2012

Bloomberg BNA’s Electronic Commerce & Law Report

December 31, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Competition and regulation in internet space

James Grimmelmann quoted on competition and regulation in internet space in Bloomberg BNA’s Electronic Commerce & Law Report (page 21).

This article available by subscription only.

The Huffington Post, “You Kill Me: Why I Don’t Want to Live Around People With Guns”

By Brandt Goldstein
December 23, 2012

NYLS Faculty Brandt Goldstein
Subject: Gun control

“In recent years, much has been made about how divided our polity is. There are red states and blue states, conservative regions and liberal regions, right- and left-wing cable news networks and websites. Given the current rift, it’s a sad irony that we call ourselves the United States of America.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “NYLS Wins Dismissal of Class Action Over Job Figures”

By Brendan Pierson
December 21, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Lawsuit dismissed

“Although criticizing New York Law School for being “less than candid,” a state appeals panel yesterday affirmed the dismissal of a class action lawsuit accusing the school of misleading potential students about its graduates’ success in finding legal jobs.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Above the LawABA JournalLaw 360 and The Wall Street Journal.

Forbes, “The End is at Hand”

By James D. Zirin
December 20, 2012

NYLS Trustee James Zirin
Subject: Apocalypse

“Last Christmas, I wrote a piece for Forbes, pointing out that 2011 was an unparalleled year of uncertainty because so much had happened that left us twisting in the wind, wondering what would happen next. I concluded the article by expressing hope for a little more certainty in 2012.”

To view this article in full, click here.

IFLR, “Former SEC Counsel: Whistleblower Programme Shortcomings”

By Michael Wasburn
December 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty Howard Meyers
Subject: Whistleblower Programme

“The US Securities and Exchange Commission’s (SEC) Annual Report on the Dodd-Frank Whistleblower Program: Fiscal Year 2012 reveals a programme that is still grappling with many difficulties, lawyers have said. Howard Meyers, a former lawyer in the SEC’s division of Enforcement who now teaches at New York Law School and is a partner at Meyers & Heim, said that while he is generally supportive of the goals of the whistleblower programme, he suspects it may be severely understaffed.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Personal Notes on Lawyers”

December 18, 2012

NYLS Assistant Dean Jeffrey Becherer
Subject: New position

“Jeffery Becherer has been appointed assistant dean for career planning at New York Law School. He was associate director of the Office of Career Services at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.”

To view this article in full, click here.

CrimProf Blog, “Perlin, Cucolo & Ikehara on Disability Rights and Criminal Justice in Asia”

December 17, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin & Heather Cucolo
Subject: Disability Rights

“Michael L. Perlin (pictured), Heather Cucolo and Yoshikazu Ikehara (New York Law School , New York Law School and Tokyo Advocacy Law Office) have posted Online Mental Disability Law Education, a Disability Rights Tribunal, and the Creation of an Asian Disability Law Database: Their Impact on Research, Training and Teaching of Law, Criminology Criminal Justice in Asia (Asian Journal of Legal Education, Vol. 1, No. 1, 2013) on SSRN.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “Group Aims to Be a Conduit for WikiLeaks Donations.”

By David Carr
December 16, 2012

NYLS PLJ Associate Trevor Timm ’11
Subject: WikiLeaks donations

“A group advocating a more transparent government has formed a nonprofit organization called the Freedom of the Press Foundation to serve as a conduit for donations to organizations like WikiLeaks. ‘The cutoff in funds of WikiLeaks occurred without any court proceedings,’ said Trevor Timm, co-founder and executive director of the Freedom of the Press Foundation.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “Making Us Safer, One iPad at a Time”

By Steve Cohen
December 15, 2012

NYLS Student Steven Cohen
Subject: Delays in criminal cases

“‘I like my cases to age as long as possible, like a fine wine.’ The Legal Aid lawyer was articulating a basic principle of criminal defense practice: delay helps the accused. People forget, they get scared, they move, and things get lost.”

To view this article in full, click here.

China Digital Times, “New Mental Health Law: More Problems than Solutions?”

By Samuel Wade
December 14, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin
Subject: Mental Health Law

“China passed its first mental health law in October, after almost thirty years of efforts. One of the major improvements to the law since earlier drafts is the removal of the provision that specifically permitted involuntary commitment if the individual’s behavior was deemed to be ‘disturbing public order’ or ‘endangering public safety’ (see interview with Prof. Michael Perlin about this issue here).”

To view this article in full, click here.

NY Convergence, “Could iPads Make #NYPD More Efficient?”

By Steve Cohen
December 12, 2012

NYLS Student Steve Cohen
Subject: iPads & the NYPD

“If every NYPD officer had an iPad, the city’s criminal justice system would be a lot more efficient. That’s the view of Steve Cohen, a New York Law School student who recently worked at a district attorney’s office.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “’At the Crossroads of Legal Code, Computer code, and the Codex’: In Re Books Presentations Now Online”

December 13, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: In re Books

“On October 26 and 27—yes, just before Hurricane Sandy slammed the Northeast—New York Law School held In re Books, a “conference on law and the future of books.” Hosted by NYLS professor (and PW contributing editor) James Grimmelmann, the conference brought together authors, publishers, librarians, scholars, and readers to think deeply about the challenges facing books in a digital age”

To view this article in full, click here.

Lawyerist, “Women in Law: Losing Ground?”

By Allison Shields
December 12, 2012

NYLS’s Law Review’s Diversity Report
Subject: Women in Law

“A local law school Dean recently commented that women seem to be backsliding in the legal profession. She cited lower female enrollment in law schools, lack of women in law firm leadership positions, and stagnant growth in the ranks of women in the judiciary. The 2011-2012 New York Law School Law Review Diversity Report was prepared by the New York Law School Law Review in conjunction with Ms. JD and based on a survey of law reviews at ABA-approved law schools. The survey showed that on average, women held 43% of leadership positions on law reviews, but only 31% of the Editor-In-Chief positions.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Magazine, “A Tree for All Seasons”

December 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Lawrence Lederman
Subject: Photography

“Since retiring as chairman of global corporate practice at Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, attorney Larry Lederman has been busy. He is now serving as counsel to the firm as well as teaching at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Minnesota Lawyer, “Remember: Lawyers (and judges) are Word People”

By Ami C. Janda
December 10, 2012

The New York Law School Law Review
Subject: Literary Lawyers

“William L. Prosser, the torts scholar of whose name any 1L is familiar, said that law is ‘one of the principal literary professions. One might hazard the supposition that the average lawyer in the course of a lifetime does more writing than a novelist.’ Jessica Silbey, in her article ‘Images in/of Law,’ in the New York Law School Law Review, notes that, exactly as novelists, ‘lawyers and judges are word people … We might use chalk to diagram a room or a chase.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Minding the Workplace, “Dignity Work”

By David Yamada
December 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin
Subject: Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict

“In a blog about work, that’s the best way I can tag the array of projects, initiatives, and passions that drew people from around the world to the annual Workshop on Transforming Humiliation and Violent Conflict, sponsored by the Human Dignity and Humiliation Studies Network (HumanDHS) and hosted by Columbia University, Teachers College, in New York. This year’s workshop ran last Thursday and Friday. Congratulations to friend and colleague Michael Perlin (New York Law School), who received the HumanDHS Lifetime Achievement Award at the workshop.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Gotham Gazette, “Why The Latest Delay To The Bike Share Program May Not Be The Last”

By Cody Lyon
December 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ross Sandler
Subject: Bike Share Program

“The latest delay of the city’s bike share program is being blamed on damage caused to equipment by the floodwaters of Superstorm Sandy. Ross Sandler, director for the Center for New York City Law at the New York Law School, (who has not read and is not familiar with the the bike share RFP or contract) explained that the term ‘demonstrated financial capability’ is simply a legal term of art. It basically means the bidding company needs to be able to fulfill the terms of the contract.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Michelangelo Signorile Show, The Gist

December 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same-sex marriage cases

Arthur Leonard was interviewed on the Michelangelo Signorile Show regarding the Supreme Court’s grant of certiorari in Hollingsworth v. Perry and United States v. Windsor, the cases about same-sex marriage.

The Washington Post, “A Case for Targeted Killings”

By George F. Will
December 7, 2012

The New York Law School Law Review
Subject: Targeted Killings

“Fortunately, John Yoo of California’s Berkeley School of Law has written a lucid guide to the legal and moral calculus of combating terrorism by targeting significant enemy individuals. In “Assassination or Targeted Killings After 9/11” (New York Law School Law Review, 2011-12), Yoo correctly notes that “precise attacks against individuals” have many precedents and “further the goals of the laws of war by eliminating the enemy and reducing harm to innocent civilians.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This Op-Ed piece was published in numerous newspapers around the country, including the Boston Herald, Denver Post, New York Post, Daily Record, Ventura County Star, and Deseret News.

Tech President, “Michael Bloomberg Wants You to Design New York City’s Payphone of the Future”

By Miranda Neubauer
December 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck
Subject: NYC Payphone

“New York City’s new payphones may be so different that the term ‘payphone’ will no longer apply, according to Rahul Merchant, the city’s chief information and innovation officer. The city has launched a contest calling for new ways to use the payphone’s connectivity and power source as a way for citizens to access information and navigate the city using modern technology. The judges are John Borthwick, founder & CEO of betaworks, Majora Carter, CEO of Startup Box, Jason Goodman, CEO and co-founder of 3rd Ward, Ben Kaufman, founder and CEO of Quirky, CEO & Chief Old Person of DoSomething.org, and Beth Noveck, founder of the White House Open Government Initiative.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Q&A: Larry Lederman”

By Jeff Storey
December 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty Lawrence Lederman
Subject: Q&A

“For decades, Larry Lederman, 77, was one of the busiest corporate and mergers and acquisitions lawyers in the country, shaping major developments in corporate law such as ‘leveraged recapitalization’ technique.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Daily Caller, “A Bad Disabled-Rights Treaty.”

By Walter Olson
December 4, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin
Subject: Disabled-rights Treaty

“But — advocates say — consider how toothless the actual enforcement is sure to be! New York Law School professor Michael Perlin, who has decried disparate treatment of mentally ill persons as the ill effect of a prejudicial syndrome he calls ‘sanism,’ has argued hopefully that the convention could revolutionize the legal rights of the mentally ill.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in PrawfslBlawg, and on the Cato Institute’s website.

Publishers Weekly, “Appeal Filings Outline Authors Guild’s Objections to HathiTrust Opinion”

By Andrew Albanese
December 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Appeal Filings

“With a new round of filings hitting the docket last week, the Authors Guild appeal of Judge Harold Baer’s landmark copyright decision in the the HathiTrust case is underway. In his ruling Baer held that the Authors Guild lacked ‘statutory standing’ to bring suit. Specifically, the court found that because the Copyright Act states that only ‘legal or beneficial’ owners are entitled to sue for infringement, other parties are therefore excluded. The net effect: the Authors Guild, as it stands, is now ‘permanently barred from bringing copyright lawsuits on behalf of its members,’ explained New York Law School’s James Grimmelmann.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Information Today.

Michelangelo Signorile Show, The Gist

December 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same-Sex Marriage Cases Pending at the United States Supreme Court

Arthur Leonard was interviewed on the Micheleangelo Signorile Show on SiriusRadio about the same-sex marriage cases pending at the United States Supreme Court, as well as a recent federal court ruling in Nevada rejecting a constitutional challenge to that state’s ban on same-sex marriage.

To view this article in full click here.

Wharton@Work, “For the Win: How Game Thinking Can Revolutionize Your Business”

December 2012 Newsletter

NYLS Faculty Dan Hunter
Subject: Book Review

“Gamification’s critics call it hype, pointing to early, simple uses that mostly involve adding virtual badges and points to anything and everything. But authors Kevin Werbach and Dan Hunter, both professors, lawyers, and World of Warcraft players, say the nay-sayers are missing the big picture. In their new book For The Win:How Game Thinking Can Revolutionize Your Business, Werbach and Hunter argue that it’s much more than ‘just drizzling these elements onto a business process like caramel syrup on a sundae.’”

Foreign Policy, “The FP Top 100 Global Thinkers”

December 2012 Issue

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck
Subject: Global Thinkers

“Foreign Policy presents a unique portrait of 2012’s global marketplace of ideas and the thinkers who make them. When U.S. President Barack Obama issued a memorandum on his first full day in office to make government more transparent and open, it was no coincidence he tapped Beth Noveck to lead the unprecedented initiative.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Jerry Finkelstein, Former Law Journal Publisher, Dies at 96”

By John Caher
November 30, 2012

NYLS Alum Jerry Finkelstein ‘85
Subject: Obituary

“For at least two decades, an eclectic group of high-brow, one-time movers and shakers met to reminisce, smoke cigars, argue, agree, solve the world’s problems, invent new problems and share the blessing that was the friendship of former New York Law Journal publisher Jerry Finkelstein.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The New York Times.

E&E Daily, “Energy Panel to Review Clean Air Act in a Postelection World.”

By Jean Chemnick
November 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty David Schoenbrod
Subject: Clean Air Act

“When House Energy and Power Subcommittee Chairman Ed Whitfield kicked off his series of forums on the Clean Air Act in July, the Kentucky Republican said they might pave the way for passage of an amendment to the landmark environmental law in the next Congress, when he hoped Republicans would have a stronger legislative hand. David Schoenbrod, a professor at New York Law School and one of the authors, said in an interview that he had met with both Whitfield and his staff to share his ideas.”

This article available by subscription only.

InnovateGov, “Experts Predict Public Sector Will Embrace Gamification”

By Michael Sean Comerford
November 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty Dan Hunter
Subject: Gamification

“The notion that managers should think more like game designers isn’t new, but experts in the gamification field now predict that game theory principles will catch on best among managers in Federal, state and local government, as well as non-profits. According to professors Dan Hunter and Kevin Werbach, authors of the bestselling book “For The Win: How Game Thinking Can Revolutionize Your Business,” gamification is a concept managers should heed if they want to revolutionize their operations, particularly within Federal and state government programs.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Practical Measures to Control Annulments in Investor-State Arbitration Awards”

By Tai-Heng Cheng and Lucas Bento
November 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty Tai-Heng Cheng
Subject: Annulments

“Tai-Heng Cheng, a partner at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, and Lucas Bento, an associate at the firm, write: Given the key role of ICSID arbitration in providing a venue for foreign investors and host states to resolve their disputes, criticisms of ICSID annulments must be taken seriously.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Death Penalty Blog, “Terry Lenamon Shares His Thoughts About New Film “West of Memphis”: Every Judge, Prosecutor, and Capital Defense Lawyer Needs to See This Movie”

By Terry Lenamon & Reba Kennedy
November 24, 2012

NYLS’s Program in Law & Journalism
Subject: Damien Echols event

“We’ve covered the case of the West Memphis Three here on the blog in a series of posts going back over the years and in the past month, we’ve had several posts urging people to see the documentary based upon this Death Row case out of Arkansas, “West of Memphis.” No need to go back over those details here. Today, Terry Lenamon shares with you his thoughts on this documentary, which he has already seen in an advanced screening up at the New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Artsnapper, “Butterflies: Animals or Art?”

November 24, 2012

New York Law School’s Legal As She Is Spoke
Subject: Blog reposted

“By LASIS Staff Artist Damien Hirst has never found favor amongst animal rights activists. He earned his reputation through his exhibit of a formaldehyde-soaked shark and sculpture of a severed cow’s head.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Digital Age with Jim Zirin, “How the Internet is Transforming the Global Landscape”

November 21, 2012

NYLS Faculty Molly Land
Subject: Internet Laws

“With Internet censorship spiking, the U.S. has become increasingly concerned that technology will undermine freedom of expression. Law Professor Molly Land tells Jim that a 1966 international treaty on civil and political rights was prescient in providing a digital framework for protecting human rights around the world.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Thomson Reuters, “Summary Judgments for November 20”

By Erin Geiger Smith
November 20, 2012

NYLS’s Program in Law and Journalism
Subject: Damien Echols event

“The West Memphis Three, the three men who spent almost two decades in prison for the murders of three boys in Arkansas, were released last year after a long-running campaign to prove their innocence. Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley gained their freedom in part because of new DNA evidence, even though Arkansas officials say the 1993 case is technically closed.”

The LASIS blog article, “A Special Day at New York Law School” was republished on Zimbio.

The Huffington Post, “Ilana Hochman, Law Student, Goes From Sneakers To Sleeker With Not-Boring Workwear Makeover”

By Christina Anderson
November 19, 2012

NYLS Student Ilana Hochman
Subject: Workwear Makeover

“Brooklyn native Ilana Hochman spends a lot of time in the library. As a second-year law student at New York Law School in Tribeca, she lives in skinny jeans, oversized sweaters and Converse sneakers — perfect attire for spending hours hunched over library books.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The National Law Journal, “A Real World Approach to Diversity”

By Dorothy A. Brown
November 19, 2012

New York Law School Law Review’s Diversity Report
Subject: Law school faculty hiring

“Law school faculty hiring has been in the news of late. Consider that the results of a New York Law School study of the nation’s law reviews showed a correlation between the number of women and faculty of color with the number of women and students of color on their law reviews.”

To view this article in full, click here.

John Lothian Newsletter, “Regulatory Changes: A Pretty Picture For Gross Margining”

By Jon Matte
November 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ron Filler
Subject: The Dodd-Frank Act

“The Dodd-Frank Act has addressed numerous risks in the financial markets. Ron Filler, a Professor at New York Law School, says one provision, called gross margining, could alleviate segregated customer account risk, starting in January 2013. “

To view this article in full, click here.

The Huffington Post, “How We Win”

By Kris Franklin and Craig Fleishman
November 15, 2012

NYLS Faculty Kris Franklin
Subject: Presidential Election

“Karl Rove notwithstanding, we can all agree Barack Obama won last week’s election. Since then we’ve watched with amusement as conservative pundits have struggled to minimize the significance of election results that did not match their predictions.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Q&A: Karen Artz Ash”

By Christine Simmons
November 16, 2012

NYLS Adjunct Karen Artz Ash
Subject: Q&A

“Karen Artz Ash, national co-head of Katten Muchin Rosenman’s intellectual property practice, has attended New York fashion week shows for the past nine years.”

To view this article in full, click here.

iStockAnalyst, “What Really Happened When Lehman Failed… and Why Spain Will be Much Worse”

By Graham Summers
November 15, 2012

NYLS Faculty Kenneth Kettering
Subject: Post-Lehman

“Countless pages have been written about why Lehman caused the system to almost implode. It turns out that Lehman, like other big dealers, was running a perfectly legal but highly risky game moving money from firm to firm. It used the collateral from one trading partner to fund more deals with other firms. The same $100 million collected in one deal can be used for many other transactions. ‘Firms basically can use (the money) as their own collateral for anything they want,’ says Kenneth Kettering, a former derivatives lawyer and currently a professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

CNET, “Cable Companies Say They Won’t Disconnect Accused Pirates”

By Declan McCullagh
November 15, 2012

NYLS Faculty Molly Land
Subject: INET Forum

“Verizon and Time Warner Cable said today they won’t pull the plug on customers accused of piracy through a forthcoming ‘six strikes’ program. Molly Land, assistant professor of law at New York Law School, which hosted today’s event, said that there’s enough ambiguity in the so-called memorandum of understanding (PDF) between Internet providers and copyright holders to permit disconnection.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Risk.net, “Risk USA: Cross-border Conflicts Could Leave Firms Unable to Comply”

November 14, 2012

NYLS Faculty Houman Shadab
Subject: Cross-border conflicts

This article available by subscription only.

The New Yorker, “Was Petraeus Borked?”

