NYLS in the News

NYLS mentioned “South Carolina officials keeping a close eye on Zika in Florida”

By Bo Petersen and Dave Munday
August 24, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Center: Center for New York City Law
Subject: Health, Zicka Virus

“We are just trying to kill Aedes mosquitoes,” Mary T. Bassett, the city’s health commissioner, said in a speech on Friday at New York Law School, according to The New York Times. “We are trying to push down a potential vector without evidence that it is yet a public health threat.”

For Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett’s full speech click here.

To view this article in full, click here.

Jake Sherkow mentioned “ ‘Biocurious’ about biotech? Here are 10 must-follow Twitter accounts”

By Damian Garde
August 22, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty:
Subject: Patents, Twitter

The legal mind: @jsherkow
Patents are important in biotech, as the latest multimillion-dollar fracas suggests. And Jacob Sherkow, a professor at New York Law School, is an expert in the field. Look to him for context on the latest squabbles over biosimilars, thoughts on the legal implications of data sharing, and tweetstorms about the future of CRISPR.

To view this article in full, click here.

CityLaw Breakfast featured “New York City Wages War on the Zika Virus”

By MARC SANTORA
August 21, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Center: Center for New York City Law
Subject: Health, Zicka Virus

“We are just trying to kill Aedes mosquitoes,” Mary T. Bassett, the city’s health commissioner, said in a speech on Friday at New York Law School. “We are trying to push down a potential vector without evidence that it is yet a public health threat.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Safe Passage and Gui Stampur featured “Across the Border and Into School”

By Emily Deruy
August 20, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Projects and Institutes: Safe Passage Project
Subject: Safe Passage

A few years ago, after kids started coming to him for advice about how to navigate college applications—undocumented students aren’t eligible for federal aid—Lenzner sought the advice of a lawyer friend, Gui Stampur, the associate director of the Safe Passage Project. Safe Passage is a nonprofit linked to New York Law School that represents unaccompanied minors in the immigration process. But after helping Lenzner’s students figure out how to legally access higher education, word spread, and now Safe Passage works directly with schools across the city to provide lawyers for students who need help with immigration cases.

To view this article in full, click here.

CityLaw Breakfast featured “Health Dept. Head Questions Why Pregnant Women Are Traveling to Zika Areas”

By Nicole Levy
August 19, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Center: Center for New York City Law
Subject: Health, Zicka Virus

“We tell people they should not engage in any non-essential travel, but for me — and this may represent a value judgment — it’s really hard to understand what essential travel is for a pregnant women who may be placing her unborn baby at risk for birth defects,” Bassett said at the New York Law School event.

To watch Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett’s full speech click here.

To view this article in full, click here.

Judge Theodore Weathers ’81 profiled “Maintaining Respect: San Diego County Judge Theodore Weathers wins praise from attorneys for his steady hand”

By Dean Calbreath
August 18, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Alumni: Judge Theodore Weathers ’81

San Diego County Judge Theodore Weathers ’81 wins praise from attorneys for his steady hand.

“He handles a lot of very serious matters, but everyone ls very cordial and respectful in his courtroom; said Deputy District Attorney Carlos Varela. “I like a courtroom where the judge is clearly in charge and I think most lawyers would appreciate the level of formality In his court.”

I’ve never seen him get upset, whether he’s dealing with a particularly difficult case or day-to-day business,” Varela added. “He’s very even-keeled.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Jake Sherkow quoted “Student Alleges His Team Didn’t Earn CRISPR Patent”

August 18, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Jake Sherkow
Subject: Patents

“They’re saying that, given what [Doudna] reported, any molecular biologist could do it in eukaryotes. Broad is saying, no, this was actually a big cognitive and technical leap,” Jacob Sherkow of New York Law School told STAT. “That leads me to believe this will be much harder to resolve than I thought.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Art Leonard publishes three new articles in Gay City News

By Art Leonard
August 18, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Art Leonard
Subject: LGBT Rights

Full articles available here: “Supreme Court Blocks Virginia Trans Boy’s Bathroom Access,” “Gay Jamaican Immigrant Gets Deportation Reprieve,” and “Texas Denies Trans Man’s Request for Legal Gender Change” 

To view this article in full, click here.

Jacob Sherkow quoted “Patents vs. Market Exclusivity: Why Does it Take so Long to Bring Generics to Market?”

August 17, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Jacob Sherkow
Subject: Patents

Jacob Sherkow, an associate professor in intellectual property law at New York Law School, explained to Focus: “The strength of the US pharma patent system is one of the reasons why a lot of companies do their main research and development here in the US. The thing driving them to sell their products in the US first is we’re one of the few (if not only) industrialized countries that doesn’t have a nationalized health system … A drug that’s a flop in the US will not make up that lost revenue elsewhere.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Jacob Sherkow quoted on STAT, “Lies, damn lies, and CRISPR: the legal battle escalates”

By Sharon Begley
August 17, 2016

 

 

 

 

NYLS Faculty: Jacob Sherkow
Subject: Patent, Trademark, USPTO, CRISPR

When the US Patent and Trademark Office announced in January that it was reopening its decision to award key CRISPR-Cas9 patents to the Broad (technically, “declaring an interference proceeding”), many legal experts expected the case to turn on who made the key discoveries and inventions first. In fact, said intellectual property expert Jacob Sherkow of New York Law School, it may turn on something even more basic: whether the Doudna and Zhang CRISPR inventions are for the same thing, as almost everyone assumed.

To view this article in full, click here.