Patent Clinic

The PTO Patent Clinic is a full year clinic that provides an opportunity for second and third year students to practice patent prosecution in front of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, the government agency that issues patents.

Students work with an experienced patent attorney to consult with clients, determine patentability of inventions, determine patent application strategy, conduct prior art searches, submit applications, respond to Patent Examiners, and provide related counsel services associated with patent applications and prosecution.

In addition to their casework, students attend a weekly seminar in which they learn the skills necessary to represent clients in front of the PTO, discuss ongoing cases and developing case law in patent law, and discuss policy issues associated with patents and the new America Invents Act.

Students spend approximately 16 hours per week on their fieldwork and seminar.

The PTO Patent Clinic is directed by Adjunct Professor Michael J. Marcin. Professor Marcin has over seventeen years of experience in all areas of intellectual property law, including patent, trademark, copyright and related issues. Professor Marcin primarily concentrates on patent-related issues for prosecution, counseling, litigation and licensing purposes. Professor Marcin’s practice includes experience in all areas of patent prosecution including the writing of original applications, reexamination, and reissue practice. He engages in all phases of complex patent litigation from the filing of the complaint through the appeals process. He also counsels clients on matters such as the development of intellectual property policies and procedures and the scope of intellectual property rights including both the client’s rights and the possible infringement of the rights of others. Furthermore, Professor Marcin has worked with clients to determine whether patents were essential, commercially relevant or nonessential to technical standards issued by industry standards groups. Professor Marcin’s standard work has extended to mobile telephone networks (e.g., LTE technology), other wireless communications networks (e.g., IEEE 802.11x) and data coding technologies (e.g., MPEG coding).

For information on how to qualify for the PTO Patent Law Clinic, click here.

Patent Trademark Office (PTO) Trademark Clinic

The PTO Trademark Clinic is a full year clinic that provides an unprecedented opportunity for 2L and 3L day and 3L and 4L evening students to represent entrepreneurs who cannot afford expensive counsel before the United States Patent and Trademark Office.  As a participant in the Trademark Clinic, students practice a variety of important skills, including client interviewing, drafting letters of communication with a federal agency, providing informal business and legal counsel, and writing memoranda and appellate briefs.  More specifically, the Trademark Clinic allows students interested in intellectual property to apply what they have learned in class: students evaluate trademarks for distinctiveness, conduct trademark searches, draft persuasive documents for trademark applications, and communicate with the PTO during the pendency of the application evaluation period.

In addition to the case work, students attend an hour-and-forty minute seminar once weekly.  The seminar involves discussions about the cases, instruction on relevant law, procedure and evidence, as well as examination of policy issues related to intellectual property, trademarks, and entrepreneurship.

Students devote a minimum of 16 hours per week to the clinic, including the fieldwork and the seminar.

The PTO Trademark Clinic is directed by Adjunct Professor Kimberly Maynard. Professor Maynard has represented emerging and established companies on intellectual property matters across a variety of industries, including technology, fashion, jewelry, finance, food, automotive, television and dance. Professor Maynard has represented clients before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board and has litigated cases involving complex trademark, trade dress, copyright and design patent issues in federal court. She has also negotiated complex license and settlement agreements, advised on domain names and social media, and counseled on the proper use of trademarks and trade dress.

Capstone Projects

All students affiliated with the Innovation Center are required to complete a Capstone project that makes a different in the community as a culmination of their law and technology education. To complete the experiential capstone requirement, students must complete a “Center Citizenship” project outside the classroom. Students will present their work at Innovation Scholars Day at the end of the Spring semester, and their project summaries will be posted here.