By Peter Maass
November 14, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Petraeus

“In 1987, when Judge Robert Bork was enmeshed in a partisan struggle over his Supreme Court nomination, a reporter for an alternative weekly in Washington, D.C., got a tip that the judge was a patron of a local video store. As the law professor and privacy expert James Grimmelmann tweeted the other day, ‘The scandal isn’t what’s illegal; the scandal is what’s legal (or what the FBI thinks is legal).’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “Authors Guild Appeals Loss in Book Scanning Case”

By Andrew Albanese
November 14, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Book Scanning Case

“The Authors Guild has notified the court that it will appeal Judge Harold Baer’s landmark October 10 ruling in the Authors Guild vs. Hathitrust case. As New York Law School professor and PW contributing editor James Grimmelmann observed, Baer’s decision didn’t even seem close. ‘On every substantive copyright issue, HathiTrust won,’ he observed.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal. “Students Making Up Lost Days as Impact of Storm Lingers”

By Tania Karas
November 13, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell
Subject: Rescheduling classes after the hurricane

“As Sandy roared into the metropolitan area on Oct. 29, hundreds of law students in the region were forced to put aside strict study schedules. To assist those with difficult or impossible commutes, 11 law schools in the metropolitan area have opened their doors to students and faculty from other schools who can’t make it to their home schools to work and study. The coalition came together after a conference call of deans organized by Anthony Crowell, the dean of New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Smith College Alumni Publication, “Smith Women in Public Office”

November 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: Women in Office

“Deborah N. Archer ‘93, professor of law at New York Law School, was recently appointed Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the school. As associate dean, she will work to develop the school’s curriculum and help drive efforts at innovation in legal education.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “Going in Circles With Hate Speech”

By Stanley Fish
November 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Hate speech

“No topic is more frequently debated with less resolution than hate speech. Hate speech ‘violates the dignity of the members of the target group’ who lead ‘ghettoized and isolated lives with a knock-down effect on their children’s education and career choices.’ Not necessarily, says Nadine Strossen, a professor of law and a past president of the A.C.L.U. We are not, she insists, ‘automatically diminished just because some bigot says something negative about us.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Death Penalty Blog, “Special Screening of New Film- WEST OF MEMPHIS, Coming Soon to a Theater Near You.”

By Terry Lenamon & Reba Kennedy
November 9, 2012

NYLS- PLJ’s Damien Echols
Subject: Movie Screening

“The West Memphis Three were freed a little over a year ago after lots of support and efforts to make the public aware of what was happening to these three men. Terry Lenamon has been invited to special screenings of Peter Jackson’s film, co-produced by Fran Walsh and Damiel Echols, at the New York Law School on November 17, where the documentary will be shown as well as a panel discussion involving those involved in the film as well as the lawyers in the underlying case. “

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Crain’s New York Business, AM New York, New York Daily News, CityGuide New York, NYC.com, NY Luxury, Zvents, Eventful, Tribeca Trib, Tribeca Citizen, Activists Resource, Club Free Time, Thought Gallery, NY Activist, Yahoo/Upcoming, Stamford Advocate, Westport News, and Greenwich Citizen.

Reuters, “Analysis: Gay marriage votes could sway U.S. Supreme Court.”

By Terry Baynes
November 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Gay marriage

“After victories for same-sex marriage initiatives in Maryland, Maine and Washington state this week, the two sides in the national debate over gay marriage are positioning for advantage as the issue moves toward the U.S. Supreme Court. ‘The court can’t live in a world where the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional in the Northeast and constitutional everywhere else,’ the ACLU’s Esseks said. This is especially true after Tuesday’s votes, because with more states allowing same-sex marriage, more people are potentially adversely affected by the Defense of Marriage Act, said Arthur Leonard, a professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Economist, “More Than Just a Game.”

November 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty Dan Hunter
Subject: Video games

“Despite their reputation for violence, not all video games are about zapping aliens or shooting zombies. Plenty offer gentler amusements, like tending a virtual farm or playing a relaxing round of golf. The latest book on the subject, ‘For the Win’, comes from Kevin Werbach and Dan Hunter, from the Wharton Business School and the New York Law School respectively.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Marketplace Tech, Interview with James Grimmelmann

November 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Microsoft patent application

James Grimmelmann interviewed on Marketplace Tech regarding a Microsoft patent application for a device that watches you as you watch TV and charges based on the number of people viewing.

The interview was aired 11/9/12 on KPCC-FM 89.3, Southern California Public Radio.

Reuters, “Analysis: Gay marriage votes could sway U.S. Supreme Court.”

By Terry Baynes
November 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Gay marriage

“After victories for same-sex marriage initiatives in Maryland, Maine and Washington state this week, the two sides in the national debate over gay marriage are positioning for advantage as the issue moves toward the U.S. Supreme Court. ‘The court can’t live in a world where the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional in the Northeast and constitutional everywhere else,’ the ACLU’s Esseks said. This is especially true after Tuesday’s votes, because with more states allowing same-sex marriage, more people are potentially adversely affected by the Defense of Marriage Act, said Arthur Leonard, a professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Huffington Post, “The Debate Over Capital Punishment .”

By Burke E. Strunsky
November 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty Robert Blecker
Subject: Capital Punishment

“On November 6, 2012, California, the state with the most inmates on death row, was a hair away from becoming the 18th state in the U.S. to ban capital punishment and the sixth state to do so in the last five years. New York Law School Professor Robert Blecker, a respected and central figure in the issue, is an outspoken proponent of capital punishment.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Brian Leiter’s Law School Reports, “Blogging a Faculty Meeting?”

By Brian Leiter
November 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Faculty Meeting Blog

“Paul Campos, of self-promotion fame, has now written what purports to be a description of both the content and then the vote of a faculty meeting at his school, the University of Colorado at Boulder, concerning the expansion of its LLM program. James Grimmelman (New York Law School) asks, ‘Might it not also be the case that his colleagues were reluctant to discuss the proposal at the faculty meeting out of a concern that whatever they said would be published on Professor Campos’s blog?’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Dan Pink, “The Hows and Whys of Gamification: 4 Questions for Kevin Werbach”

By Daniel H. Pink
November 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty Dan Hunter
Subject: Gamification

“Gamification. It’s one of the year’s top memes. Alas, like any white-hot meme, it’s often hard to sort the heat from the light. Thank heavens, then, for For the Win, a new book by Wharton’s Kevin Werbach and New York Law School’s Dan Hunter.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Marketplace Tech.

Thane Rosenbaum, “A Great Night With Good Night and Good Luck.”

By Jose I. Ortiz
November 7, 2012

NYLS Student Jose Ortiz
Subject: Blog reposted from Legal As She is Spoke blog

“Because we’re accustomed to a packed house at the Forum on Law, Culture & Society’s films and post-screening discussions, when I saw several empty seats on the chilly evening of October 22, I worried that I might have chosen the wrong night to attend.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Downtown Express, “Voters Swarm Downtown Poll Sites.”

By Jess Scanlon
November 6, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Poll sites

“All polling places in Manhattan opened at 6 a.m. for Election Day in Lower Manhattan, but before noon, some polling locations were already crowded with lines of voters spilling out into the streets at two Tribeca locations, New York Law School and P.S. 234, and the Tweed Courthouse by City Hall.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Thane Rosenbaum, “John Adams and the Rule of Law.”

By Will Bartholomew
November 2, 2012

NYLS 2L Will Bartholomew
Subject: Blog reposted from Legal As She is Spoke

“On Friday, October 19 Fordham Law School’s Forum on Law, Culture, and Society kicked off its annual film festival at the HBO Theater with a screening of Part One of the mini-series “John Adams.” The evening took on a hint of Hollywood gala as smartly-dressed patrons mingled over drinks and appetizers in the theater’s foyer before the show with the event’s guests-of-honor, Kirk Ellis, who wrote the screenplay for the series, and Judge Denny Chin, of the Federal Court of Appeals.”

To view this article in full, click here.

USA Today, “Harsh Punishments Rare for Drug Compounding Mistakes.”

By Peter Eisler
November 1, 2012

The Center for Justice & Democracy at NYLS
Subject: Punishments for Pharmacies

“The legal landscape is littered with charges of negligence and misconduct by compounding pharmacies such as the one implicated in the nation’s ongoing meningitis outbreak, but they rarely result in tough punishments, an examination of legal records shows. Civil lawsuits are a powerful tool ‘to make sure the most dangerous compounding pharmacies are forced out of business,’ says Joanne Doroshow, executive director of the Center for Justice & Democracy at New York Law School.’

To view this article in full, click here.

Dispute Resolution Journal, “What Arbitrators Need to Know About Anti-Discrimination Protection for Transgender Employees”

By Arthur Leonard
November Issue

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Anti-Discrimination Prosecution for Transgender Employees

“On April 20, 2012, the Equal Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued a unanimous decision holding that ‘a complaint of discrimination based on gender identity, change of sex, and/or transgender status is cognizable under Title VII’ of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as a sex discrimination claim.”

This article available by subscription only.

SI Parent, “International Adoption Basics.”

By Peter Czarnocha ’12
November Issue

NYLS Alum Peter Czarnocha ’12
Subject: International adoption

“Adopting a child from abroad can bring you incredible joy, but the process can seem daunting. Understanding some of the basic steps involved may help you decide whether, when and how to go forward.”

Available by subscription only.

New York Law Journal, “Law Schools.”

October 29, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell
Subject: Interviews with Law Deans

“In this edition of the New York Law Journal’s Law School special section, we turned to the deans of New York’s 15 law schools and asked them to share their unique perspective on such topics as rising tuition costs, the newly implemented 50-hour pro bono requirement and career prospects for new graduates. Anthony W. Crowell, Dean and President; Professor of Law, responds: Lawyers are leaders, and constitute the ranks of middle and high level management, in government and business alike, and we need to ensure that our law schools prepare students for these roles and that our profession values these contributions.”

To view this article in full, click here.

City Journal, “Permanent Punitive Segregation”

By Robert Blecker
October 25, 2012

NYLS Faculty Robert Blecker
Subject: Death Penalty

“In recent years, a number of states- New York, New Jersey, New Mexico, Illnois, and, in 2012, Connecticut- abolished the death penalty, replacing it with life without parole (LWOP) and ending the legislative debate about appropriate punishment for the most grievous crimes.”

This article available by subscription only.

The Village Voice, “Goodbye, Affirmative Action?”

By Brenda Iasevoli
October 24, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: Affirmative Action

“On October 10, the Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that could spell the end of affirmative action at U.S. universities. Deborah Archer, associate dean of academic affairs at New York Law School, sees firsthand the need for classroom diversity.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Futures Magazine, “What the experts think about MF Global”

By Daniel P. Collins
October 24, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ron Filler
Subject: Experts on MF Global

“The MF Global debacle rocked the futures industry and its full impact is yet to be felt. We talked to some industry veterans regarding the fallout of MF Global in the industry and its regulatory processes. Ron Filler: The recent MF Global bankruptcy has raised a number of regulatory issues that the industry as a whole, both domestically and globally, must address and resolve.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Capital New York, “What Would a Super PAC Want with the 2013 Mayor’s Race Anyway?”

By Reid Pillifant
October 22, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Mayor’s Race

“At a panel discussion on the possible role of super PACs in 2013 last week, Michael Bloomberg’s former campaign manager cast some doubt about how active the mayor’s fortune might be in determining his successor. ‘For 2013, I think there’s lots of uncertainty about what can be done, what can’t be done—we’re hearing that tonight—so that may limit what you see next year,’ said Bradley Tusk, who managed the mayor’s $100-million campaign in 2009, at a discussion at New York Law School on Thursday night.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Chronicle of Higher Education, “Judge’s Decision Could Clear Path for Wider Use of Digital Library”

By Jennifer Howard
October 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Digital Library

“HathiTrust, an online academic library that includes more than 10 million works, won a legal victory this month, strengthening the cause of fair use. Library commentators, fair-use champions, and advocates for the visually disabled celebrated the decision. “On every substantive issue, HathiTrust won,” said James Grimmelmann, a professor of law at New York Law School, in an analysis posted on his blog.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “Unintended Consequences In the HathiTrust Case”

By Andrew Albanese
October 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: HathiTrust Case

“Digitization proponents and library advocates hailed the October 10 decision in the Authors Guild v. HathiTrust case as an unequivocal, emphatic victory for fair use. In the ruling, “Judge Baer added another brick to the wall of precedents holding that search engine indexing is a fair use,” James Grimmelmann, New York Law School professor and PW contributing editor, wrote on the PWxyz blog.”

To view this article in full, click here.

National Law Journal, “Women Lag in Top Law Review Jobs”

By Karen Sloan
October 19, 2012

NYLS’s Law Review’s Diversity Report
Subject: Women in Top Law Review Jobs

“Women remain underrepresented in top law review leadership positions, according to data from New York Law School and Ms. JD, a nonprofit organization that supports the advancement of women in the legal profession.”

To view this article in full, click here.

This news also appeared in National JuristTaxProf BlogABA Journal New York Law JournalMichigan Lawyers Weekly, and Above the Law.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, “Brooklyn Law School Sets Standard for Prosecutorial Clinics”

By Charisma L. Miller
October 18, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Prosecution Clinic

“A recent New York Law Journal article lauded New York Law School’s collaboration with the Manhattan District Attorney’s office in the formation of a new prosecution clinic.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Downtown Express, ‘‘Jenga’ Building Doesn’t Fly with Local Residents”

By Jess Scanlon
October 17, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: ‘Jenga’ Building in Tribeca

“The notion of a new high-rise residential building in Tribeca is not sitting well among neighborhood residents. The building’s location at 56 Leonard St. is adjacent to New York Law School, which previously owned the land.”

To view this article in full, click here.

I-CONnect, “Local Injustice: Why We Shouldn’t Forget about Saif Gaddafi”

By Ruti Teitel
October 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: Saif Gaddafi

“In the London newspaper the Daily Mail, Saif Gaddafi’s longtime girlfriend, Orly Weinerman, has asked that Saif be spared prosecution in Libya and sent instead to the International Criminal Court (ICC) in the Hague.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Circuit Panel Hears Cases at New York Law School”

By Rick Kopstein
October 15, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Circuit Panel Hears Cases

“The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit moved off-site on Oct. 12, as Judges Robert Katzmann, Dennis Jacobs and Debra Ann Livingston, from left, heard oral arguments at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Christian Science Monitor, “Modern-Day Puritans Wring Hands Over Zumba Madam’s List of Shame”

By Patrik Jonsson
October 13, 2012

NYLS’s Justice Action Center
Subject: JAC in Modern-day Puritans wring hands over Zumba Madam’s list of shame

“In the big scheme of things, the names of the “johns” who allegedly hired Kennebunk, Maine, Zumba dance instructor Alexis Wright for sex are simply a matter of public record if solicitation charges are leveled. The US public, skeptical about the rehabilitative effects of prison, has largely applauded such sentences, according to the New York Law School’s Justice Action Center.”

To view this article in full, click here.

JD Journal, “Harvard Law School Launches Video Interviewing of J.D. Applicants “

October 13, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Videoconferencing

“On Thursday, Harvard Law School announced that it would be using videoconferencing technology to conduct interviews of J.D. candidates seeking admission to the program. Videoconferencing is already being used by other law schools in their admissions’ process with New York Law School being the first law school to start using the method, followed by Northwestern University Law School and Vanderbilt Law School and others.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Chronicle of Higher Education, “Universities Are Vast Copy Machines—and That’s a Good Thing”

By Siva Vaidhyanathan
October 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Cases on copyright infringement and digital books.

“Universities are and have always been vast copy machines. As James Grimmelmann, a professor of law at New York Law School, has written, these three cases mark clear victories for universities.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Media Post, “Netflix Agrees To Put Captions On Streaming Video”

By Wendy Davis
October 11, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Captions on Netflix Streaming

“Netflix has agreed to offer closed captioning on all streaming video by September of 2014 in order to settle a lawsuit filed by the National Association of the Deaf. Assuming that other judges follow Baer’s reasoning, companies like Netflix are likely to be protected from liability for offering closed captioning, according to copyright expert James Grimmelmann, a professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Post Standard, “Candlelight vigil held in Clinton Square to support Onondaga Nation’s land rights case”

By Sarah Moses
October 10, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals

“Community members attended a candlelight vigil Wednesday night in Clinton Square in Syracuse to show support for the Onondaga Nation as nation leaders prepare to present their land rights case to the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals. The Second Circuit Court of Appeals will meet at 9 a.m. Friday at the New York Law School in New York City.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Staten Island Advance, “NYC Council, Debi Rose, scrutinize NYPD’s ‘stop-and-frisk’ policy”

By Deborah Young
October 10, 2012

New York Law School Program in Law & Journalism
Subject: Stop-and-Frisk Policy

“The tactics used by New York police officers as they patrol the city streets — which stirred controversy earlier this year — are now coming under legislative scrutiny. Meanwhile Councilwoman Debi Rose (D-North Shore) — an outspoken critic of ‘stop-and-frisk’ is co-hosting a symposium with the New York Law School Program in Law & Journalism entitled ‘Beyond the Rhetoric: A Dialogue on Stop, Question & Frisk’ Tuesday, Oct. 16 at 6 p.m. at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “James Grimmelmann Joining ‘PW’ as Contributing Editor”

October 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Grimmelmann named Contributing Editor

“James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law at New York Law School, has joined Publishers Weekly as a contributing editor for legal affairs. Grimmelmann frequently writes about intellectual property, virtual worlds, search engines, online privacy, and other topics in computer and Internet law, and is considered one of the foremost experts on the Google Settlement and its implications.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in MediaBistro

The Chronicle of Higher Education, “Judge Hands HathiTrust Digital Repository a Win in Fair-Use Case”

By Jennifer Howard
October 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: HathiTrust

“Academic libraries’ indexing of digitized works counts as fair use. James Grimmelmann, a professor of law at New York Law School, observed on his blog, The Laboratorium: ‘The opinion doesn’t even make it seem like a close case. On every substantive copyright issue, HathiTrust won.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Inside Higher Ed and MediaPost.

The National Jurist, “Why We Need Race Conscious Admissions.”

By Deborah Archer
October 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: Race Conscious Admissions

“On Oct. 10th the United States Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Fisher v. the University of Texas at Austin, the first case the Court has heard addressing race conscious admissions since its landmark decision in Grutter v. Bollinger, 2003.”

New York Law Journal, District Attorney, NYLS Team Up in Prosecution Clinic

By Andrew Keshner
October 9, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: NYLS and District Attorney team up in prosecution clinic

“The Manhattan District Attorney’s office and New York Law School are teaming up to have students prosecute non-violent misdemeanors and violations in the Manhattan Criminal Court’s Quality of Life part. The clinical program announced Oct. 5 will allow students to engage in plea negotiations, prepare witnesses and participate in suppression hearings and bench trials under the supervision of assistant district attorneys and adjunct professors.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in NY1 and Streetsblog.

Today’s Workplace, “Losing My Religion”

By Jose Ortiz
October 8, 2012

NYLS Student Jose Ortiz
Subject: Blog reposted from Legal As She Is Spoke

“Considering how many talking points in the 2012 election have had to do with religion (Romney’s Mormonism, the morality of the Ryan budget, and Christian views on abortion and gay marriage) it’s easy to forget that in some countries, religion and party-politics are considered a private matter, not to be discussed in polite society.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Time, “Google Books Deal Bolsters Dream of Universal Bookstore”

By Sam Gustin
October 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google Book Deal

“Google’s deal to settle a seven-year conflict with five major publishers over the search giant’s book-scanning initiative is a milestone in the publishing industry’s grinding transition from print books to e-books. ‘In the last few years, Google and the publishers have made their peace; this is just the treaty-signing ceremony,’ James Grimmelmann, a copyright expert at New York Law School who has closely followed the case, wrote on his blog.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Bloomberg Businessweek.

