In the News

“ABS General Counsel recognized by U.S. Merchant Marine Academy for distinguished accomplishments”

By Hellenic Shipping News
September 20, 2017

NYLS Alumni: Robert Clyne ’88

Robert (Bob) Clyne, ABS Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary, was recognized with the Outstanding Professional Achievement Award for his distinguished accomplishments as a graduate who best exemplifies the finest tradition of Kings Point – Acta Non Verba – and lending honor and prestige to the United States Merchant Marine Academy.

“Bob is most deserving of this recognition,” said ABS Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer Christopher J. Wiernicki. “Bob is a recognized leader who epitomizes exceptional qualities placing him among the best and brightest in the maritime industry and this award indicates the quality of the ABS leadership team.”

To view this article in full, click here.

“Community Board 10 Report Offers Snapshot of Dyker Heights”

By Brooklyn Daily Eagle
September 20, 2017

NYLS Alumni: Brian Kaszuba '04

A planned residential-commercial development on the Dyker Heights-Sunset Park border that includes a hotel, a shopping mall and hundreds of housing units could have a significant impact on housing, transportation and jobs in surrounding communities, according to a report issued by the Zoning and Land Use Committee of Community Board 10.

The 31-page report, titled “6200 Eighth Avenue: Where Neighborhoods Collide,” took a look at the Eighth Avenue Center, a development planned for the site. The report also includes data on current population figures, jobs and housing.

To view this article in full, click here.

“This pharma CEO won praise for his ‘social contract’ with the public. But latest move could shred that pledge”

By STAT
September 19, 2017

NYLS Faculty: Jake Sherkow

One year ago, Brent Saunders tried to single-handedly reset the national debate over drug pricing.

The Allergan chief executive issued a “social contract” and vowed to keep price hikes below 10 percent a year. He argued that drug makers could — and should — act responsibly amid smoldering criticism over prices. Few companies followed suit, but Saunders won a high profile for his efforts.

Now, though, an ingenious deal he struck to protect Allergan’s patents on a lucrative drug calls into question his campaign to do right by the American public. In short, the social contract may be headed for the trash bin.

To view this article in full, click here.

“City’s New ‘Right to Counsel’ Law to Help Protect Harlem Tenants”

By The UpTowner
September 19, 2017

NYLS Faculty: Andrew Scherer

With a staggering number of cases to be heard in Manhattan Housing Court, the wooden benches lining the 8th floor were filled. Aziz Souss, 47, waiting nervously outside the courtroom for his case to be called, had to stand.

He had fallen behind on his rent and was also pursuing an HP action, a legal proceeding against his landlord to force repairs in his Harlem building. “I was here in July, then the case was adjourned to August and then my lawyer didn’t show up,” Souss said. “The judge referred me for another lawyer, but they wouldn’t represent me. They said I already had one. Now I have no lawyer and maybe no apartment.”

To view this article in full, click here.

“Barring Survivors of Domestic Violence from Food Security: The Unintended Consequences of 1996 Welfare and Immigration Reform”

By Drexel Law Review
September 19, 2017

NYLS Faculty: Claire Thomas

During the 1990s, Congress amended the Immigration and Nationality Act (“INA”) to create forms of immigration relief for previously neglected vulnerable groups. One such group—survivors of domestic violence—was aided through the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”), which amended the INA to allow abused spouses, children, and parents of U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents to self-petition for family-based immigration benefits without the abuser’s knowledge. Both abused female and male spouses are able to receive immigration benefits under VAWA, as well as spouses in same-sex marriages.

To view this article in full, click here.

“Residential/Hospitality Best Project: 56 Leonard”

By ENRNewYork
September 19, 2017

NYLS Mentioned

With its atypical floor plates, many cantilevered floors and irregular balcony spacing and locations, 56 Leonard has been dubbed the Jenga building, since it resembles the children’s tower block game. Unlike most high-rise buildings, the 57-story ultra-luxury residential tower in Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood was developed from the inside out, says its project team. The project began with the design of individual rooms, grouped together per floor, which came together to shape the outside of the structure.

To view this article in full, click here.

“Allergan sidesteps patent review with tribal deal”

By Chemistry World
September 19, 2017

NYLS Faculty: Jake Sherkow

In a somewhat surprising move, pharmaceutical firm Allergan has transferred ownership of six patents to a Native American tribe, to shield them from being challenged by generic manufacturers.

The deal with the Saint Regis Mohawk tribe aims to use tribal sovereign immunity to shield patents relating to dry eye treatment Restasis (ciclosporin) from inter partes review (IPR), a process at the US Patent and Trade Office that Allergan views as unfair.

To view this article in full, click here.

“Top 10 LL.M. Programs in New York”

By LLM Guide
September 19, 2017

NYLS Mentioned

Although New York is not the biggest state in the US, it certainly carries its weight: it’s the fourth-most populous state in the country; if it was an independent country, it would rank as the twelfth biggest economy in the world. A number of law schools offer LL.M. programs in the state: many in and around New York City (of course), but others further north (‘upstate,’ as the locals say.) Here are the top 10 LL.M. programs in New York state:

To view this article in full, click here.

“NBCLatino20: The Crusader, Desiree Hernandez”

By NBC News
September 18, 2017

NYLS Alumni: Desiree Hernandez '08

Her clients are not rich or powerful. She works in a basement office. Her team represents some of the most vulnerable people in our society.

But Desireé Hernández is not afraid to take on the U.S. government when she believes a child has the legal right to remain in this country.

As Director of Legal Services for the Safe Passage Project, Hernández manages a team providing free legal representation to over 650 immigrant children facing deportation. Her job includes everything from recruiting volunteer attorneys for unaccompanied minors to conducting interviews with kids who may have a case for asylum, special immigrant juvenile status and other forms of relief. Without her and her colleagues at the New York City nonprofit organization, some of these children might go through the immigration court system alone.

To view this article in full, click here.

“NYCLU: Police forces “being run like secret clubs”

By Times Union
September 18, 2017

NYLS Alumni: Johanna Miller '08

Police departments across the state, including those in Albany, Schenectady, Troy and Saratoga Springs are resisting or unnecessarily delaying Freedom of Information Law requests for records on use of force, misconduct complaints, racial profiling and the use of surveillance equipment, according to a study released Monday by the New York Civil Liberties Union.

The findings are the result of Freedom of Information Law requests submitted by the civil liberties organization to 23 New York police departments. According to the NYCLU, over the course of two years, many of the departments ignored legal deadlines and “excessively” redacted documents. Of the departments contacted, 20 did not respond within the time period mandated under state law, the report states.

To view this article in full, click here.