NYLS in the News

CNN Money article, “The dark side of livestreaming: Periscoping a rape”

By Sara Ashley O'Brien
April 29, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Ari Waldman
Subject: Cyberbullying

“Invading someones privacy through the misuse of technology isn’t new,” said Ari Ezra Waldman, an associate professor of law at New York Law School.

Waldman founded the Tyler Clementi Institute for CyberSafety at New York Law School, named after the 18-year-old Rutgers student who committed suicide in 2010 after his roommate covertly livestreamed him having sex with another man. Its goal is to provide education, research and legal outreach for victims of Internet harassment.

Waldman said the Lonina case “strikes us as revolting that someone can watch a rape and do nothing about it. It shows how minimally someone can value another person’s life.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Spiked story, “Banning Pornography is Demeaning to Women”

April 29, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Nadine Strossen
Subject: Free Speech

In this week’s spiked podcast, we discuss feminism and free speech. In 1991, Nadine Strossen became the first female and youngest ever president of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and though she has fought censorship of all kinds during her career, it was her battle against the anti-porn feminists of the late Eighties and early Nineties which formed the basis for her seminal 1995 book Defending Pornography. We caught up with Nadine in New York City, to discuss why free speech is essential to women’s equality.

To view this article in full, click here.

Lloyd’s List article, “Clay Maitland wins lifetime achievement award”

April 28, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Alumni: Clay Maitland '68
Subject: Shipping Industry

Mr Maitland’s formative years (if one could say he was formed) were spent in bucolic Connecticut, where he dabbled in sailing, frogs and education. Despite his lack of application he was accepted into Columbia University, where he majored in fraternity management. Upon graduation, and not having any particular orientation, he went to New York law school, which allowed him to graduate in 1968.

To view this article in full, click here.

Legal Scholarship Blog post, “Third National Symposium On Experiential Learning In Law – New York City, NY”

April 28, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Events: National Symposium on Experiential Learning
Subject: Legal Education

June 10-12, 2016, New York Law School hosts the 2016 Third National Symposium on Experiential Learning in Law, which “will take a careful look at how to identify and effectively assess experiential learning outcomes in the legal education context. This symposium will offer highly interactive sessions that will provide learning designed to improve the quality of assessment in law schools’ experiential programs.”

To view this article in full, click here.

International Business Times article, “Drug Price Debate: Can An Obscure Supreme Court Patent Case Lead To Lower Prescription Prices?”

By ELIZABETH WHITMAN
April 28, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Jacob Sherkow
Subject: Genetics

“Generic manufacturers want to get in the market as soon as they can,” Jacob Sherkow, an associate professor of law at New York Law School, said. “As soon as it’s possible for them to challenge drug patents they do so. They do not just wait around until patents expire,” he added, explaining that generic drugmakers challenge brand-name ones “very aggressively.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Stat News article, “Scientists solve CRISPR’s ‘Energizer bunny’ problem”

By Sharon Begley
April 27, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Jacob Sherkow
Subject: CRISPR

The seemingly constant advances also may turn the bitter patent battle over CRISPR into a historical footnote. “If something else becomes the fundamental technology,” said Jacob Sherkow of New York Law School, then the original CRISPR patents — awarded to the Broad Institute and challenged by the University of California — “might be worth less than people envisioned.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Currents story on Presidential Primaries

April 27, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Alumni: Brian Kaszuba '04
Subject: Politics

Brian Kaszuba ’04 is interviewed on this NetTV program about the 2016 Presidential Primaries.

To view this article in full, click here.

Providence Journal article, “Mark Patinkin: All the answers to your Deflategate questions”

By Mark Patinkin
April 26, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Robert Blecker
Subject: DeflateGate

“But two out of three appeals judges said the NFL’s corporate rules give Goodell the right to punish anyway.”

True, but that interpretation has a lot of critics, including Robert Blecker, a New York Law School professor who’s no Patriots fan but filed a brief for Brady and has said Goodell’s power violates basic rights. Blecker put it this way: “A person cannot be a judge in his own case. We’ve known this in Western culture for 30 centuries.” Blecker says the Deflategate charges should have never been filed.

To view this article in full, click here.

DLA Piper article, “The blockchain revolution, smart contracts and financial transactions”

By Nicolette Kost De Sevres, Bart Chilton, Bradley Cohen
April 26, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Houman Shadab
Subject: bitcoin

Originally developed as the technology underpinning bitcoin, blockchain has been heralded as an innovative technology with wide-ranging application beyond digital currency (or cryptocurrency), including as a platform for so-called smart contracts − self-executing, autonomous computer protocols that facilitate, execute and enforce commercial agreements between two or more parties.

As discussed below, blockchain-based smart contracts have enormous potential to streamline financial transactions and reduce the counterparty risk associated with monitoring or enforcing contractual obligations.

To view this article in full, click here.

The Journal Gazette article, “Lawyers missed it: Brady’s innocent”

By Sally Jenkins
April 26, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Robert Blecker
Subject: DeflateGate

To date, we are still looking for a single shred of credible evidence that any human hand deflated the footballs in that AFC championship game. Where is the conduct? Much less the conduct detrimental?

Somehow this point was missed in the many briefs and oral arguments. Consequently, three judges of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals missed it, too, ruling 2-1 in favor of the NFL and reinstating Brady’s four-game suspension. Even Chief Judge Robert A. Katzmann, whose water-clear dissent left Brady some faint hope, missed it. Katzmann believes that Goodell invented “his own brand of industrial justice,” and if the chief justice thinks so, then perhaps a full 2nd Circuit panel will too, should Brady seek a stay and appeal. If he does, this time around his lawyers should emphasize the only truly salient point of the entire case. As New York Law School professor Robert Blecker put it, “What happened to the deflate part of Deflategate?”

To view this article in full, click here.