Huffington Post, “The Soft Bigotry of Low Expectations: Why Affirmative Action Still Matters”

By Deborah Archer
October 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: Race Conscious Admissions

“On Oct. 10, the United States Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Fisher v. the University of Texas at Austin, its first consideration of race-conscious admissions since its 2003 landmark decision Grutter v. Bollinger upholding the constitutionality of the University of Michigan’s affirmative action program.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “Google Deal Gives Publishers a Choice: Digitize or Not”

By Claire Cain Miller
October 4, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Publishers choose if Google digitizes

“After seven years of litigation, Google and book publishers said on Thursday that they had reached a settlement to allow publishers to choose whether Google digitizes their books and journals. ‘They had this lawsuit hanging around for years, and basically the publishers have all moved on,’ said James Grimmelmann, a professor at New York Law School who has closely followed the case. ‘They are selling digitally now. That’s the future. This just memorializes the transition.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Inside Higher EdArs TechnicaThe Chronicle of Higher EducationComputer WorldInvestor’s Business DailyNews ObserverThe Commercial Appeal, and San Jose Mercury News.

The Gist, “Today on the Signorile Show”

October 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Appearance on Michelangelo Signorile Show

“Guest / 4:30pm EST – Yesterday, the Supreme Court started its judicial session and after last years ruling on healthcare, many are curious as to what kinds of cases SCOTUS will be discussing this year — and the ones they may not, including Prop 8 and DOMA. Arthur Leonard, professor of law with New York Law School returns to the show to discuss where some of these cases stand.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Law School Magazine, “From 1L Lawyering, Learning How to Write”

By Graham Reed
October 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty Doni Gewirtzman
Subject: Writing

“Cristina Alger ’07 admits that before she graduated from college, she had little grounding in finance other than balancing her checkbook. The first paper she submitted to her professor, Doni Gewirtzman, came back covered in red and with a B-minus. Alger was shocked. Gewirtzman guessed that she had been an English major in college. Alger recollects, “He said to me, ‘Ugh, you English majors put so many adjectives in front of everything.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Thomsons Reuters, “NY Judge Grants Custody to Lesbian Adoptive Mother”

By Daniel Wiessner
October 1, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Custody battle

“A Manhattan judge has awarded custody of a lesbian couple’s 5-year-old daughter to the adoptive mother, instead of the biological mother. But the decision is likely not the first of its kind in the country, as courts routinely grant custody based on the best interests of children, and not biology, said Arthur Leonard, a professor at New York Law School and an expert on sexuality and the law.”

New York Law Journal, “New York Law Holds Moot Court”

October 1, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Moot Court Competition

“The judges at this year’s Charles W. Froessel Intramural Moot Court Competition at New York Law School—left to right, New York Assemblyman Daniel O’Donnell, FIRE Attorney Samatha K. Harris, Third Circuit Judge D. Brooks Smith, N.J. District Judge Joseph Irenas and NYLS Professor Susan Abraham—consider the arguments of moot court competitors on whether and how Tinker v. Des Moines School District should apply to online speech.”

To view this article in full, click here.

MSNBC’s Up with Chris Hayes, “Elise Boddie on Affirmative Action Before the US Supreme Court”

September 30, 2012

NYLS Faculty Elise Boddie
Subject: Affirmative Action

“On September 30, Acting Director of Litigation at LDF Elise Boddie, discussed on MSNBC’s “Up with Chris Hayes” the future of affirmative action and the Supreme Court in the upcoming Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin case.”

To view this video, click here.

New York Law Journal, “City Hall Experience Gives New York Law Dean an Edge”

By Brendan Pierson
September 27, 2012

Dean Anthony Crowell
Subject: New Dean with an edge

“As a former top advisor to New York City’s mayor, Anthony Crowell sees himself as ideally positioned to take over New York Law School—or, as he calls it, ‘New York’s Law School.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

TechPresident, “What the Early 20th Century and the SOPA/PIPA Fight Have In Common”

By Nick Judd
September 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck
Subject: Book event at NYLS

“As it happens, there’s a connection between the SOPA/PIPA fight and sexuality and politics in 1920s Austria. That’s the argument Beth Noveck made Monday at New York Law School, during an evening book event Personal Democracy Media hosted to discuss Steven Johnson’s new book, ‘Future Perfect: The Case for Progress in the Networked Age.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Corporate Counsel, “PTO Adds Crowdsourcing Tool to Patent Application Process”

By Lisa Shuchman
September 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck and Peer to Patent
Subject: Patent Application Process

“Applying for a new patent? Take note: The public is watching. The Patent and Trademark Office has teamed up with Stack Exchange, a popular Q&A website for IT professionals and experts in a variety of areas, to make it easy for technology buffs, software geeks, and others with specialized knowledge to check out any new application and question whether it really deserves a patent. The concept is based on an earlier pilot project spearheaded by New York Law School professor Beth Noveck. In that project, called Peer to Patent, Noveck and the PTO brought together experts in certain fields to comment on select patent applications.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Truthdig Radio, “Neo-Nazis in the U.S. Army”

September 24, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Radio Interview

“Last time on Truthdig Radio in association with KPFK: unconventional recruiting in the military, balancing free speech with cultural sensitivity in the Middle East, how to survive a plague and Robert Scheer on the freeloaders whose votes Mitt Romney is apparently not expecting.”

To listen to this interview, click here.

The GW Hatchet, “Lerman reaffirms support for race-conscious admissions at panel”

By Kristen Barnes
September 24, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: Panel on Race-Conscious Admissions

“A top administrator underlined the University’s support for race-conscious admissions Monday, less than three weeks before the Supreme Court begins arguments that could decide the fate of affirmative action. Throughout the panel, New York Law School professor Deborah Archer denounced racism and its prevalence within schools.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Wall Street & Technology,” Ex-Goldman Sachs Programmer Charged, Again, Over Trading Code Theft”

By Grant McCool
September 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty Eugene Cerruti
Subject: Trading Code Theft

“A former Goldman Sachs Group Inc computer programmer who was cleared in February of federal charges of stealing high-frequency trading code has been hit with new charges arising from the same activity. Sergey Aleynikov, the former programmer, now faces charges brought by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a new twist in a case first filed by U.S. federal prosecutors in July 2009. Vance, however, is trying to prosecute Aleynikov under New York state law, and that could raise double jeopardy concerns, according to Eugene Cerruti, a professor at New York Law School who has been a federal prosecutor and public defender.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Electronic Frontier Foundation, “Do Not Track Update: From Congressional Hearings to Uproar Over Microsoft’s ‘Default’ Settings, the Fight for User Privacy Continues”

By Lee Tien
September 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Do Not Track Update

“As summer wanes, EFF and other digital rights advocates are continuing to fight for Do Not Track, a one-click browser-based signal users can turn on to tell websites not to track their online browsing habits. New York Law School Prof. James Grimmelmann discussed Do Not Track and articulated (PDF) three principles that are necessary to achieve genuine consumer choice:
• Usability—privacy interfaces must be clear and clearly disclosed.
• Reliability—a consumer who has expressed a choice is entitled to expect that it will be honored.
• Innovation for privacy—a privacy policy should encourage the development of these technologies, and protect them from interference. “

To view this article in full, click here.

The Brooklyn Spectator, “Kings of Kings honorees announced”

September 20, 2012

Dean Anthony Crowell
Subject: Dean Crowell named honoree

“The Home Reporter and The Brooklyn Spectator have announced the honorees for the upcoming second annual Kings of Kings County event, scheduled to take place on Thursday, September 27 at 8:30 a.m. at the El Caribe Country Club Caterers, 5945 Strickland Avenue in Mill Basin. This year’s honorees include Anthony W. Crowell, Dean and President, NY Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

National Jurist, “NYLS Creates Pro Bono Initiative to Comply With New State Pro Bono Requirement”

September 20, 2012

Dean Anthony Crowell and Professor Carol Buckler
Subject: NYLS’s Pro Bono Initiative

“New York Law School created a new Pro Bono Initiative designed to comply with new requirements in New York state that all new attorneys complete 50 hours of pro bono service before they can be admitted to the bar.”

To read this article in full, click here.

Ars Technica, “Patent Office Tries ‘Stack Overflow for Patents’ to Find Prior Art”

By Timothy B. Lee
September 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck & Peer to Patent
Subject: New site Ask Patents

“The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) hopes to improve patent quality by soliciting greater feedback from the general public about pending patents. The new site is inspired by peer to patent, a pilot project launched by New York Law School in 2009 to help the USPTO solicit prior art from the public.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Virtual Strategy MagazineStack Exchange and Wired.

New York Law Journal, “Lippman Unveils Rule Detailing Bar Admission Pro Bono Mandate”

By Joel Stashenko and Christine Simmons
September 20, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell and NYLS’s Pro Bono Initiative
Subject: Pro Bono Mandate

“Details of the new 50-hour pro bono requirement for applicants to the New York bar were unveiled yesterday by Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman. Anthony Crowell, dean of New York Law School, announced yesterday that his school has created a new Pro Bono Initiative to put New York Law’s clinical and experiential learning programs in line with the new mandate.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in JD Journal.

Virtual Strategy Magazine, “VentureOutNY Presents Coming to America”

September 20, 2012

NYLS Coming to America Conference
Subject: Conference details

“VentureOutNY, a liaison for international technology startups to the New York technology and venture capital communities, will present Coming To America: Immigration, Entrepreneurship and the Economy. Taking place at the New York Law School on Monday, September 24, 2012, the event will feature two expert panels: U.S. Immigration Policy & The Startup Act 2.0 and Immigration Models Abroad & The Future of U.S. Immigration Policy.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Clarion, “Law College Top 20 Most Innovative”

By Lanna Giaque
September 18, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Innovative Law Schools

“Sturm College of Law was named as one of the top 20 most innovative law schools in the U.S. by The National Jurist in their August back-to-school issue of Prelaw Magazine. Other schools receiving mention in the ranking include Stanford Law School, New York Law School and Syracuse College of Law.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Crain’s New York, “Helluva Town: Seeing the Forest for the Trees”

By Ali Elkin
September 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty Lawrence Lederman
Subject: Photography

“The photographer behind the New York Botanical Garden’s newest book is quite established—in mergers and acquisitions. In October, publisher Monacelli Press will release Magnificent Trees of the New York Botanical Garden, featuring about 200 shots by Larry Lederman, a retired partner of law firm Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy.”

To view this article in full, click here.

His photography will also be on display in the lobby of the famed Four Seasons restaurant from September 20 through December 31.

The National Law Journal, “Another Loss for Former Students who Accuse Law Schools of Fraud”

By Karen Sloan
September 14, 2012

NYLS lawsuit dismissal
Subject: Fraud cases being thrown out

“The fraud class actions targeting law schools around the country haven’t received much love from the bench. Earlier, judges in New York and Michigan dismissed cases against New York Law School and Thomas M. Cooley Law School, respectively.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in OverlawyeredLaw WeekCrain’s Chicago BusinessBalkinization, and SBM Blog.

Ethics & International Affairs, “Humanity’s Law by Ruti G. Teitel”

By Martti Koskenniemi
September 13, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: “Humanity’s Law”

“In Humanity’s Law, Ruti Teitel claims that “we lack a continuous narrative of progressive law” (p. 32), and subsequently provides us with a Whig history of international legalism from the Treaty of Westphalia to contemporary human rights law, the laws of war, and international criminal law.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Personal Notes on Lawyers”

September 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

“New York Law School Professor Deborah Archer has been appointed associate dean for academic affairs, working with faculty and administrators to develop the curriculum and help drive the law school’s efforts at innovation in legal education.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Huffington Post, “Free Speech for College Students: FIRE’S Guide Updated”

By David Moshman
September 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Free speech

“The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) has published a second edition of its outstanding Guide to Free Speech on Campus, one of its five Guides to Student Rights on Campus. The top two endorsers on its back cover are Nadine Strossen and Edwin Meese, III.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Gay City News, “Pandering in the Massachusetts Senate Race”

By Paul Schindlera
September 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Gender reassignment surgery in jail

“As Arthur S. Leonard reports , the chief judge of the US District Court for Massachusetts last week ordered that the prison system in that state provide a transgender inmate with gender reassignment surgery. Michelle Kosilek is serving a life sentence, without possibility of parole, in the murder of the woman she married while living as a man.”

To view this article in full, click here.

AOL Government, “People to Watch: Raphael Majma”

September 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck & Alum Raphael Majma ’11
Subject: Raphael Majma

“Raphael Majma was selected as a Presidential Innovation Fellow for Project OpenData as part of the new White House Presidential Innovation Fellows program. Most recently, he worked on the Initiative on Open Government Data and the Nonprofit Sector for Professor Beth S. Noveck at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

CBC Radio’s Spark, “When You Download Music, Do You Own It?”

September 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Downloading digital music

“ReDigi is a website where people can sell their legally purchased digital music files in the US, think of it like a used record store for digital music. Capitol Records is suing the website for copyright infringement and the case will be argued in a US court in early October. James Grimmelmann is a law professor at the New York Law School. He talks with Nora Young about this case which explores the question: Can we resell our legally purchased digital music files?”

To view this article in full, click here.

Inside Higher Ed, “Publishers Double Down”

By Steve Kolowich
September 11, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Appealing copyright lawsuit

“Three academic publishers and their industry allies, who in May watched their four-year copyright lawsuit against Georgia State University stomped to bits by a district court judge, have doubled down on the case, declaring on Monday that they intend to appeal to a higher court. ‘There’s very little downside to appealing,’ says James Grimmelmann, a professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

ACS Blog, “Reflecting on Impact of 9/11 on Civil Liberties; Will Supreme Court Provide Guidance on Surveillance?”

By Jeremy Leaming and
Dipal Shah
September 11, 2012

NYLS Symposium
Subject: Impact of 9/11 on Civil Liberties

“At a New York Law School symposium examining the impact the 9/11 terrorist attacks have had on civil liberties, John Yoo, former George W. Bush administration attorney who wrote memoranda supporting torture of military prisoners, declared that in the years since the devastating events ‘civil liberties have grown quite a bit.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Times Union, “Students Need the Right Sex Ed”

By Johanna Miller
September 11, 2012

Alum Johanna Miller ‘08
Subject: Sex Education

“It’s shocking what passes for sex education in classrooms across our state: A school district in western New York used a handout portraying women as ‘hazardous material.’ A district in the North Country has taught students that the vagina is a ‘sperm deposit.’ And a district outside Albany has advised students that same-sex attraction is a cause to seek counseling.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Reader Rankings 2012”

September 10, 2012

NYLS LL.M. and JD/MBA programs
Subject: Reader Rankings

“Education:

Best Banking/Bankruptcy/Tax LLM
1. New York Law School (Tax)
2. New York University School of Law (Tax)
3. St. John’s University School of Law
(Bankruptcy)

Best Other/Specialty LLM
1. New York Law School
(Financial Services Law)
2. Pace Law School (Environmental)
3. New York Law School (Real Estate)

To view this article in full, click here.

City Limits, “Learn How to Help a Child Obtain Special Immigrant Juvenile Status”

September 10, 2012

NYLS Event
Subject: Special Immigrant Juvenile Status

“There are 5,000 juvenile cases pending on the docket of New York’s Immigration Court. Too many minors face this legal process on their own because as a civil system, aliens in the U.S. are not entitled to legal counsel at government expense.”

This news also appeared in Gotham Gazette and New York Law Journal.

Medpedia, “Symposium: Freedom of Choice at the End of Life Patient’s Rights in a Shifting Legal Landscape”

By Thaddeus Mason Pope
September 9, 2012

NYLS Justice Action Center Symposium
Subject: Symposium Details

“Symposium: Freedom of Choice at the End of Life
Patient’s Rights in a Shifting Legal Landscape
A Justice Action Center Symposium
Friday, November 16, 2012
New York Law School
Cosponsored with the New York Law School Law Review and the Diane Abbey Law Center for Children and Families”

The New York Times, “Q&A- Still Awaiting Financial Statements”

By Jay Romano
September 7, 2012

NYLS Adjunct Lucas Ferrara
Subject: Real Estate Questions

“Q: I’ll be renewing my lease on Nov. 1 for one year. I’d like to move sometime next year. What will be my responsibility if I decide to move during the lease term? A: Absent a landlord’s consent to an early termination, the letter writer may be liable for the payment of the agreed-upon rent for the balance of the lease term, said Lucas A. Ferrara, a real estate lawyer and adjunct professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

First Post, “Professor Michael Perlin on ‘Sexuality and Mental Disability’’

September 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin
Subject: Sexuality and Mental Disability

“Professor Michael Perlin (New York Law School) speaks to a Taiwan human rights conference (June 2012) about ‘Sexuality and Mental Disability_ American and International Human Rights Perspectives.’”

To view this video, click here.

Downtown Express, “Longstanding Debate Flares up over Chinatown, LES Districts”

By Lincoln Anderson
September 5, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Hearing at NYLS

“Advocates turned out to testify about the shape of City Council districts covering Chinatown and the Lower East Side at the New York City Districting Commission’s first Manhattan public hearing last month. The hearing was held at New York Law School (185 W. Broadway), in front of the 15 appointed members of the Districting Commission.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Publisher’s Weekly, “As Expected, No Stay in Google Case”

By Andrew Albanese
September 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google case

“In a bit of procedural news, Judge Denny Chin last week issued an order denying an August 17 request by Google to stay the Authors Guild’s current lawsuit against them until after the Second Circuit Court of Appeals rules on Judge Chin’s decision to certify the case as a class action. Still, a reversal at this stage denying class action status could impact the litigation. ‘I would wonder about the case’s financing,’ New York Law School’s James Grimmelmann recently told PW. ‘The only prospect to recover the lawsuit’s costs would be to hope for a decisive victory followed by fee-shifting, while at the same time the plaintiffs would be exposed to the prospect of having to pay Google’s (by now quite significant) legal fees if they lost.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, “Six African Americans Named to Key Administrative Posts in Higher Education”

September 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: New Appointment

“Deborah N. Archer is the new associate dean for academic affairs at New York Law School. She has been a professor at the law school since 2003 and is the director of the law school’s Racial Justice Project.”

To view this article in full, click here.

National Jurist, “America’s 20 Most Innovative Law Schools”

By Michelle Weyenberg
September 2012 Issue

New York Law School
Subject: NYLS among 20 most innovative law schools

“This past spring the American Bar Association released its own employment data for the first time. At first blush, the data seemed very similar to what the National Association of Law Placement has reported for the past 20 years. “

This article available by subscription only.
This news also mentioned in DU Today, and Tax Prof Blog.

Innovation, “How Copyright Has Driven Online Streaming Innovators Insane”

By Mike Masnick
August 31, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Copyright Law

“A little over four years ago, we wrote about the Second Circuit appeals court’s ruling in the case over the legality of Cablevision’s remote DVR. As we said at the time, the court came to the right result — the remote DVR was perfectly legal — but had to twist itself into all sorts of crazy contortions to make that argument fit within the confines of copyright law. Law professor James Grimmelmann has picked up on this and written an absolutely brilliant piece over at Ars Technica, where he dives into the nitty gritty details of all of this to explain how copyright law for streaming went insane.”

To view this article in full, click here. 
This news also appeared in Wired.

Ars Technica, “Why Johnny Can’t Stream: How Video Copyright Went Insane”

By James Grimmelmann
August 30, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Video copyright

“Suppose I could offer you a choice of two technologies for watching TV online. Behind Door Number One sits a free-to-watch service that uses off-the-shelf technology and that buffers just enough of each show to put the live stream on the Internet. Behind Door Number Two lies a subscription service that requires custom-designed hardware and makes dozens of copies of each show. Which sounds easier to build—and to use? More importantly, which is more likely to be legal?”

To view this article in full, click here.

