NYLS in the News

LeGal, “Lesbian/Gay Law Notes Podcast: Special Obergefell v. Hodges Decision Edition”

By Arthur Leonard
June 29, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same Sex Marriage

“This special edition of the podcast covers the momentous June 26, 2015 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, striking down all remaining state bans on same-sex marriage.  It includes analysis of Justice Kennedy’s majority opinion and all of the dissents, as well as discussion of how the decision has been received in the last remaining holdout states and what is next for the LGBT rights movement.”

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Gotham Gazette, “The Week Ahead in New York Politics, June 29″

June 28, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Events: Citizens Union
Subject: Citizens Union Event at New York Law School

“Tuesday evening, beginning at 6 p.m. at New York Law School, good government group Citizens Union hosts ‘Effective Police Accountability; Building Public Trust and Ensuring Public Safety in Our Community…engaging dialogue on how New York can strengthen police accountability, improve public oversight, boost police-community relations, and ensure public safety.’ Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams will give opening remarks, which will be followed by a panel discussion featuring Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance, former Brooklyn Assistant District Attorney and NYPD Deputy Commissioner Arnold Kriss, Communities United for Police Reform’s Joo-Hyun Kang, and Philip Eure, Inspector General for the NYPD; and moderated by Citizens Union Executive Director Dick Dadey.”

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The Cornell Daily Sun, “Rejoicing Over Historic Same-Sex Marriage Ruling, Cornellians Say Decision Is Only First Step”

By David Ticzon
June 27, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same Sex Marriage

“Following a landmark 5-4 Supreme Court ruling on Friday that guaranteed Americans the right to a same-sex marriage, Cornell students, faculty, staff and alumni rejoiced, though some expressed the belief that the decision was only a single step in achieving equality for all. Friday’s decision has been met with resistance from several ‘delusional’ and ‘ignorant’ governors pushing to override the decision with an amendment, said Prof. Arthur S. Leonard ’74, law, New York Law School. Leonard is also the founder of the Gay and Lesbian Alumni Association at Cornell and the LGBT Lawyers Association of Greater New York.”

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The Fiscal Times, “The Other Disaster the Supreme Court Prevented Yesterday”

By David Dayen
June 26, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Andrew Scherer
Subject: Supreme Court Ruling

“Yesterday, the Supreme Court rejected a misreading of a statute meant to gut its efficacy and upheld a signature law that protects Americans from unequal treatment. In a similarly monumental ruling, the Court decided 5-4 that the Fair Housing Act (FHA) of 1968 includes a ‘disparate impact’ standard — meaning that litigants can sue if they find that minorities are treated adversely by a particular housing policy, regardless of stated intent. Housing advocates have long worried that the lawsuit, Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. Inclusive Communities Project, might gut the FHA, in the same manner that the Court weakened the Voting Rights Act in the last term. ‘It does look like we’ve dodged a bullet,’ said Andrew Scherer, Policy Director at the Impact Center for Public Interest Law at New York Law School.”

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The New York Times, “In Jail, Presumed Innocent”

By Robert Blecker
June 26, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Robert Blecker
Subject: Reforms at Rikers Island Prison

“Everyone rightly decries the horrid conditions at Rikers Island, and almost everyone applauds serious cooperative efforts to ameliorate them. But one largely unstated principle should animate all reforms: The punishment should fit the crime. The vast majority of prisoners inside Rikers await trial (or plea disposition). They are still presumed innocent.”

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Out-FM, “Historic Victory for Gay Rights Movement”

June 26, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same Sex Marriage

“Across the nation LGBT people, their family and friends are celebrating a land mark ruling by the Supreme Court that appears to lift some of the oppressive weight and institutional oppression caused by the so-called ‘Defense of Marriage Act’ Between 70K and 140K same-sex couples are already married in the states that allow it. While 37 states had legalized same-sex marriage at the time of the ruling, most were the product of a judicial ruling. We’re joined by Arthur Leonard, who teaches at the New York Law School and is a columnist on legal matters for Gay City News to discuss the meaning of the ruling and the continuing struggle ahead.

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WPIX 11, “New York played influential role in helping fuel gay marriage momentum”

By Mario Diaz
June 26, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same Sex Marriage

“’We have hit a landmark event in the unfolding story of the lesbian gay rights movement,’ said Arthur Leonard, a renowned law professor at New York Law School. Leonard is also husband to Tim. They have been together since 1979 and a married couple since 2009. In fact, Leonard says that 36 years ago the couple never thought about gay marriage.”

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Gay City News, “Justice Kennedy Focuses on Fundamental Right to Marry, Protected Liberty”

By Arthur Leonard
June 26, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same Sex Marriage

“The Supreme Court ruled today that ‘same-sex couples may exercise the right to marry’ and that ‘there is no lawful basis for a State to refuse to recognize a lawful same-sex marriage performed in another State on the ground of its same-sex character.’”

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International Business Times, “Supreme Court Says Plaintiffs Can Challenge ‘Unconscious Prejudices’ In Fair Housing Case”

By Catherine Dunn
June 25, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Andrew Scherer
Subject: U.S. Supreme Court

“The Supreme Court on Thursday ruled in favor of a decades-old legal tool used to combat housing segregation. In a 5-4 decision, the court handed a win to civil rights advocates who say the tool is essential for advancing economic opportunity. The ruling delivers a blow to banks that argue the legal standard makes credit costlier, and harder to get. ‘I do believe a decision going the other way would have essentially rendered housing discrimination laws meaningless,’ says Andrew Scherer, a former civil legal aid attorney, who is now policy director at the Impact Center for Public Interest Law at New York Law School.”

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The Atlantic, “The U.S. Supreme Court Walks a Fine Line on Race”

By Alana Semuels
June 25, 2015

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Andrew Scherer
Subject: U.S. Supreme Court

The Roberts court has had a lot to say about race. It upheld a Michigan ban on affirmative action for university admissions. It struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, arguing that laws addressing the South’s history of racial discrimination were no longer needed. And it nixed voluntary school-desegregation plans that assign students to schools based on racial quotas. In that way, the decision is in line with the Parents Involved decision about school segregation, said Andrew Scherer, the policy director of the Impact Center for Public Interest Law at New York Law School.”

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