Info Docket, “Upcoming Conference in NYC: In Re Books (Law and the Future of Books”

By Gary Price
August 30, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Upcoming conference

“Law Professor, noted Google Book Search legal expert, and proprietor of The Laboratorium blog, James Grimmelmann, shared details with us about an upcoming conference taking place in New York City at the end of October. The “In Re Books” conference is scheduled to take place at the New York Law School on October 26th and 27th.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Raw Story, “Professors Endorse Legal Weed in Colorado as Obama Woos Students”

By Stephen C. Webster
August 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Legalizing marijuana

“More than 100 college professors across the nation signed an open letter on Tuesday endorsing a Colorado ballot measure that would legalize marijuana and regulate it like alcohol, in a move timed to coincide with President Barack Obama’s campaign stop at Colorado State University.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Crains Insider, “Today’s News”

August 28, 2012

NYLS’s Darren Bloch
Subject: New Appointment

“MOVING ON: Darren Bloch, formerly of the Empire State Development Corp. and City & State publisher, is New York Law School’s new vice president for public affairs.”

To view this article in full, click here.
(Available by subscription only)

New York Press, “District Commission Hear Public’s Opinions on Manhattan Divisions”

By Paul Bisceglio
August 27, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Public Hearing at NYLS

“Reunite Greenwich Village, and unite Chinatown and the Lower East Side. These were downtown Manhattanites’ two most common requests in the Districting Commission’s public hearing at New York Law School last week. “

To view this article in full, click here. 
This news also appeared in East Villager and Lower East Sider.

Crim Prof Blog, “Top –Ten Recent SSRN Downloads”

August 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin & Heather Cucolo
Subject: Top SSRN downloads

Top-Ten Recent SSRN Downloads in criminal law and procedure ejournals are here. The usual disclaimers apply.
Preventing Sex-Offender Recidivism Through Therapeutic Jurisprudence Approaches and Specialized Community Integration
Heather Cucolo, Michael L. Perlin,
New York Law School, New York Law School,

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Law Journal, “Power of Attorney in ‘Perosi v. LiGreci’: How Broad is Broad?”

By Lenore S. Davis
August 22, 2012

NYLS Adjunct Lenore Davis
Subject: Power of attorney

“Attorney Lenore S. Davis writes that, as reinforced in a recent appellate ruling, in counseling a client, the attorney must make it clear that the powers enumerated in his powers of attorney are in no way inclusive, and should work with the client to forestall any unintended use of said powers.”

To view this article in full, click here.

preLaw, “America’s 20 Most Innovative Law Schools”

Summer 2012

New York Law School
Subject: America’s 20 Most Innovative Law Schools

The article is viewable with a free subscription.

City & State First Read, “Morning Roundup”

August 24, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell
Subject: Happy Birthday

“HAPPY BIRTHDAY: … to Anthony Crowell, the new of dean and president of New York Law School and former counsel to Mayor Bloomberg…”

This article sent via email to subscribers.

The Villager, “Unified Village, Asian-Latino Districts Hot Topics at Hearings”

By Lincoln Anderson
August 23, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Public hearing at NYLS

“Advocates turned out to testify about the shape of City Council districts covering Greenwich Village, Chinatown and the Lower East Side at the New York City Districting Commission’s first public hearing last Thursday. The hearing was held at New York Law School, 185 West Broadway, in front of the 15 appointed members of the Districting Commission.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Futurist, “Serving Justice With Conversational Law”

By David R. Johnson
August 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty Richard Sherwin
Subject: Conversational Law

“Migration of law to electronic texts does change things. It increases access to the law for both lawyers and laymen. It allows searches across an ever larger corpus of information. It allows new forms of persuasion that combine text with diagrams, pictures, and videos, as my fellow New York Law School professor Richard K. Sherwin observes in Visualizing Law in the Age of the Digital Baroque (Routledge, 2011).”

To view this article, click here.
(Available by subscription only)

The Kansas City Star, “Missouri’s One-Drug Execution Plan Draws Some Critical Looks”

August 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty Robert Blecker
Subject: Death Penalty

“Their victim was 15 when she died. They snatched her from the street in front of her Kansas City house, raped her and ignored her pleas for mercy before plunging knives into her throat and chest. For those crimes committed 23 years ago, the state of Missouri says that they must die. ‘It’s wrong to equate humane with painless,’ said New York Law School professor Robert Blecker. ‘Some people deserve a quick but painful death.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “The Night Life Lawyer”

By Alan Feuer
August 18, 2012

NYLS Alum Salvatore Strazzullo ‘01
Subject: NYC Night Life Lawyer

“THE New York bar, like all complex professional societies, has every sort of specialty you can think of: white-shoe litigators, Mafia defenders, crusading Legal Aiders, corporate crisis managers, City Hall fixers, real estate closers and lowly filers of slip-and-fall lawsuits. Sal Strazzullo’s specialty is that capricious class of person occupying the world of New York night life. In a decade as a lawyer, Mr. Strazzullo, 40, has earned a reputation for taking care of the boldface celebrities — and lesser lights of the pleasure-seeking set — who get themselves in trouble after dark.”

To view this article in full, click here. 

New York Law Journal, “State Bar Recognizes Diversity Interns”

August 17, 2012

NYLS 3L’s Emily Freeborn and Mercedes Hobson
Subject: Diversity interns

“Law students in the Kenneth G. Standard Internship Program were recognized at an Aug. 14 reception at Alliance Bernstein.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The Daily Journal.

New York Law Journal, “NYLS Pens Brief in High Court’s Affirmative Action Case”

By Laura Haring
August 17, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer, Susan Abraham, 3L Students Lailah Pepe, Joycelyn Pittard and Xan Marshall & Alums Matthew Hellman and Christopher Binns
Subject: Affirmative action admission process

“A ‘systemic racial hierarchy’ has allowed racial disparities in educational opportunities to persist, New York Law School’s Racial Justice Project argues in an amicus brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, 11-345, supporting the university’s affirmative action admissions process. NYLS’ brief was written by Deborah Archer, the project’s director; professor Susan Abraham; and Aderson Francois, a professor at Howard University School of Law.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Capital, “Poll: Voters Don’t See the Harm in a Sick-Pay Mandate”

By Azi Paybarah
August 16, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Sick-Pay Mandate

“Most New York City voters support the idea of a bill requiring employers to provide sick pay and don’t believe it will harm business, according to a Quinnipiac poll. 5 pm. The New York City Districting Commission holds a public hearing at New York Law School, at 185 West Broadway in Manhattan.

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in East Villager and Lower East Side, and the Villager.

CNBC- India

August 14, 2012

NYLS Faculty Faith Stevelman
Subject: Interviewed on the trajectory of U.S. investor protection legislation from Sarbanes Oxley to Dodd Frank.

The New York Times, “Court to Hear Google’s Challenge to Class-Action Lawsuit on Book Scanning”

By Julie Bosman
August 14, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google’s Challenge to Class-Action Lawsuit

“In May, the Authors Guild celebrated a decision in the long-running case over Google’s book-scanning project when a federal judge granted its authors class-action status. Now Google has notched a small victory of its own. On Tuesday, an appeals court said the company could challenge the ruling of Judge Denny Chin that allowed the authors to sue as a group. James Grimmelmann, a professor at New York Law School who has closely followed the litigation over Google Book Search, said it was unlikely that the decision would delay the main case. ‘I’m thinking this is probably reflecting the high-profile nature of the litigation,’ Mr. Grimmelmann said. ’There’s an interest in getting this one right.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Giglaw.com, and Cambodian Times.

CrimProf Blog, “Top-Ten SSRN Downloads”

August 13, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin and Heather Cucolo
Subject: Most recent SSRN downloads.

“Top-Ten Recent SSRN Downloads in criminal law and procedure ejournals are here. The usual disclaimers apply. 328 Preventing Sex-Offender Recidivism Through Therapeutic Jurisprudence Approaches and Specialized Community Integration
Heather Cucolo, Michael L. Perlin,
New York Law School, New York Law School.””

To view this article in full, click here.

Legal Theory Blog, “Legal Theory Bookworm”

By Lawrence B. Solum
August 11, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: Ruti Teitel’s book, Humanity’s Law

“The Legal Theory Bookworm recommends Humanity’s Law by Ruti G. Teitel. Here is a description: In Humanity’s Law, renowned legal scholar Ruti Teitel offers a powerful account of one of the central transformations of the post-Cold War era: the profound normative shift in the international legal order from prioritizing state security to protecting human security.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Dow Jones Newswires, “DJ Compliance Watch: Facebook Fallout Not Yet Hitting Arbitration”

By Caitlin Nish
August 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty Howard Meyers
Subject: Facebook Fallout

“When a stock, bond or other security runs into trouble, what generally follows is a wave of customers filing arbitrations against their brokers. That may not be happening with Facebook Inc.’s (FB) initial public offering. Professor Howard Meyers, director of New York Law School’s Securities Arbitration Clinic, says it has received only five or six calls, from investors who weren’t able to sell their shares at the desired price.”

This article available by subscription only.

Reuters, “Ex-Goldman Program Charged, Again, Over Code Theft”

By Grant McCool
August 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty Eugene Cerruti
Subject: Former Goldman Sachs Group Inc programmer is charged again over code theft.

“Sergey Aleynikov, the former programmer, now faces charges brought by the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, a new twist in a case first filed by U.S. federal prosecutors in July 2009. [A]ccording to Eugene Cerruti, a professor at New York Law School who has been a federal prosecutor and public defender. ‘New York courts have interpreted its state statute to preclude a separate prosecution in New York following a prosecution in another jurisdiction,’ he said.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Sify and IT News Australia.

CrimProf Blog, “Cucolo and Perlin on Preventing Sex-Offender Recidivism”

August 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin and Adjunct Heather Cucolo
Subject: Preventing Sex Offender Recidivism

“Heather Cucolo and Michael L. Perlin (pictured) (New York Law School and New York Law School) has posted Preventing Sex-Offender Recidivism Through Therapeutic Jurisprudence Approaches and Specialized Community Integration on SSRN. It examines sex offender laws, past and present, looks at this area of sex offender commitment and containment through a therapeutic jurisprudence lens, and suggests basic policy changes that would optimally and constitutionally minimize re-offense rates, while upholding and protecting human rights of all citizens.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Gay City News, “Gay Polygamy?”

By Arthur Leonard
August 6, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur S. Leonard
Subject: Civil union validity in Massachusetts pertaining to divorce.

“The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court has ruled that a same-sex marriage contracted in that state was void under the Massachusetts law against polygamy, because one of the spouses had never formally dissolved a prior Vermont civil union. The court’s unanimous ruling means that a pending divorce action to end the marriage will be dismissed. According to the July 26 opinion by Chief Justice Roderick Ireland, Todd J. Warnken, entered into a civil union in Vermont in 2003. There is no proof that his civil union partner is deceased or that the civil union was legally dissolved.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Gay City News, “Fifth US Judge Strikes Down DOMA”

By Arthur S. Leonard
August 6, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur S. Leonard
Subject: District Judge Vanessa Bryant declares that the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional.

“Becoming the fifth US trial judge to declare the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional since the summer of 2010, District Judge Vanessa L. Bryant, in Hartford, ruled that Section 3 of the 1996 law, which denies federal recognition to valid same-sex marriages, violates the equal protection requirement of the Constitution’s Fifth Amendment. The July 31 decision in Pedersen v. Office of Personnel Management, which the Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders (GLAD) filed on behalf of six same-sex married couples and one widower, follows earlier rulings by courts in Boston, San Francisco, and New York. The plaintiffs’ marriages had taken place in Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire.”

To view this article in full, click here.

IntLawGrrls, “Look on! Granito & Law’s Relation to Film”

By Keina Yoshida
August 4, 2012

NYLS Faculty Richard K. Sherwin
Subject: Law and film relation

“What exactly is the relationship between law and film? In his book The Memory of Judgment: Making Law and History in the Trials of the Holocaust (2001), about which I posted a couple weeks ago, Amherst Professor Lawrence Douglas analyses the screening, during the during the Trial of Major War Criminals before the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg, of a ‘Nazi Concentration Camps’ documentary. Some scholars – such as New York Law School Professor Richard K. Sherwin in When Law Goes Pop: The Vanishing Line between Law and Popular Culture (2000) – have stated that we can’t understand the law without regard to these digital changes and their effects on criminal trials.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “With Key Filings in, Trials Loom in Google Book Cases”

By Andrew Albanese
August 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google’s hope for digitized library

“After a round of key filings, two Authors Guild cases challenging Google’s ambitious library book-scanning program are on schedule for early fall trial dates. Final reply briefs were filed July 27 for the Authors Guild v. HathiTrust, with that case now fully briefed and all but set for a November trial in Judge Harold Baer’s courtroom. ‘Google and HathiTrust have made a compelling case that digitization to support full-text search and long-term preservation is a fair use,’ New York Law School professor James Grimmelmann told PW. On the other hand, he notes, in the HathiTrust case at least, the Authors Guild has simply not made ‘a convincing case’ that there is harm to the copyright owners. (The Guild brief in the Google case is still under seal and awaiting redaction before its public release.)”

To view this article in full, click here.

Inside EPA Weekly, “Experts Brace for Environmental Law Attacks Due to Health Care Ruling”

By Suzanne Yohannan & Dawn Reeves
August 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty Lawrence P. Schnapf ‘84
Subject: Environmental laws

“Legal experts are expecting a host of new constitutional challenges to environmental laws in the wake of the Supreme Court’s recent decision holding that the individual mandate in President Obama’s healthcare law violates the Constitution’s Commerce Clause, though most experts doubt whether Commerce Clause suits will ultimately succeed. ‘Look for defendants who are alleged to be [Superfund] owners or operators to use the Supreme Court decision to argue that [Superfund] or [the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)] are either per se unconstitutional or cannot be used to seek cost recovery or require cleanup at such sites where the contamination is localized on the theory that such contamination has no impact on interstate commerce,’ Larry Schnapf, an adjunct professor at New York Law School who also leads several American Bar Association environmental committees, said in a recent blog post.”

By subscription only.

Tribeca Citizen, “Seen & Heard: Kool Bloo Has Closed”

August 2, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Various changes happening in our neighborhood.

“After not quite a year, Kool Bloo on Church has closed. A sign in the window says ‘Grand Re-Opening Under New Ownership Sunday August 12.’ Not all change is bad, things have moved a lot and it’s right that some change occurs, but lines will be redrawn. The Manhattan public meeting is on August 16, conveniently close to us at the New York Law School on W. Broadway.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Virtual Strategy Magazine, “Neota Logic CEO in the Fastcase 50”

August 2, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Michael Mills

“Neota Logic Inc. CEO Michael Mills was selected as one of the 2012 Fastcase 50, which honors ‘the fifty most interesting, provocative, and courageous leaders in the world of law, scholarship, and legal technology.’ Neota Logic collaborated with Georgetown Law School and New York Law School to introduce students to expert systems as an innovation in the delivery of legal services.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Law Fuel, “Law Firm News”

August 2, 2012

NYLS Adjunct Charles Weiss
Subject: New partner

“Holland & Knight today announced that Charles A. Weiss has joined the firm as a partner and head of its New York Intellectual Property Group. This hire is an important step in the firm’s commitment to grow and strengthen its New York office.”

ABA Journal, “The Theater’s 12 Greatest Courtroom Dramas”

By Jill Schachner Chanen
August 1, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michelle Zierler
Subject: Law as theater

“Lawyers love the stage. They may not care for the theater, but they love what it represents: the issues, the words, the conflict, the rhetoric, the liturgy, the drama.“
To view this article in full, click here.

Ars Technica, “Craigslist Tightens Grip, Demanding Exclusive Ownership of Ads”

By Timothy B. Lee
August 1, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Craigslist wants ownership

“Craigslist is now demanding to be the ‘exclusive licensee’ of content posted to its site, an apparent bid to strengthen its legal position against third parties that re-use the content. Last week, the classified site sued Padmapper and 3Taps, two sites that provide alternative interfaces for Craigslist data. But two legal experts Ars Technica talked to suggest that Craigslist has a weak case. ‘I’m sympathetic to Craigslist, but they don’t have that much going for them,’ New York Law School professor James Grimmelmann told Ars.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Digital Journal.

The National Law Journal, “Judge Who Graduated from Accused Law School Declines to Recuse”

By Karen Sloan
August 1, 2012

NYLS Lawsuit Dismissal
Subject: Judge David Schmidt doesn’t want to recuse himself from case against his alma mater.

“Can a trial judge be impartial when his alma mater is being sued for fraud? Three attorneys behind a spate of fraud class actions targeting law schools don’t think so. The defense motion heavily cites a March opinion by New York County, N.Y., Supreme Court Judge Melvin Schweitzer dismissing a nearly identical case against New York Law School. Schweitzer ruled that the employment data at issue in that case were not deceptive and that the plaintiffs provided no facts to support their allegations of fraud.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in ABA JournalJD JournalThe CourtNew York Law JournalLaw FuelBusiness Insider, and Inside Counsel.

Virtual Law Practice, “Review of SubTech 2012 at New York Law School in Tweets”

July 28, 2012

NYLS’s Twelfth International Conference on Substantive Technology in Legal Education and Practice
Subject: Various opinions on Subtech Conference.

“Yesterday was a productive day of brainstorming at New York Law School which is hosting the 2012 Twelfth International Conference on Substantive Technology in Legal Education and Practice (SubTech). Topics discussed at the roundtable included Automation of Legal Work, The Nature of the Current and Future Legal Profession, Technology and the Law School Predicament and Re-Invention. You can see a list of the attendees on the site. The discussion was heated at times because of the mix of technologists, academics and practitioners.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Jewish Press, “Writer Profile: Elke Weiss”

By Karen Greenberg
July 27, 2012

NYLS Student Elke Weiss

Subject: Interview between author and Elke Weiss
“Karen Greenberg: Where did you grow up and where do you live now? Elke Weiss: I grew up in Manhattan Beach, in Brooklyn. I now live in downtown Manhattan by the Hudson River. I really like living by the water.”

To view this interview in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Police Chief Heading Theater Shooting Probe is NYLS Graduate”

By Laura Haring
July 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty Kirk Burkhalter & Alum Daniel Oates ‘86
Subject: NYLS Alum Daniel Oates leads Colorado shooting investigation

“New York Law School professor Kirk Burkhalter was relieved when he learned that Daniel Oates, the NYPD veteran who is the police chief in Aurora, Colo., was leading the investigation of a shooting during a midnight showing of The Dark Knight Rises in which 12 people were killed and 58 wounded.”

To view this article in full, click here.

American Library Association, “Putting Google and Other Social Media Sites to Work for your Library”

By Jill Davis
July 27, 2012

NYLS’s Terry Ballard
Subject: Book on using social media to create success in libraries.

“Many libraries and museums have already adapted to the current information climate and work with Google, Facebook, Twitter and iTunes to deliver information to their users—but not all. Terry Ballard, an award-winning author with more than 20 years’ experience as an academic systems librarian, has conducted more than two dozen interviews with professionals who have created exemplary work using social media and shows how their experiences can create success for your institution’s library.”

The New York Times, “To Help Close the Achievement Gap, Address Stop-and-Frisk”

By Udi Ofer
July 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty Udi Ofer
Subject: Stop-and-Frisk bias

“Eighteen-year-old Angel Ortiz feels lucky when a stop-and-frisk encounter doesn’t also lead to a wrongful arrest. In February last year, when Angel was in the 10th grade, he was decidedly unlucky. After he left a friend’s home in Far Rockaway, Queens, two police officers stopped, handcuffed and arrested him for trespassing in the friend’s building, even though Angel had done nothing wrong.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Atlantic, “Inside the Quest to Put the World’s Libraries Online”

By Esther Yi
July 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Making libraries digital

“In March 2011, Judge Denny Chin rejected the amended settlement, arguing that it would give the company “a significant advantage over competitors, rewarding it for engaging in wholesale copying of copyrighted works without permission.” The lawsuit continues to this day. But most pundits are pessimistic about the future of Google’s legal travails: ‘The settlement we all grew to know and love, all that high drama, is over. It’s not coming back in anything like its old form,’ says James Grimmelmann, an associate professor at New York Law School, who has been following the case closely.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Antiwar.com, “Congress Must Act on Warrantless Wiretapping”

By Trevor Timm
July 26, 2012

NYLS Alum Trevor Timm ‘11
Subject: Wiretapping without a warrant

“As Congress and the president rush to re-authorize the dangerous FISA Amendments Act — the law shamefully passed after pressure to legalize certain portions of the NSA’s warrantless wiretapping program — EFF has been sounding the alarm that Americans’ communications are still being unconstitutionally collected by the government without a warrant.”

To view this article in full, click here.

ZDNet, “Microsoft Profits From Linux Patent FUD”

By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols
July 25, 2012

NYLS Faculty Mark Webbink
Subject: Microsoft and Linux

“Microsoft has long made some nice cash from convincing Android vendors that they should pay them for Linux-related patents. Mark Webbink, a visiting professor of law at Duke University, executive director of the Center for Patent Innovations at New York Law School and former Red Hat agreed. ‘I don’t think this is the first MS patent licensing deal covering Linux on servers, and like the others it is a licensing deal with a user, not a Linux ‘developer/distributor. (d/d)’”

To view this article in full, click here.

El Financiero, “Europa adoptara leyes similares a la Dodd Frank”

By Marcela Ojeda Castilla
July 25, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ronald Filler
Subject: Dodd Frank

By subscription.

IFLR, “How Banks Could Have Libor Cases Dismissed”

By Ryan Bolger
July 24, 2012

NYLS Faculty Houman Shadab
Subject: Banks find angle that could possibly dismiss the cases against them

“Class action law suits filed in US courts claim international banks colluded at the expense of investors, community banks, municipalities and investment funds. Bunt banks are not without ammunition of their own. Houman Shadab, a financial law professor at New York Law School, said that banks might be able to protect themselves by arguing the Libor rates were falsely reported in response to regulators giving them the implied authority to manipulate rates in response to macroeconomic stress.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Escapist Magazine, “Game Con Speaker Called to Lead Interactive Entertainment Group”

By Andy Chalk
July 24, 2012

NYLS Adjunct Greg Boyd
Subject: Adjunct Greg Boyd gets new position

“Attorney S. Gregory Boyd has joined Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz as head of the firm’s Interactive Entertainment Group. New York-based Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz, a full-service law firm’ that specializes in the media, entertainment and advertising industries, has announced the addition of a new partner, S. Gregory Boyd, who has joined the company as head of its Interactive Entertainment Group.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Gamasutra.

Cape Cod Times, “Author Events”

July 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Upcoming events from specific authors

“James F. Simon, Martin Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus at New York Law School, will discuss his new book, ‘FDR and Chief Justice Hughes: The President, the Supreme Court, and the Epic Battle Over the New Deal,’ 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at Truro Public Library, 7 Standish Way, North Truro.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Wicked Local.

Inside Higher Ed, “Flipping the Script”

By Steve Kolowich
July 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelman
Subject: Library associations vs. Authors Guild

“In 2009, when the Authors Guild tried to settle its epic legal battle with Google over the company’s massive Google Book Search project, the Association of Research Libraries and the Association of College and Research Libraries both fought the settlement. James Grimmelmann, an associate professor at New York Law School, says the libraries’ double-standard argument may prove to be a more effective weapon against the guild’s claims about the security of the copyrighted works — HathiTrust’s security arrangement is more or less equivalent to what the Authors Guild had agreed to in the proposed Google settlement — than against the guild’s arguments about compensation and licensing fees.”

To view this article in full, click here.

ABA Journal, “Around the Blawgosphere: Proposal to Save Law Students Money on Books; Adjunct Blasts Rankings”

By Sarah Randag
July 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty Mitchell Rubinstein
Subject: John Mayer’s proposal to make books for law school free

“At the CALI Spotlight Blog, Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction executive director John Mayer, laid out a ‘$150 million casebook challenge.’ At Adjunct Law Prof Blog, Mitchell Rubinstein, senior counsel at New York State United Teachers and an adjunct law professor at New York Law School, suggests that It would be better to base this ranking on which law faculties were most cited by courts.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Wintery Knight, “Should Abortion Be Legal? Scott Klusendorf vs. Nadine Strossen”

July 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty: Nadine Strossen
Subject: Abortion

“Abortion can be a complicated issue, but the nice thing about Scott is that he cuts right to the core of the debate and makes sure to clarify what each side is saying. He strips away the rhetoric and gets down to the real arguments on each side and the pro-life side comes out on top.”

To view the video, click here.

The Technology Liberation Front, “FCC’s Rosenworcel Calls for Incentive Auction Approach to Reclaim Federal Spectrum”

By Fred Campbell
July 20, 2012

NYLS Advanced Communications Law and Policy Institute
Subject: Spectrum

“Yesterday, FCC Commissioner Rosenworcel joined fellow Commissioner Pai in calling for a clear timeline for upcoming incentive auctions. Setting a timeline for critical decisions that will affect the future of the mobile Internet for the next decade is common sense. As I noted at a recent event hosted by the Advanced Communications Law and Policy Institute at New York Law School, the federal government’s greatest challenge in increasing the efficiency of its spectrum use is funding, which is exactly what incentive auctions are designed to produce.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “Cooley Law Grads’ Lawsuit Dismissed”

By Chelsea Phipps
July 20, 2012

NYLS Lawsuit Dismissal
Subject: Michigan court dismisses former Cooley Law students’ case

“A Michigan court dismissed a lawsuit on Friday brought by former students of Cooley Law School who accused their alma mater of misrepresenting recent graduate job placement statistics. Cooley’s case is among the first of more than a dozen similar lawsuits against schools nationwide. A case against New York Law School has already been dismissed in state court.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Tax Prof BlogThe National JuristABA JournalCL& P BlogThe National Law Journal, Above the LawInside CounselAdjunct Law Prof BlogCrain’s Detroit BusinessLibrary JournalThe CareeristNew York Law JournalDaily Record, and Law and More.

New York Daily News, “Aurora Police Chief Daniel Oates Began Crime-Fighting Career with NYPD”

By Joe Kemp & Patrice O’Shaughnessy
July 20, 2012

NYLS Alum Daniel Oates ‘86
Subject: Police Chief Daniel Oates responds quickly and effectively to Colorado shooting

“The cop in charge of responding to the horrific Colorado massacre earned his stars fighting crime with the NYPD. Aurora Police Chief Daniel Oates began his career as a beat cop in the 19th Precinct on the upper East Side. The New York Law School grad — who also holds a master of science degree from New York University — finished his 21-year career with the NYPD in 2001 as the commanding officer of the department’s Intelligence Division.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in New York Post, Gothamist, NY1 NBC New YorkDenver PostVos Iz Neias?, and Fox News.

Voice of America

July 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty Robert Blecker
Subject: Death penalty

Robert Blecker appeared on Voice of America (Persia) in a two part report on the death penalty. The first part aired on July 1.

Youth Today, “Eight Ways to Improve the Juvenile Justice Programs.”

By Carl Debeer & John Lash
July 19, 2012

NYLS Law Review’s article
Subject: Bettering the Juvenile Justice System

“Let’s imagine that things could be different though. But what could we do that is different? One place to start is with a recent article in the New York Law School Law Review. It is written by Gabrielle Prisco, the director of the Juvenile Justice Project, a program of The Correctional Association of New York, or CA for short. The CA, a non–profit, has advocated for better practices in the justice system since 1844, and actually has legislative authority to conduct inspections and investigations of prisons. Prisco is in a good position to offer objective and informed recommendations that are unfettered by bureaucracy.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Correctional Association of New York.

Gay City News, “ACLU Seeks Supreme Court Review in Windsor DOMA Suit.”

By Arthur Leonard
July 18, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Windsor fights to claim her same-sex spouse’s estate taxes

“Following hard on the petitions filed by the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group of the House of Representatives (BLAG) and the US solicitor general to get the Supreme Court to take up the constitutionality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), the LGBT Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union has filed a petition asking the Court to hear Edith (Edie) Windsor’s case as well.”

To view this article in full, click here.

NASDAQ, “How Law School education Propels Real Estate Career.”

July 18, 2012

NYLS Alum Ken Biberaj
Subject: Law school increases success in real estate career

“In Chapter 13 of 21 in his 2012 Capture Your Flag interview, New York City Council candidate and public relations executive Ken Biberaj, after arriving in New York City in 2005, takes night school courses at New York Law School to learn the law associated with real estate.”

To view the video interview, click here.
This news also appeared on AOL.

Bloomberg BNA, “Privilege Shields Law Firm’s Internal Probe if Its Counsel Didn’t Deal With Outside Client.”

By Kirk Swanson
July 18, 2012

NYLS Faculty Elizabeth Chambliss
Subject: Privilege for internal law firm communications

“Privilege and work product protection attach to lawyers’ communications with their firm’s in-house counsel about a dissatisfied client when the conflict of the lawyers still representing the client cannot fairly be imputed to the attorney serving as in-house counsel, the Georgia Court of Appeals declared July 13. The court of appeals surveyed many of the decisions from other jurisdictions on the topic of privilege for internal law firm communications, but in the end it adopted the framework advocated by New York Law School professor Elizabeth Chambliss in her article The Scope of In-Firm Privilege, 80 Notre Dame L. Rev. 1721 (2005).

To view this article in full, click here.

National Jurist, “Most Innovative Law Schools Announced.”

July 17, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Voted one of most innovative law schools

“Law schools are pushing the boundaries of the traditional law school model and experimenting at a level that legal education has not seen for several years, a new story reveals.”

To view this article in full, click here.

ABA Journal, “Study Names Top Law Schools for Scholarly Impact; 18 Significantly Outperform US News Ranking.”

By Debra Cassens Weiss
July 17, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Scholarly impact based on law journal citations

“Yale and Harvard continue to dominate rankings of law schools based on law journal citations for their tenured faculty, but a newer law school has managed to secure the seventh spot. Other law schools with a scholarly impact well above their ranking in U.S. News & World Report are Brooklyn, Cardozo, Case Western, Colorado, Florida State, George Mason, Hawaii, Hofstra, Houston, Missouri-Columbia, New York Law School, Penn State, Pittsburgh, Rutgers-Camden and Seattle.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The Wall Street Journal.

The New Media Journal, “Environmental ‘Citizen Lawsuits’ Equivalent to Ambulance Chasing.”

By Michael P. Tremoglie
July 17, 2012

NYLS Faculty David Schoenbrod
Subject: Environmental ‘Citizen Lawsuits’

“A little known provision contained in federal environmental laws known as the ‘citizen lawsuit’ is funding political special interest groups, critics say. Professor David Schoenbrod, a trustee professor of law at New York Law School and a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, explained how the system works.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Social Fish, “Are You Trying Social Media Contests to Promote your Conference?”

By Camille Macker and Lindsay Curcio
July 17, 2012

NYLS Faculty Lindsay Curcio
Subject: Social Media Contests

“Each year, AILA hosts many conferences and seminars to provide its members with important information about developments in immigration law. The most important and anticipated event is the Annual Conference held in June of each year. AILA has approximately 11,000 members in the U.S. and internationally. Members include attorneys and professors. A law student membership program exists too. Conferences are always well-attended and include a multitude of panels on all topics in immigration law and practice development, pro bono initiatives, networking opportunities and social events. The conference is held in a different U.S. or Canadian city each year.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Washington Post, “John G. Roberts and the Leadership of America’s Great Chief Justices.”

By James F. Simon
July 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty James F. Simon
Subject: The leadership of America’s great chief justices

“Reactions to Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr.’s opinion for the Supreme Court, which upheld major provisions of the Affordable Care Act, divided along a predictable political fault line. Liberals applauded it; conservatives denounced it. Beyond the immediate result, however, Roberts’s opinion raises an intriguing, and potentially historic, question: In abandoning the hard-driving conservative wing of the court, has Roberts finally become the chief justice of the United States in both title and spirit?”

To view this article in full, click here.

Michelangelo Signorile Program, Sirius Radio, “Supreme Court Case Windsor v. US.”

July 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Interview about Windsor v. US

To hear the interview, click here.

Hot Air Green Room, “Death Row Inmate Goes Out on Full Stomach, Ingests 29,000-Calorie Last Meal.”

By Howard Portnoy
July 15, 2012

NYLS Faculty Robert Blecker
Subject: Death Row inmates’ final meals

“Except in Texas, which did away with the policy in 2011, condemned men in prisons throughout the U.S. continue to eat a hearty meal before their date with the executioner—some heartier than others. The spiteful taunt prompted death penalty advocate and New York Law School professor Robert Blecker to renew efforts to raise public awareness of the ‘undeservedly pleasant’ life that has become the norm for prisoners inside America’s maximum-security prisons.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Hour, “Husband of Coma Victim Wins Justice Award.”

By Steve Kobak
July 13, 2012

The Hour, “Husband of Coma Victim Wins Justice Award.”
By Steve Kobak
July 13, 2012

NYLS’s Center for Justice and Democracy
Subject: Malpractice suit against Norwalk Hospital

“A Norwalk native whose wife spent more than a decade in a coma due to a botched medical procedure was recognized recently by the Center for Justice and Democracy at the New York Law School for his work advocating for patients rights.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Reverse Mortgage Daily, “Who’s Speaking to Congress on Reverse Mortgage Matters, Anyway?”

By Elizabeth Ecker
July 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Houman Shadab
Subject: Experts speak in hearing

“As members of Congress work to communicate with different industries, including the reverse mortgage business, representatives from those industries—and outsiders—are often called to testify. Dr. Anthony Sanders, Distinguished Professor of Real Estate Finance, Senior Scholar, Mercatus Center at George Mason University and Mr. Houman Shadab, Associate Professor of Law, New York Law School were called upon for their expertise in housing related matters.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Legal Newsline, “Environmental ‘Citizen Lawsuits’ are Equivalent to Ambulance Chasing, Critic Says.”

By Michael P. Tremoglie
July 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty David Schoenbrod
Subject: Citizen Lawsuits

“A little known provision contained in federal environmental laws known as the ‘citizen lawsuit’ is funding political special interest groups, critics say. Professor David Schoenbrod, a trustee professor of law at New York Law School and a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, explained how the system works. ‘Normally law enforcement is done by the government but most environmental statutes contain provisions that allow any citizen affected by a violation to bring an enforcement action against the violator,’ Schoenbrod said.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Guardian, “The NSA’s Warrantless Wiretapping is a Crime, Not a State Secret.”

By Cindy Coh and Trevor Timm
July 10, 2012

NYLS Alum Trevor Timm ‘11
Subject: Wiretapping

“This week, cellphone carriers publicly reported that US law enforcement made an astounding 1.3m demands for customer text messages, caller locations, and other information last year. The disclosure has sparked a flood of press coverage and consumer outrage, given much of the information was obtained without a warrant.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Right Side News.

Bloomberg, “Merkin’s Madoff Fund To Pay Investors $500 Million.”

By Linda Sandler and Chris Dolmetsch
July 9, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Madoff Victims

“Ezra Merkin’s bankrupt Ariel and Gabriel funds, so-called feeder funds for Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme, will pay investors $110 million, bringing total recoveries to more than $500 million. Investors including prominent charities entrusted their funds to Merkin. Institutions that have alleged they lost money in Merkin’s investments with Madoff include New York University, Yeshiva University and New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The European Journal of International Law, “Book Reviews: Ruti Teitel’s Humanity’s Law.”

By Gerd Hankel
July 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: Book Review

“In Ruti Teitel’s view there is absolutely no doubt that we live in a world in which legal relationships are undergoing ever more significant change, a fact of which she informs the reader right at the beginning of her book.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Government Technology, “’Networked Democracy’ Researched By Former U.S. Deputy CTO.”

July 9, 2012

Beth Noveck & NYLS’s Institute for Information Law & Policy
Subject: Grant

“The Institute for Information Law and Policy at New York Law School was awarded an $800,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. The funds will be used to support a research group that will study the impact of computer networks on democratic institutions, both in the United States and abroad, Dean Anthony W. Crowell announced.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Inside Indiana Business, “Forum to Focus on ‘Outdated’ Telecom Laws.”

By Andy Ober
July 9, 2012

NYLS’s Advanced Communications Law and Policy Institute
Subject: National forum to discuss aligning competition policy with market dynamics

“Can Broadband Power an Economic Recovery?” is July 10 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., and is hosted by the Advanced Communications Law and Policy Institute of the New York Law School. “

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Politico.

Gay City News, “Appellate Panel Upholds New York’s Marriage Equality Law.”

By Arthur Leonard
July 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Marriage Equality Law

“A unanimous panel of the New York Appellate Division has rejected a challenge to the state’s Marriage Equality Law (MEA) enacted on June 24, 2011.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “HathiTrust, Authors Guild File Motions in Digitization Battle.”

By Andrew Albanese
July 6, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Authors Guild vs. HathiTrust

“The battle lines are drawn, or should we say, more battle lines are now drawn. On June 29, the parties in the Authors Guild vs. HathiTrust filed motions for summary judgment, with the Authors Guild asserting that it should win because the library defendants have no viable defense for their mass-digitization program, while the HathiTrust argues that it should win because its program clearly falls under fair use. The Section 108 argument is essentially “a revamped version” of the AG’s February motion for judgment on the pleadings, blogged New York Law School’s James Grimmelmann, adding that the court has yet to rule on that motion.”

To view this article in full, click here.

ZD Net, “ACTA: It’s Time to Rethink.”

By Suzanne Tindal
July 5, 2012

NYLS Faculty Dan Hunter
Subject: The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement

“The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s ‘ACTA is fine’ facade has just taken a fatal hit. It’s time for the department to reconsider its position on the endangered agreement. However, New York Law School professor Dan Hunter said that in adopting ACTA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, Australia would limit the amount of reform that might eventuate from its current copyright review.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Elder and Special Needs Law Journal Volume 22, No. 2, “Freely and Independently, Diluting the Right of an A.I.P. to Retain Counsel in an Article 81 Proceeding.”

By Peter J. Strauss
Spring 2012

NYSL Faculty: Peter J. Strauss
Subject: Article 81 Proceeding

Available by subscription only.

CNN, “Chief Justice Roberts: The Decider.”

By James Simon
June 29, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Chief Justice Roberts

“With his opinion for a narrow majority of the Supreme Court, upholding major provisions of the Affordable Care Act, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. has, for the first time since his confirmation as chief justice in 2005, breached the gap between the conservative and liberal wings of the court on a polarizing political issue.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Bloomberg, “Roberts Rejects Partisanship in Backing Obama Health Law.”

By Greg Stohr
June 29, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Chief Justice Roberts

“With a single vote supporting President Barack Obama’s health-care law, Republican-appointed Chief Justice John Roberts asserted his independence and defused claims that partisanship rules the Supreme Court. ‘It would appear that he has put the prestige of the court and the institutional image of the court as nonpartisan above his ideological values,’ said James F. Simon, the former dean of New York Law School and the author of six books about the Supreme Court, referring to the health-care law.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Health Works CollectiveBloombergThe Doctor Weighs InCNN, and Newsday.

The Guardian, “How Does a School Recover From Trauma?”

By Carolyn Lunsford Mears
June 29, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Recovering from 9/11

“On 20th April 1999 I heard that there had been a shooting at my son’s school. My response was that it was probably nothing… that sort of thing just didn’t happen at Columbine High School. After disaster, educators must face their own trauma response while they continue to teach. Therapists offer psychological counseling, but there’s little guidance for teaching in the aftermath. As a result, I have continued work in this area, recently publishing an anthology of stories and lessons learned from survivors elsewhere, including the dean of New York Law School (near the World Trade Center); educators from schools destroyed by Hurricane Katrina; counsellors in Jokela, Finland, scene of another school shooting; Columbine teachers and students; a safety consultant who was abused as a child, and others.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Technology Academics Policy, “James Grimmelmann and Peter Swire Testify on Do Not Track.”

June 29, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Testimony

“Recognizing that consumer information is the currency of the web, both sides of Congress have recently held hearings to work toward an understanding of how to balance the needs of businesses for user data and the needs of consumers to have some control over their personal online information. TAP scholars James Grimmelmann, New York Law School, and Professor Peter Swire, Ohio State University’s Moritz College of Law, were witnesses.”

To view this article in full, click here.

JWeekly, “Madoff Associate Merkin Agrees to Pay $400 Million.”

June 28, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Madoff Victims

“Former money manager J. Ezra Merkin has agreed to turn over hundreds of millions of dollars to duped investors in Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme. Among the victims, according to the Associated Press, were the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty, New York Law School, Bard College, Harlem Children’s Zone and Homes for the Homeless.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Arizona Daily Star, “Agency Targets Immigration Backlog.”

June 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty Lenni Benson
Subject: Immigration Backlog

“Government officials have adopted a series of recommendations to streamline federal immigration courts, where a record-high number of backlogged cases has brought the ‘fairness and effectiveness’ of the courts into question. ’Judges sometimes feel like a school master without the ability to suspend or grade a student,’ said Lenni Benson, a New York Law School professor and one of two outside consultants who worked on the report.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in the Yuma Sun.

1010 Wins, SCOTUS Ruling on Healthcare

June 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty: Nadine Strossen
Subject: Healthcare

Point of Law, “Winning the Battle, But Losing the War (For Expansive Federal Government Power)?”

By Nadine Strossen
June 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Affordable Care Act

“The Court’s decision is hard to summarize in a simple headline because of its multiple holdings, which were supported by majority votes comprised of differing subsets of the Justices. To be sure, the bottom-line result of the Court’s central holding was to sustain Congressional power to enact the Affordable Care Act’s minimum coverage requirement.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “Obama, Roberts Legacies Linked.”

By Carol E. Lee and Jess Bravin
June 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: The Obama, Roberts Relationship

President Barack Obama and Chief Justice John Roberts both came of age in the aftermath of liberalism’s political heyday. Both earned Harvard law degrees and rose to prominence as relatively young men.

To view this article in full, click here.
By subscription only.

The New York Post, “Murderers Laugh in State ‘Play’ Pen.”

By Andrea Peyser
June 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty Robert Blecker
Subject: Inmate Conditions

“It wasn’t the comfy bed, yummy meals or color TV that made Professor Robert Blecker go positively postal. It was the Hershey bar.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Tucson Sentinel, “Feds Try to Streamline Immigration Case Backlog.”

By Meghan McCarthy
June 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty Lenni Benson
Subject: Immigration Cases

“Government officials have adopted a series of recommendations to streamline federal immigration courts, where a record-high number of backlogged cases has brought the ‘fairness and effectiveness’ of the courts into question. ‘Judges sometimes feel like a school master without the ability to suspend or grade a student,’ said Lenni Benson, a New York Law School professor and one of two outside consultants who worked on the report.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Cronkite News.

Fiscal Times, “Why the Health Care Mandate ‘Tax’ is a Paper Tiger.”

By Maureen Mackey
June 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Obamacare

The financial consequences to small businesses, investors and consumers are now top of mind following today’s Supreme Court ruling that left intact almost all of the Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare. Nadine Strossen, a Constitutional Law scholar and a professor at New York Law School, notes that ‘essentially it would cost much more to buy health insurance than to pay the penalty, and the law itself specifically provides that the maximum penalty be based on income and other factors.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

ZD Net, “Delay Ratifying ACTA Until 2013: Committee.”

By Josh Taylor
June 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty Dan Hunter
Subject: Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement

“ACTA introduces a legal framework for 37 countries on copyright protection as a measure to curb both the flow of counterfeit goods around the globe and digital copyright infringement for music and films. Earlier this month, New York Law School professor Dan Hunter said that in adopting ACTA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, Australia would limit the amount of reform that might eventuate from the copyright review.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Newsday, “McMahon: Here Come New School-Funding Suits.”

By E.J. McMahon
June 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty David Schoenbrod
Subject: School Funding Suits

“Seventeen years ago, the state Court of Appeals ruled that New York State has a constitutional obligation to ensure that public schools provide all students with a ‘sound basic education.’ Nonetheless, as David Schoenbrod of New York Law School observed while the original CFE case was pending, ‘the court’s opinion does make a difference — not because the court can enforce it, but because most people seem to think the court can enforce it.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

PBS, “The Legacy of the Vincent Chin Case, 30 Years Later.”

June 26, 2012

New York Law School event “Revisiting Vincent”
Subject: NYLS event

“On Tuesday, May 22, 2012, the Asian American Arts Alliance, Asian American Bar Association of New York (AABANY) and the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA) co-presented Revisiting Vincent, a performance adaptation of the Vincent Chin case composed of original trial transcripts, video interviews, and personal testimonies.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The National Law Journal, “Quinn Emanuel Eyeing Hong Kong and Singapore.”

By Anthony Lin
June 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty Tai-Heng Cheng
Subject: New Position

“Last November, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan managing partner John Quinn stated in no uncertain terms that his high-powered firm, a litigation-only shop that ranks No. 2 in the Am Law 100 in terms of profits per partner, had ruled out a Hong Kong office. Earlier this month, Quinn Emanuel also brought on board as a New York partner Singapore-born Tai-Heng Cheng, a New York Law School professor and international arbitration specialist.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The New York Law Journal, and The AM Law Daily.

Daily Kos, “The Progressive Who Stopped the New Deal.”

By MrLiberal
June 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Book Inspiration

“At this critical juncture in American history, the Chief Justice of the United States seemingly leads a group of 4 colleagues in halting vital efforts to make our country more prosperous, healthier and democratic. The inspiration for this 2-part story comes from a new book by James F. Simon entitled FDR and Chief Justice Hughes – The President, the Supreme Court, and the Epic Battle Over the New Deal.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Washington Post Blog, “Are We Headed Toward Another Court-Packing Crisis?”

By Ezra Klein
June 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Interview

“James Simon is a professor and dean emeritus at New York Law School. His new book, ‘FDR and Chief Justice Hughes,’ tracks the battle between Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the chief justice of a Supreme Court that seemed, at the outset of the New Deal, to be determined to reject most anything significant FDR did.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Union Leader, “Another View—Chuck Douglas” ‘Early Offer’ Malpractice Bill Would Trample on Patients’ Rights.”

By Chuck Douglas
June 26, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Senate Bill 406

“Last week Gov. John Lynch vetoed the so-called ‘early offer’ bill (Senate Bill 406), calling it unfair and unbalanced. The governor says he is vetoing the bill ‘in order to adequately protect the interests of injured patients.’ I agree with him. So do the two largest medical malpractice providers in the state, both of whom oppose the bill, both of whom already have a system for quick resolution with no complaints and thus no need for government intervention. So do victim advocates from all over the state. So do law professors from the University of New Hampshire School of Law and New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Tech Radar, “Facebook Releases Then Pulls ‘Find Friends Nearby.’”

By Michael Rougeau
June 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: ‘Find Friends Nearby’ on Facebook

“Facebook recently rolled out a feature called ‘Find Friends Nearby,’ which allowed users on mobile devices to find other users in their immediate vicinity, before immediately un-rolling it. ‘There’s a great term that I heard recently from James Grimmelmann, who’s a professor at New York Law School, called ‘privacy lurches’,’ Frank Pasquale, professor of law at Seton Hall Law School, told TechRadar.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “As Bloomberg’s Third Term Winds Down, Unusually Loyal Aides Begin to Eye Exits.”

By Michael M. Grynbaum
June 25, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell and Carole Post
Subject: New Positions

“As New York City mayors go, Michael R. Bloomberg has enjoyed an unusual degree of fidelity among the ranks. His inner circle, mostly unchanged after a decade in office, has avoided the churning disputes and abrupt exits that typically plague political administrations. In February, Anthony Crowell, the mayor’s counselor, decamped to New York Law School, and he will be joined there by Carole Post, the city’s chief technology officer, who left in April.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Crooked Timber, “Open Data Seminar.”

By Henry
June 25, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck
Subject: Crooked Timber Seminar

“Another Crooked Timber seminar, albeit on an issue rather than an author. Contributors are: Beth Noveck (professor at New York Law School, author of Wiki Politics, and former Deputy Chief Technology Officer at the White House)”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Exiled, “Former ACLU President Nadine Strossen Hired by Koch Cartel to Play ‘Speaker’ on Reason Magazine Cruise.”

June 25, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Reason Magazine Cruise

“Nadine Strossen has written, lectured, and practiced extensively in the areas of constitutional law, civil liberties, and international human rights. From 1991 through 2008 she served as president of the American Civil Liberties Union, the first woman to head the nation’s largest and oldest civil liberties organization.”

To view this article in full, click here.

ISOC-NY, “VIDEO: James Grimmelmann Testimony on Public Policy Implications of New Technology.”

June 25, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Testimony Footage

“On June 19 2012 James Grimmelmann, Professor of Law, New York Law School, gave testimony before the U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary – Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, Competition, and the Internet – at a hearing on New Technologies and Innovations in the Mobile and Online Space and the Implications for Public Policy.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared on YouTube.

The Wall Street Journal, “Hedge Fund Manager to pay $405M to Madoff Victims.”

June 24, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Madoff Victims

“A settlement announced Sunday will bring $405 million to victims of Bernard Madoff’s historic investment scam, the state attorney general said. The victims include New York Law School, Bard College, Harlem Children’s Zone, Homes for the Homeless and the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared hereThe New York Daily NewsThe New York TimesNew York PostFailed MessiahJewish Telegraphic Agency, and The Epoch Times.

Lohud, “History: James F. Simon of West Nyack.”

By Peter D Kramer
June 23, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Top Books

“West Nyack’s James F. Simon, the former New York Law School dean who hasn’t left the classroom, has written three books about U.S. presidents and their Supreme Court chief justices: His latest is “FDR and Chief Justice Hughes: The President, the Supreme Court, and the Epic Battle over the New Deal.”

The New York Law Journal, “Data Counts Law School Graduates in Full-Time, Long-Term Legal Jobs.”

By Karen Sloan and Laura Haring
June 22, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Employment Data

“Of the 4,702 students who graduated from New York state’s 15 law schools in 2011, only 57.2 percent had found within nine months full-time, long-term jobs requiring bar admission, according to figures released on June 18 by the American Bar Association. The state figure is slightly better than the national average of 54.9 percent.”

To view this article in full, click here.

WSDK 1550 AM Radio, “The ACLU, Civil Liberties and Religion: What are the Issues?”

June 21, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: ACLU

To listen to the coverage, click here.

ABC News, “Convicted Killers Often Live a Life of Pleasure, Professor Says.”

By Chris Cuomo
June 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty: Robert Blecker
Subject: Death Penalty

“Most people imagine prison life for convicted murderers as being harsh, brutal, and isolated, a real-life ‘Shawshank Redemption.’ ‘They’re playing on softball fields with lined base paths and umpires in uniforms, while other guys are hanging out, getting a suntan,’ Blecker said. ‘Those who committed the worst crimes, who deserve to suffer the most, generally suffer the least.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Daily Mail, and Radar Online.

JD Supra, “Can Your School Suspend You For a Facebook Post?”

By Aaron Kase
June 19, 2012

Adjunct Mitchell Rubinstein
Subject: Facebook & School Suspension

“A school district in Indiana last month finally settled a free-speech dispute over suspensions it handed out to two students who had posted revealing photos of themselves online. ‘These cases are nothing new,’ says Mitchell Rubinstein, an adjunct law professor at New York Law School. ‘They’re not breaking any new legal ground because there is a lot of established precedent dealing with off-campus speech of students and this is just a different media that it’s occurring in.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Media Post, “TRUSTe Pans Microsoft’s Do-Not-Track Proposal.”

By Wendy Davis
June 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Online Privacy

“Privacy company TRUSTe has weighed in against Microsoft’s plan to turn on do-not-track by default in the next version of Internet Explorer. Questions about do-not-track headers also came up this morning at a House Judiciary Committee meeting about online privacy, where New York Law School professor James Grimmelmann expressed support for Microsoft’s plan.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Tech President.

The Reverse Review Magazine, “A HECM Hearing.”

By Jessica Linn
June 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty Houman Shadab
Subject: Reverse Mortgage

“Housing experts and reverse mortgage professionals testified before members of Congress last month in an oversight hearing established to examine the health and future of the FHA’s HECM program. Among those who testified were counseling representatives, including Daniel Fenton of Money Management International and Barbara Stucki of the National Council on Aging; AARP Policy Advisor Lori Trawinski; NRMLA President Peter Bell; CIS Chairman Jeffrey Lewis; HUD Deputy Assistant Secretary Charles Coulter; and two housing industry experts, New York Law School’s Houman Shadab and George Mason University’s Anthony Sanders.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “Parks Chief Steps Down After 10 Years.”

By Michael Howard Saul
June 18, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell & Carole Post
Subject: New Positions at NYLS

“Mayor Michael Bloomberg on Monday appointed a new commissioner to oversee New York City parks as the outgoing chief heads to a national nonprofit. Earlier this year, Anthony Crowell, who served as counselor to the mayor, left City Hall to become dean and president of New York Law School. Carole Post, who headed the city’s Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications, resigned in April amid controversy. She joined Mr. Crowell at the school.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Hill, “Overnight Tech: Lawmakers Move Against UN Regulation of the Internet.”

By Brendan Sasso
June 18, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: UN Control Over Internet

“Lawmakers on the House Energy and Commerce Committee will consider a resolution that would urge the Obama administration to oppose efforts to give the United Nations more control over the Internet. The witnesses will be Scott Shipman, associate general counsel for eBay; Morgan Reed, the executive director for the Association for Competitive Technology; Chris Babel, CEO of privacy company TRUSTe; and James Grimmelmann, a professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Everyday Citizen, “Presidents and the Supreme Court.”

By Angelo Lopez
June 18, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Book Reviews

“In the next week or so, the Supreme Court will be ruling on whether parts or all of Barack Obama’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, specifically the mandate on making people buy health insurance, is constitutional or not. This will have a major affect on the President’s prestige and political agenda, as this health care reform law is the President’s major achievement on domestic affairs. This is not the first time, however, that the President and the Supreme Court has clashed. James F. Simon, a Martin Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus at New York Law School, has written three books about different times in history where the Executive Office and the Supreme Court have had clashes over the limits of the federal government. “

To view this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “Google Appeal May Not Delay Trial.”

By Andrew Albanese
June 18, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google Appeal

“As we reported late last week, Google has filed a petition with the Second Circuit Court of Appeals asking for an immediate appeal of the Authors Guild’s class certification granted by Judge Denny Chin at the end of May. The ‘real surprise,’ contained in the filings, Grimmelmann added, is that Google has added former solicitor general Seth Waxman, to their team.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New Yorker, “Benched.”

By Jill Lepore
June 18, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: The Supreme Court and the struggle for judicial independence.

“Originally, the Supreme Court of the United States met in a drafty room on the second floor of an old stone building called the Merchants’ Exchange, at the corner of Broad and Water Streets, in New York. Three weeks after Hoover laid the cornerstone for the new Supreme Court Building, F.D.R. was elected President, defeating the incumbent by a record-breaking electoral vote: 472 to 59. As the New York Law School professor James F. Simon chronicles in ‘F.D.R. and Chief Justice Hughes: The President, the Supreme Court, and the Epic Battle Over the New Deal’ (Simon & Schuster), the President-elect immediately began lining up his legislative agenda.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Library Journal, “Google Appeals Class Action Certification.”

By Meredith Schwartz
June 15, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Fair Use of Google Books

“Google appealed Judge Denny Chin’s order granting the Authors Guild class certification in the ongoing litigation between the two over whether Google Books is fair use. ‘Obviously, Judge Chin won’t be one of the judges considering the appeal; this move does put his colleagues in the slightly unusual position of hearing an appeal from one of the fellow members of their court,’ Professor James Grimmelmann of New York Law School said on his blog, The Laboratorium.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Publishers Weekly, and Paid Content.

JD Journal, “Judge Yet to Issue Ruling on Cooley Law School Lawsuit.”

June 15, 2012

NYLS Lawsuit Dismissed
Subject: Law School Lawsuits

“A lawsuit filed in 2011 against Thomas. M. Cooley Law School will be ruled upon by a federal judge as to whether or not it can proceed very soon. In state court, a lawsuit against New York Law School has already been dismissed.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Inside Counsel.

Foreign Policy, “Obama’s Secret Hypocrisy.”

By Trevor Timm
June 15, 2012

NYLS Alum Trevor Timm ‘11
Subject: Classified Obama Info Leaked

“Since the New York Times published two important stories containing classified information two weeks ago — one being U.S. President Barack Obama’s “kill list” and another regarding a series of U.S. cyberattacks against Iran — Congress has been replete with bipartisan outrage. “

To view this article in full, click here.

The Washington Independent Review of Books, “Snapshots.”

By Robin Friedman
June 15, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Book Review

“James Simon, Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus at New York Law School, has written about constitutional confrontations between presidents and chief justices, including Jackson versus Marshall and Lincoln versus Taney. In his recent book, Simon explores the clash between President Franklin Roosevelt and Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes over New Deal legislation.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Village Voice, “Is Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Supersized Soda Ban Unconstitutional?”

By Victoria Bekiempis
June 14, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Botein
Subject: Ban on Supersized Soda

“Anyway, opponents of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s supersized soda ban might argue in court that the proposed measure is unconstitutional, citing the commerce clause as proof of its illegality. Not fully sure how this relates to soda, we gave Michael Botein a call. He started the Media Law Center at New York Law School but also knows a lot about Constitutional law, and was willing to talk with us generally about the clause.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Government Technology, “Gang of 7 Big-City CIOs Forges Ahead Despite Turnover.”

By Merrill Douglas
June 14, 2012

NYLS Executive Vice President Carole Post
Subject: New Position

“Despite turnover that has shaken up its ranks, an informal group of big-city IT executives known as the G7 is pushing forward with plans to establish a shared data repository that could become a foundation for multi-city apps and performance metrics. Carole Post, CIO and commissioner of the New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT), accepted a job as executive vice president and chief strategy officer for New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

ZDNet, “ACTA, TPP Limit Scope of Copyright Review.”

By Josh Taylor
June 13, 2012

NYLS Faculty Dan Hunter
Subject: Copyright Act Review

“The Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC), under the guidance of commissioner Jill McKeough, has been tasked with reviewing the Copyright Act to make sure that exemptions are still relevant, given the massive technological advancements since the legislation was last updated in 2004. The Department of Foreign Affairs has repeatedly asserted that ratifying both agreements would not require any change in intellectual property law in Australia as it stands today. This is a view shared by expatriate New York Law School professor Dan Hunter, who told an Intellectual Property Institute of Australia briefing in Sydney last night that Australian law is mostly compatible with the agreements — for now.”

To view this article in full, click here.

NPR, “Health Care Decision Hinges on a Crucial Clause.”

By Nina Totenberg
June 11, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Health Care

“All of Washington is breathlessly awaiting the Supreme Court’s imminent decision on the Obama health care overhaul. ‘The conservative majority started with the proposition that laissez-faire economics was good and that any intrusion by the state or the federal government was necessarily suspect,’ says New York Law School professor James Simon, author of a book about the court and the New Deal.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in WNYC.

Eureka-Wildwood Patch, “Should Children’s TV Selections and Use be Controlled?”

By Julie Brown Patton
June 11, 2012

NYLS Adjunct Brian Murphy
Subject: Parental Controls

“A total of 87 percent of U.S. parents think they do a better job of protecting kids than the government, according to a national coalition that opposes government control of TV programming and promotes the use of tools such as content ratings and parental controls. Individuals associated with TV Watch include: Brian Murphy, Adjunct Professor, New York Law School and partner, Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz.”

To view this article in full, click here. 

The National Law Journal, “Judge Rejects Cooley’s ABA/NALP Defense in Fraud Case.”

By Karen Sloan
June 8, 2012

NYLS Lawsuit Dismissed
Subject: Fraud Case

“The American Bar Association and NALP are not “indispensible absent parties” to a proposed fraud class action brought by 12 recent graduates against the Thomas M. Cooley Law School, a federal judge has ruled. ‘So far, we’re two for two on that,’ Strauss said, noting that a New York state trial judge in March rejected a similar argument by New York Law School before dismissing the larger suit.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The Huffington Post and Law and More.

LifeNews.com, “Senate Votes Monday on Obama Pro-Abortion Judicial Pick.”

By Steven Ertelt
June 8, 2012

NYLS Law Review
Subject: Obama’s Pro-Abortion Nominee

“The Senate will vote on Monday on Andrew Hurwitz, President Obama’s pro-abortion nominee to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. In 2002, when Hurwitz was 55 years old and already a justice on the Arizona supreme court, he authored an article titled, ‘Jon O. Newman and the Abortion Decisions,’ which appeared in the New York Law School Law Review. “

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The Blog of Legal Times here and here, and in America’s Conservative News.

CityBizList, “Tai-Heng Cheng Joins Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan as Partner.”

June 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty Tai-Heng Cheng
Subject: New Partner

“Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP announced today that Professor Tai-Heng Cheng will join the firm’s New York office as a partner in its International Arbitration Practice. “

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Kinney Recruiting.

New York Law Journal, “Speakers Offer Sage Advice to law School Graduates.”

By Laura Haring
June 8, 2012

NYLS Commencement 2012
Subject: Kenneth Feinberg Commencement speech

“Over the last month, nearly 6,000 J.D. and LL.M. students graduated from New York’s 15 law schools. Most were treated to sage advice from featured speakers. Kenneth Feinberg, the founder and managing partner of Feinberg Rozen, gave graduates at a May 21 commencement three pieces of advice. First, he said, ‘do not be afraid to assume new challenges, to choose the road not taken,’ adding that ‘we lawyers can point with pride to the role we have played in our nation’s history in pursuing the uncomfortable, the contrary view, often at odds with citizen sentiment.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
The Commencement Address can be found here.

Virtual-Strategy Magazine, “The Institute for Information Law & Policy at New York Law School Awarded $800K MacArthur Foundation Grant.”

June 7, 2012

NYLS’s IILP
Subject: MacArthur Foundation Grant

“The Institute for Information Law & Policy at New York Law School (NYLS) was awarded an $800,000 grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation to convene an interdisciplinary planning group of leading researchers, public sector innovators, and technologists to design and develop a research network to study the impact of network technology on democratic institutions in the United States and globally, announced Dean Anthony W. Crowell.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Red Orbit.

Opinio Juris, “Globalization and U.S. Sovereignty: The Contours of an Academic and Policy Debate.”

By Julian Ku
June 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty Tai-Heng Cheng
Subject: American Enterprise Institute Conference

“This past Monday, my Taming Globalization co-author John Yoo and I hosted a number of scholars at an American Enterprise Institute conference to discuss the impact of globalization on U.S. sovereignty. We were fortunate to have the participation of smart and interesting scholars like Tom Lee of Fordham Law, Tai-heng Cheng of New York Law School and Quinn Emanuel, our own Peter Spiro, Michael Glennon of Tufts, Jeremy Rabkin of George Mason, and John Fonte of the Hudson Institute. “

To view this article in full, click here.

The National Law Journal, “Experiential Legal Education.”

By Luke Bierman
June 4, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Experiential Education

“Schools such as City University of New York School of Law, Drexel University Earle Mack School of Law and Charlotte School of Law more recently have put experiential learning at the core of their programs. Still others, such as the University of Denver Sturm College of Law, the University of Colorado Law School, New York Law School and Vermont Law School, are organizing reforms across the curricula.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Crain’s Chicago Business, “Northwestern, Loyola Law Schools Eye Cutting Class Size.”

By Lorene Yue
June 4, 2012

NYLS Lawsuit Dismissed
Subject: Class Size

“Northwestern University’s law school, one of the top programs in the country, is considering shrinking its class size because of the continuing job crisis in the legal industry. Some graduates filed lawsuits in Cook County Circuit Court in February against DePaul University, John Marshall and IIT Chicago-Kent claiming that the job placement rates the law schools tout on their websites are misleading. A similar suit filed against New York Law School was dismissed by a New York Supreme Court judge in March.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Reuters, “Same-sex Marriage Cases Loom for Supreme Court.”

By Terry Baynes and Rebecca Hamilton
June 4, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same-sex Marriage

“For advocates and foes of same-sex marriage, two names have suddenly taken center stage in the legal universe: Kennedy and Romer. The Supreme Court has become increasingly concerned with states’ rights over the past 10 years, striking down numerous federal laws that intrude on state authority, said New York Law School professor Arthur Leonard.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “Eqypt Awaits a Verdict on Mubarak and Fallout.”

By David D. Kirkpatrick
June 1, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: Mubarak Trial

“On the third day of the protests that toppled Hosni Mubarak, Mohamed Amer Mohamed Hassanin saw through a haze of tear gas as the police fired live ammunition into the crowd in Tahrir Square. ‘It certainly doesn’t seem to address the many systemic issues that were at the heart of the protests,’ said Ruti G. Teitel, an expert on transitional justice at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “After Ruling, Google and Authors Guild Appear Headed for Trial.”

By Andrew Albanese
June 1, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google and Authors Guild Trial

“The battle is on. On May 31, Judge Denny Chin rejected Google’s motion to dismiss the Authors Guild as an associational Plaintiff, and granted the Authors Guild’s motion for class certification, meaning that Google’s library scanning program, barring another settlement, is headed to trial as a class action. ‘Point to the plaintiffs,’ observed New York Law School’s James Grimmelmann, on his blog, the Laboratorium. ‘This doesn’t resolve the merits of the lawsuit itself, but it does doom Google’s hopes of keeping the lawsuit from ever getting to the merits.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Library Journal.

Forbes, “Can Wall Street Reinvent Itself?”

By Bill Singer
June 1, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ronald Filler
Subject: Wall Street

“A few weeks ago I was asked by the Museum of the City of New York to participate on a panel with my fellow Forbes contributor and author of “Backstage Wall Street” Joshua Brown, and Marketplace radio’s bureau chief Heidi Moore on the topic of whether Wall Street can reinvent itself in response to the challenges of the 21st Century. The June 7th evening panel is part of the Museum’s exhibition Capital of Capital: New York’s Banks and the Creation of a Global Economy and will be moderated by Professor Ronald Filler of New York Law School’s Center on Financial Services Law.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The Reformed Broker.

New York Law Journal, “Graduating Without a Job: 12 Easy Tips to Becoming Market Ready.”

By Courtney Fitzgibbons
May 31, 2012

NYLS’s Courtney Fitzgibbons
Subject: Getting a job after graduation

“Congratulations to members of this year’s law school graduating class! Many of you are anxious about graduating without having secured post-graduation employment. And you are not seeing entry-level job postings, so you wonder, ‘Who will hire me?’ As someone who has counseled many 3Ls and recent law school graduates throughout the years, I have seen both positive and negative behavioral patterns that can influence the job searcher’s quest to find employment. You likely know about the value of bar associations and attending CLE programming. Thus, some of the tips below are intended to be creative and a little off the beaten path to help you gain some traction in this market before, during and after the bar.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Texas Lawyer.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle, “Torture in your Backyard.”

May 31, 2012

NYLS Adjunct Sarah Kerr
Subject: Solitary Confinement

“Tonight, the Social Justice Committee of The Oratory Church of St. Boniface will screen the documentary, “Solitary Confinement: Torture in Your Backyard,” as well as conduct a presentation and panel discussion at St. Francis College in Brooklyn Heights. Presenters include Rabbi Rachel Kahn-Troster, the director of North American Programs for Rabbis for Human Rights-North America; Sarah Kerr, a staff attorney at the Prisoners’ Rights Project of The Legal Aid Society in New York City.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “Google Suit Gets Class-Action Status.”

By Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg
May 31, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google Suit

“A New York federal judge on Thursday granted class-action certification to a seven-year-old lawsuit brought against Google Inc. for its efforts to electronically scan millions of books in public and university libraries and make them available online.”

To view this article in full, click here. (By subscription only.)
This news also appeared in The New York Times.

Above the Law, “Musical Chairs: Quinn Emanuel Picks Up Another Law Professor.”

By David Lat
May 30, 2012

NYLS Faculty Tai-Heng Cheng
Subject: New Partner

“Congratulations to Professor Tai-Heng Cheng of New York Law School. From the press release just issued by Quinn Emanuel: Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP announced today that Professor Tai-Heng Cheng will join the firm’s New York office as a partner in its International Arbitration Practice.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Global Arbitration ReviewThomson Reuters, (by subscription only,) Bloomberg Business Week,  and New York Law Journal.

Brownstoner, “160 Imlay Gets More Time on the Variance Clock.”

May 30, 2012

NYLS’s CITYLand Blog
Subject: 160 Imlay Street

“Frankly we’d forgotten what the status of 160 Imlay Street was until Curbed unearthed a recent update from a New York Law School blog called Cityland.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Ars Technica, “Broadcasters Finally Tell a Judge: Aereo’s Business Violates Copyright.”

By Nathan Mattise
May 30, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Aereo

“Broadcasters got the chance to officially begin their crusade to shut down TV streaming startup Aereo. Ars previously asked James Grimmelmann, a copyright scholar at New York Law School, to evaluate Aereo’s chances.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Virtual-Strategy Magazine, “Can Wall Street Reinvent Itself?”

May 29, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ronald Filler
Subject: Wall Street

“A panel of Wall Street analysts and observers discuss what needs to be done in order to fix the system, move forward, and keep New York competitive in the global marketplace. he program’s moderator is Ronald Filler, Professor of Law and Director of the Center on Financial Services Law, New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Media Post, “Can TV Survive Autohop?”

By Wendy Davis
May 25, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Autohop

“It’s fair to say that people always had ways to avoid commercials on TV. Long before the days of the VCR, people who didn’t want to watch the ads would stretch their legs, get a snack, or change channels during the commercials. Copyright expert James Grimmelmann, a professor at New York Law School, tells MediaPost that the networks can make the argument that this technology allows users to go beyond time-shifting.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Washington Post, “Henry Denker, Prolific Playwright and Novelist, Dies at 99.”

By Matt Schudel
May 24, 2012

NYLS Alum Henry Denker ’34
Subject: Obituary

“Henry Denker, a prolific novelist and playwright who may be best known for writing a long-running radio dramatization of the life of Jesus, ‘The Greatest Story Ever Told,’ died May 15 at his home in New York City. He was 99. The New York Times reported that he had lung cancer.”

To view this article in full, click here. 

City Ethics, “The Gap Between Advice and Enforcement, and the Isolation of Independence.”

By Robert Wechsler
May 24, 2012

NYLS’s Center for NYC Law
Subject: NYLS Panel

“I was on a panel this week as part of the annual Citywide Seminar on Ethics in New York City Government, co-sponsored by the New York City Conflicts of Interest Board (COIB) and the Center for New York City Law at the New York Law School. The panel was called ‘Challenges & Solutions in Government Ethics in Other Municipalities.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “High Noon for Diller’s Aereo.”

By Christopher S. Stewart and Merissa Marr
May 24, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Barry Diller

“When Barry Diller backed a start-up that streams local broadcast signals over the Internet, it looked like another unorthodox move by a famously offbeat mogul. Now that start-up has become a grenade that is threatening to wound the television industry.”

To view this article in full, click here.
(By subscription only.)

The Village Voice, “Here’s Why Thomas F. O’Mara and Dean Murray Want to Ban Anonymous Online Speech.”

By Victoria Bekiempis
May 23, 2012

NYLS Faculty Jethro Lieberman
Subject: Anonymous Online Speech

“Earlier today, the Voice brought you news of pending legislation in Albany that would make New York-based websites, such as blogs and newspapers, ‘remove any comments posted on his or her website by an anonymous poster unless such anonymous poster agrees to attach his or her name to the post.’ We still wondered: Would a measure like this even be Constitutional? Jethro Lieberman, a Constitutional rights expert and faculty member at New York Law School, doesn’t think so.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “Single and Off the Fast Track.”

By Sue Shellenbarger
May 23, 2012

NYLS Faculty Anne Marie Bowler
Subject: Single and Self-Employed

“Anne Marie Bowler left work one day last week to enjoy dinner with a friend at a sidewalk café “before the sun went down,” she says. Recently she ducked out of the office to attend a charity golf outing. And Ms. Bowler also likes to make time for long evening bike rides through Central Park. She could never have done these things at her old job.”

To view this article in full, click here.

CBS New York, “New York Law School Grad Crosses Stage with Guide Dog.”

May 22, 2012

NYLS Alum Amanda Davis ‘12
Subject: Seeing Eye Dog at Graduation

To view this video, click here.

This news also appeared on WNBCTV, Yahoo News, Daily News, JezebelJD JournalWeb Vet, and CBS News 12. 

Reverse Mortgage Daily, “Will FHA Make Way for More Private Reverse Mortgages?”

By Elizabeth Ecker
May 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty Houman Shadab
Subject: Reverse Mortgages

“Take the stress off of FHA and make way for private reverse mortgage products, was the message presented by two housing academics in testimony presented before a Congressional panel earlier this month. The progression might not be such a long way off, they said. ‘Conventional reverse mortgages will likely increase in market share as the economy recovers, housing prices stabilize, and credit conditions improve,’ Houman Shadab, Associate Professor of Law at New York Law School told the panel.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Bloomberg BNA, “Section 5 of Voting Rights Act Still Needed; Withstands Direct Attack by Alabama County.”

By Bernard J. Pazanowski
May 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: Voting Rights Act

A key provision of the Voting Rights Act that requires certain jurisdictions to get changes in their voting procedures cleared by the Justice Department or a federal district court before they take effect is constitutional, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit held May 18 (Shelby County, Ala. v. Holder, D.C. Cir., No. 11-5256, 5/18/12). Professor Deborah N. Archer, Racial Justice Project, New York Law School, who filed an amicus brief in the case, also told BNA May 18 that ‘‘the opinion is critically important in the ongoing battle for fair and effective participation in our political process.”

This article is available by subscription only.

Daily Report, “Fair Use Limits Set in Ga. State Digital Copying Decision.”

By Alyson M. Palmer
May 21, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Fair Use Limits

“An Atlanta federal judge has set the standard for when schools can give their students access to excerpts of copyrighted works without paying licensing fees — although her approach may be revisited in a potential appeal by publishers who had challenged practices at Georgia State University. Associate Professor James Grimmelmann of New York Law School said it was difficult to find fault with Evans’ decisions on each of the individual claims of infringement.”

To view this article in full, click here. 

Publishers Weekly, “What the Georgia State Verdict Means for Libraries and the Publishing Industry.”

By Andrew Albanese
May 18, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Publishing and Libraries

“A “high-profile defeat” for publishers is how Brandon Butler, director of public policy initiatives at the Association of Research Libraries, described the May 11 verdict in Cambridge University Press et. al. v. Mark Becker et. al., a closely watched copyright case involving the use of electronic course reserves at Georgia State University. ‘I expect to see fair-use e-reserves codes that treat under 10% as presumptively okay,’ blogged New York Law School’s James Grimmelmann, ‘and amounts over 10% but less than some ill-defined maximum as presumptively okay if… a license to make digital copies of excerpts from the book is not available.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Benzinga, “Prominent Attorney Kenneth R. Feinberg to speak at New York Law School’s 120th Commencement, May 21.”

May 17, 2012

NYLS Commencement 2012
Subject: Kenneth Feinberg Commencement speech

“Kenneth R. Feinberg, one of the nation’s leading experts in mediation and alternative dispute resolution, will address the graduates at New York Law School’s 120th Commencement on Monday, May 21, 2012, at Radio City Music Hall at 11 a.m.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Digital Journal. 

NPR, “’Canal Zone’ Collages Test the Meaning of ‘Fair Use.’”

By Joel Rose
May 16, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Fair Use

“Richard Prince is an art world superstar. His paintings sell for millions, and many hang in the world’s great museums. ‘In this particular case, Mr. Prince testified about what his purpose was,’ Cariou’s lawyer Daniel Brooks said at a recent panel discussion at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Prague Post, “Death Penalty Advocate Speaks.”

By Benjamin Cunningham
May 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty Robert Blecker
Subject: Death Penalty

“Death becomes Robert Blecker. As a leading advocate of the death penalty, the New York-based law professor makes a highly rational argument in favor of capital punishment, even if the overall rationale for the policy itself remains in question.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Inside Higher Ed, “E-Reservations.”

By Steve Kolowich
May 15, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: E-Reservations

“As librarians and lawyers continue to pore over the 350 pages of a long-awaited federal court decision involving copyright claims levied against Georgia State University’s library by academic publishers, one thing everybody seems to agree on is that, all things considered, the university ‘won.’ ‘This [decision] provides so much specific guidance about quantities of material that I expect it will be used as a sort of default setting” as other academic libraries set about writing their own e-reserve policies, said James Grimmelmann, an associate professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in the Library Journal and Publishers Weekly.

New Jersey Newsroom, “N.J. Needs a Justice Center for Protection of Developmentally Disabled.”

By Salvator Pizzuro
May 15, 2012

NYLS Alum Salvatore Pizzuro
Subject: New Jersey Justice Center

“Since the Governor created the “Taskforce on the Closing of New Jersey’s Developmental Centers”, this writer has been inundated with telephone calls, letters, and email messages from the families of people with disabilities who have been abused in New Jersey’s residential facilities, group homes, and nursing homes.”

To view this article in full, click here.

WKWOW, “Former New York State Judges Join Experts in Calling for Juvenile Justice Reform in New York in NYLS Law Review.”

May 15, 2012

NYLS Law Review
Subject: Juvenile Justice

“Just weeks after New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo highlighted the need for reform of the state’s juvenile justice system by including in his 2012–2013 budget the Close to Home Initiative, which would allow New York City to take custody of low-level juvenile offenders by removing them from youth prisons and housing them in their own communities, Judith S. Kaye, former Chief Judge of New York and now Of Counsel for Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP; Michael A. Corriero, Executive Director of the New York Center for Juvenile Justice and a former New York State judge; and Jeremy Travis, President of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, the City University of New York, join several juvenile justice experts in an in-depth examination of all phases of New York’s juvenile justice system. This call for reform of what some see as New York’s outdated approach to juvenile justice appears in the latest issue of the New York Law School Law Review.”

Opinio Juris, “Human Rights: Political Not Metaphysical.”

By Ruti Teitel
May 14, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: Human Rights

“Sam Moyn, writing in this Sunday’s New York Times (“Human Rights, Not So Pure Anymore”) claims the current relationship of human rights is compromised, and nostalgizes the past.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Mbl.is, Velkomin(n) í Greinasafn Morgunblaðsins

May 13, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: Icelandic Media

To view this article in full, click here.

Library Journal, “Google, Author’s Guild Clash Over Class Action and Standing.”

By Meredith Schwartz
May 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google Books Case

“Judge Chin heard oral argument in the Google Books case on May 4 and ultimately reserved decision. The parties will go ahead with their summary judgment motions, with oral argument scheduled for September. According to New York Law School professor James Grimmelmann’s Labortorium blog, Google argued that individual authors, not the Author’s Guild, should be the plaintiff because each author will present sufficiently different issues that their individual participation will be required.”

To view this article in full, click here.

WND, “False Sex-Assault Convictions Easier Under Obama.”

By Bob Unruh
May 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Sexual Assault in schools

“How many other Caleb Warners are out there? That’s the focus of a new letter to the Obama administration that pleads with officials to remove a threat to students the Department of Education created a year ago with directions that on-campus sexual assault cases be determined on a low-level ‘preponderance of evidence’ standard of proof. Signers included…Nadine Strossen of New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Digital Journal, “Op-Ed: Are We Overdosed or Overmedicated?”

By Yukio Strachan
May 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty Michael Perlin
Subject: Medication for the mentally ill

The popular belief that we’re “overdosed and overmedicated” is not rooted in reality but rather in a blatant prejudice against the mentally ill. Speaking about psychiatrists who testify in court as expert witnesses, Michael L. Perlin told forensic experts at the annual meeting of the American College of Forensic Psychiatry that Mental health experts are not immune to having a “pervasive prejudice against the mentally ill. ‘Psychiatrists are not immune from the same prejudice that affects lawyers and judges and jurors and cops and newspaper headline writers,’ said Perlin, a professor of law who serves as director of the International Mental Disability Law Reform Project and the Online Mental Disability Law Program at New York Law School, New York City.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Nevada Public Radio, “Registering Ex-Inmates to Vote.”

May 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty Erika Wood
Subject: Ex-Inmates and voting

“After Antoinette Banks served time for a bogus check conviction, she left prison thinking she’d never be able to vote again. She was wrong.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Issaquah Press, “King County Library System’s Internet Policy is Unchanged After Court Ruling.”

By Warren Kagarise
May 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Library Internet Policy

“The use of software to filter Internet content for library patrons received support in a recent federal court ruling. Nadine Strossen, a New York Law School professor and former American Civil Liberties Union national president, advised library system staffers on Internet policies at a recent retreat.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Reverse Mortgage Daily, “Reverse Mortgages Take Center Stage in Upcoming Congressional Hearing.”

By Elizabeth Ecker
May 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty: Houman Shadab
Subject: Reverse Mortgages

“Reverse mortgage industry participants as well as non-affiliated housing experts will testify before members of Congress Wednesday in a hearing titled, ‘Oversight of the Federal Housing Administration’s Reverse Mortgage Program for Seniors.’ AARP representative Lori Trawinski, Senior Strategic Policy Advisor, Consumer and State Affairs Team for AARP’s Public Policy Institute is scheduled to give testimony, as are two housing industry experts: New York Law School associated professor Houman Shadab and George Mason University professor of real estate finance, Anthony Sanders.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Mortgage Professional Magazine.

The Wall Street Journal, “Task Force Members.”

May 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty Anne Marie Bowler
Subject: Task-Force members

“Anne Marie Bowler Co-founding Partner, Gabay-Rafiy & Bowler.”

To view this article in full, click here.

All Voices, “Obama’s Secret Weapon for Debates Against Romney: John Kerry.”

By Punditty
May 7, 2012

NYLS’s Sydney Shainwald Lecture
Subject: Kerry on Romney

“John Kerry, the 2004 Democratic presidential nominee and five-term incumbent senator from the Bay State, may be just the guy to give Obama the upper hand when the presidential debates roll around. Kerry spoke at the New York Law School in March, giving reporters from Politicker a chance to ask him if he thought Romney was shifting positions toward the center now that it appeared he would be the nominee.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Florida Times-Union, “Fact Check: Does a New Law Restrict Protests and Violate the First Amendment?”

By Carole Fader
May 6, 2012

NYLS Student Russell Smith
Subject: H.R. 347

“Many Times-Union readers want to know: I received an email that says that H.R. 347, signed into law by President Barack Obama, forbids anyone from protesting in the presence of the Secret Service. And that essentially means you can’t protest in front of Obama. Is this true? This is a law that has spawned a lot of debate. Russell Smith, who blogs for the New York Law School’s Program in Law and Journalism, wrote: ‘… Since police can arrest and remove anyone in violation of [someone jumping the White House fence], the government doesn’t need H.R. 347 in order to protect its property from damage and its officials from intruders.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Constitutional Law Prof Blog, “Saturday Evening Review: Constitutionalism Beyond SCOTUS.”

By Doni Gewirtzman
May 5, 2012

NYLS Faculty Doni Gewirtzman
Subject: Lower Court Constitutionalism

“The role of the “lower” federal courts in shaping constitutional doctrine as it is taught and theorized can be under-rated. Many ConLawProfs have strategies to combat SCOTUS-dominance in our classrooms given our understandings about how constitutional law is actually practiced. But often our discussions of ‘lower court’ decisions are refracted through SCOTUS opinions as well as being very doctrinally focused.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Transportation Nation, “42 Bike Share Docks for Lower Manhattan Revealed in Semi-Public Rollout.”

By Jim O’Grady
May 3, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Bike Share Docks

“The New York City Department of Transportation continues to show community boards in Brooklyn and Manhattan where it’s planning to install Bike Share stations in those boroughs. Kate Fillin-Yeh, director of New York City Bikeshare, said any proposed location that had been red-flagged in a previous meeting did not make the cut. She said the department tried to spread the the bike docks evenly throughout Lower Manhattan, and place them near subway stations, large institutions like New York Law School, and tourist sites like south Street Seaport and the boat to the Statue of Liberty.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Escapist, “Teller Sues Over ‘Stolen Magic Trick.’”

By Andy Chalk
May 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Stolen Trick

“Performed by Teller, the smaller, quieter half of the magical duo Penn and Teller, the ‘Shadows’ illusion [which is playing below for the benefit of those of you who haven’t seen it] is pretty impressive stuff. New York Law School Professor James Grimmelmann told Ars Technica that copyright law protects pantomimes and ‘choreographed works,’ so Teller’s case could very well come down to how closely Bakardy’s performance matches his own.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Time at High Court Was High Point in Career, Ex-Clerks Say.”

By Joel Stashenko
May 1, 2012

NYLS Graduates
Subject: NYLS graduates equal to Ivy League

“While the food in Albany can be pedestrian, the pay poor by New York City standards, the workload unreasonable and the winter weather miserable, a new crop of attorneys will leap at the opportunity to become a clerk in 2012 for judges on the state Court of Appeals. Howard Levine, a Yale Law graduate and Court of Appeals judge from 1993-2002, said he found the products of Albany Law, New York Law School, Brooklyn Law and St. John’s Law to be the equal of those from the more ‘elite’ and Ivy League schools.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Thomson Reuters, “Breakingviews: U.S. Legal Profession Makes Case For Its Critics.”

By Reynolds Holding
May 1, 2012

NYLS Lawsuit
Subject: Lawsuit Dropped

“The U.S. legal profession is making a slam-dunk case for its critics. Lawyers have pleaded guilty to insider trading. Law schools are fudging data on their students’ jobs prospects. In February, scores of law grads sued their alma maters for exaggerating the odds of landing a job. A judge dismissed the suit against New York Law School in March, but remaining cases raise serious issues.”

This article available by subscription only.

Mac News World, “Google, FCC Shutdown Spotlights Technology Law Lag.”

By Peter Suciu
April 30, 2012

NYLS Faculty David Johnson
Subject: Technology Law Lag

“Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) is trying to do damage control and prove it had no nefarious goals with its ambitious Street View project, following an FCC into the search giant’s collection and storage of data from millions of unknowing households across the country. Although the FCC concluded in its report that collecting the data was not illegal, one question the controversy highlights is whether laws have failed to keep pace with technology. ’Yes and no,’ said David Johnson, visiting professor of law at New York Law School. ‘The Electronic Communications Privacy Act (1986) exempts communication that is readily out there. Things such as low wattage radio signals, for example, are not protected by the wiretap laws.’”

To read this article in full, click here.

Publishers Weekly, “In Amicus Brief, Library Groups Assail Authors Guild Bid to Shutter HathiTrust.”

By Andrew Albanese
April 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: HathiTrust

“According to an amicus brief prepared by Jonathan Band, on behalf of three major library organizations, the motion for partial summary judgment filed in February by the Authors Guild in its lawsuit against the HathiTrust reflects a deeply flawed, distorted view of libraries’ rights. In its motion for partial judgment, Authors Guild attorneys hold that the HatiTrust’s mass digitization and orphan works projects do not qualify for any ‘defense recognized by copyright law,’ observed New York Law School’s James Grimmelmann, who called the motion ‘a doozy.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Foreign Policy, “Down with CISPA.”

By Trevor Timm
April 27, 2012

NYLS Alum Trevor Timm (’11)
Subject: CISPA

“On Thursday, April 26, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), the first major Internet-regulation bill Congress has tried to pass since mass protests led to the spectacular collapse of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in January. CISPA, while aimed at a much different subject, gained much the same ire as SOPA, given its potential effect on Internet freedom.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This article is available by subscription only.

The Saratogian, “‘Judge Judy’ to Deliver UAlbany Commencement Address.”

April 26, 2012

NYLS Alum Judge Judith Sheindlin
Subject: Commencement speech

“Judge Judith Sheindlin, the presiding judge on television’s ‘Judge Judy,’ will deliver the undergraduate keynote address at the University at Albany’s 2012 Commencement Ceremony at 10 a.m. Sunday, May 20, on the campus’s Grand Entry Plaza. Approximately 2,800 students are expected to graduate at the 168th Commencement ceremonies.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Gay City News, “Tim Sweeney, In Return NYC Visit, Feted by GMHC.”

By Paul Schindler
April 25, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: LGBT Movement

“In marking its 30th anniversary with a Gotham Hall gala, Gay Men’s Health Crisis, the world’s oldest AIDS services and advocacy group, reached back 19 years to honor a former executive director, Tim Sweeney, who for two decades held pivotal leadership posts in AIDS and LGBT civil rights work in New York before assuming his current role as head of the Colorado-based Gill Foundation. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was also enacted in 1990, which formalized many of the protections that legal advocates for those living with AIDS had been pressing for during the previous half-dozen years or so. Though the ADA was a landmark in disability law, New York Law School Professor Arthur Leonard, in numerous stories in these pages, has documented how federal courts on many occasions have constrained the scope of the important protections the law could provide to the HIV-infected.”

Los Angeles Times, “Unemployment is a Special Challenge for Veterans.”

By David Zucchino
April 25, 2012

NYLS Alum Matthew Pizzo (’11)
Subject: Unemployment and veterans

“Matt Pizzo has a law degree, can-do attitude, proven leadership skills, and expertise in communications and satellite technology from his four years in the Air Force. Yet the 29-year-old has been told that he’s overqualified, too old, too ‘non-traditional,’ and that he’s fallen behind his civilian contemporaries.”

To view this article, click here. 

The National Law Journal, “Baltimore Looks to Justice Department for its Next Dean.”

By Karen Sloan
April 25, 2012

NYLS’s New Dean
Subject: New dean appointed

“The University of Baltimore School of Law’s next dean comes not from legal academia, but from the U.S. Department of Justice. It is relatively unusual for law schools to tap deans with little or no experience in legal academia, although New York Law School and Brooklyn Law School recently named deans from government and law practice, respectively.”

Star Ledger, “ALEC Laws Still a Threat to N.J.”

By Joanne Doroshow
April 24, 2012

NYLS’s Joanne Doroshow
Subject: ALEC laws

“Early this month, The Star-Ledger’s Salvador Rizzo wrote a groundbreaking report on the American Legislative Exchange Council, the influential organization that has promoted the agenda of corporate America and the political right in state legislatures nationwide, including New Jersey. Until now, ALEC’s corporate backers have had little problem with the organization’s range of issues, such as controversial voter-identification laws.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “1 in 5 Law School Grads Find Jobs at Small Firms, ABA Reports.”

By Laura Haring
April 23, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Graduate Employment Statistics

“Nearly 20 percent of students who graduated from New York’s 15 law schools in 2010 were employed by firms with 50 or fewer attorneys nine months after graduation, new data released by the American Bar Association shows. New York Law School sent 26 percent of its 481-member 2010 class to firms with fewer than 50 attorneys, with 82 percent of those students working in offices with fewer than 10 attorneys.”

To view this article in full, click here.

LLM Guide, “NYLS to Start American Business Law LL.M. Program.”

April 23, 2012

NYLS’s new LL.M. program
Subject: New program

“New York Law School (NYLS) has announced it will begin a new LL.M. program in American Business Law beginning in the fall. The program is students holding holding JD-equivalent foreign law degrees.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New Jersey Newsroom, “New Jersey’s ‘Crosswalk Law’ Needs to be Enforced.”

By Salvatore Pizzuro
April 23, 2012

NYLS Alum Salvatore Pizzuro
Subject: Crosswalk Law

“A few weeks ago, this writer reported that New Jersey’s ‘Crosswalk Law’ may be the most ignored legal measure of all time. Public Law 2009, passed by the Legislature and signed by Governor Jon Corzine on January 18, 2010, requires motorists to come to a complete stop at a crosswalk when a pedestrian is crossing a street and to remain stopped until the pedestrian safely reaches the opposite sidewalk.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Zimbio, “Bill Clinton: Popular, Opinionated, and Still Relevant.”

By Tara Krieger
April 22, 2012

NYLS Legal As She is Spoke’s article re-posted
Subject: Bill Clinton

“President Obama assured him it would be ‘just like riding a bicycle.’ The ex-president would remember what to do. But former President Bill Clinton described that night in December 2010 when Mr. Obama ceded him the White House podium another way. ‘So weird.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Guardian, “Google v Oracle: A Far-Reaching Trial of Characters as Much as Copyright.”

By Charles Arthur
April 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty Mark Webbink
Subject: Google v. Oracle

“Though Microsoft survived the subsequent court-ordered sanctions, it was never the same again. And the effect could be just as significant if Oracle wins. It would, say observers, give copyright protection to elements of a computer language known as ‘APIs’ – application programming interfaces – that tell software how to carry out specified commands. ‘That could potentially turn the industry on its head,’ Mark Webbink, executive director of the Centre for Patent Innovations at New York Law School, told the San Francisco Mercury.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The Telegraph.

The New York Times, “Live Near a Great School? It’s Costing You.”

By Mary Ann Giordano
April 20, 2012

NYLS’s Street Law Moot Court Competition
Subject: Street Law program

“Here is some of what is going on in education on Friday: Students at Middle School 22 in the South Bronx will participate in a moot court competition at New York Law school from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m., and 12:15 to 1:45 p.m. The event is the culmination of their work with Street Law, a program brought in by the assistant principal, Joshua Brookstein, ‘to instruct, guide and mentor young, at-risk kids in skills such as critical thinking and public speaking, as well as the rights of the people.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared here.

Tech President, “Riding Disgust Over GSA Scandal, Bill that Would Bolster Tracking of Federal Spending Heads Towards House Floor.”

By Sarah Lai Stirland
April 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Simone Noveck
Subject: Federal spending

“A new coalition of private companies, chaired by Issa’s former Oversight Committee counsel, Hudson Hollister, also launched this week to promote legislation related to technology and transparency. The coalition of 13 tech vendors and a non-profit association of certified public accountants from Maryland launched this week with the goal of promoting more transparency across the government by encouraging proposals such as the DATA Act. Its advisory board include the Recovery Board’s Devaney, Eric Gillespie, a managing partner at Viano Capital, an investment firm specializing in data and information services firms, Jim Harper, the Cato Institute’s director of information policy studies, New York Law School’s Beth Simone Noveck, a law professor and former White House deputy chief technology officer, and Campbell Pryde, the President and CEO of XBRL US. (XBRL stands for Extensible Business Reporting Language.)”

To view this article in full, click here.

Bloomberg Business Week, “Law Firms Paying Price.”

By Paul Barrett
April 18, 2012

New York Law School’s Lawsuit
Subject: Lawsuit dropped

“Partnership doesn’t nurture broad-minded managers skilled in running sizable operations. One such suit filed against New York Law School was dismissed in March by a judge who said aspiring attorneys should know the concept of caveat emptor.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Legal Skills Prof Blog, Find LawSlate, and Thomson Reuters (by subscription only).

Tech President, “To Write Open Data Standards, New York Opens the Floor.”

By Miranda Beubauer
April 18, 2012

NYLS Executive Vice President Carole Post
Subject: Carole Post Joins NYLS

“New York City’s Department of Information Technology & Telecommunications has created a wiki for the public to help contribute to the implementation of the city’s recently passed open data legislation. According to the wiki, DoITT will also be hosting two events related to its open data plans during Internet Week. The announcement comes after one of the key figures in the open data bill’s creation, DoITT Commissioner Carole Post, announced her resignation Friday.”

To view this article, click here. 
This news also appeared in Government TechnologyInformation Week, and Computing.co.uk.

City Journal, “Vegan Cops.”

By Steve Cohen
April 18, 2012

Student Steve Cohen
Subject: Officers shot

In February, Detective Kevin Herlihy became the third NYPD cop shot in two months. Herlihy was comparatively fortunate; he managed to fire his weapon and kill his attacker, who was being sought for shooting his girlfriend’s daughter. Since then, five more police officers have already been shot.

To view this article in full, click here.

San Francisco Chronicle, “A Case Could Turn Software Industry on its Head.”

By James Temple
April 18, 2012

NYLS Faculty Mark Webbink
Subject: Oracle vs. Google

“The legal showdown between Silicon Valley giants Oracle and Google could test the very boundaries of copyright protections for software and rewrite the rules for much of the industry. ’Should Oracle be able to convince the court (that the APIs) are fully protected by copyright and were substantially copied by Google, that could potentially turn the industry on its head,’ said Mark Webbink, executive director of the Center for Patent Innovations at New York Law School, in an e-mail interview.”

The New York Times, “Why Are Charter Schools Exempt from Bullying Law?”

By Udi Ofer
April 13, 2012

NYLS Faculty Udi Ofer
Subject: Bullying

“New York State’s heralded anti-bullying law is about to go into effect July 1. But the state Board of Regents recently took some teeth out of the law, known as the Dignity Act, when it said that charter schools don’t have to provide in-class instruction to schoolchildren about the dangers of discrimination and harassment, leaving their students without a key protection from bullying.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “No Chatting in the Lobby.”

By Jay Romano
April 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Lucas Ferrara
Subject: Rent increase

“’Unless a residential unit is subject to some form of rent regulation, an owner is typically free to charge whatever rent the market will bear,’ said Lucas A. Ferrara, an adjunct professor at New York Law School and a Manhattan real estate lawyer.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Bloomberg TV, “Vague Definitions in CISPA Raise Concerns of SOPA 2.0”

April 12, 2012

Alums Trevor Timm (’11) and Anthony Lee Pacchia (’06)
Subject: Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act

“Trevor Timm, activist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, talks with Bloomberg Law’s Lee Pacchia about the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), a new bill that attempts to regulate the internet by allowing companies to share internet user data with each other and the federal government for the purpose of protecting against the ‘vulnerability of, or threat to, a system or network of a government or private entity.’”

To view this interview in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “Tech Commissioner Leaving to Join NYLS.”

April 12, 2012

NYLS Executive Vice President Carole Post
Subject: Carole Post joins NYLS

“New York City’s commissioner of the Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications is leaving her post to join New York Law School.”

This news also appeared in Government TechnologyNY1, the New York Post, and WNYC.

Global Warming, “How EPA Uses ‘Sue and Settle’ Agreements to Steal Power from the States (and what the Congress is doing to stop it.”

By William Yeatman
April 11, 2012

NYLS Faculty David Schoenbrod & Ross Sandler
Subject: “Sue and settle” agreements

“In late March, the House Judiciary Committee passed H.R. 3862, the Sunshine for Regulatory Decrees and Settlements Act of 2012, by a 20-10 vote. If enacted, the bill would make it more difficult for the Environmental Protection Agency to negotiate ‘sue and settle’ agreements that effectively exclude States from environmental policymaking, in seeming contravention of the Clean Air Act. There are several troubling implications of these ‘sue and settle’ consent decrees. For starters, they allow unelected environmentalist lawyers to create policy. Moreover, consent decrees are difficult to reverse, which means that a sitting President can use them to bind the discretion of his or her successor. (This point was aptly explained to the Judiciary Committee by New York Law School Professors David Schoenbrod and Ross Sandler.)”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Nonprofit Press, “Calendar of Events.”

April 10, 2012

NYLS’s Rooftop Conference
Subject: Property Perspectives for Not-for-Profit Organizations

“What is the role of real estate occupied by not-for-profit organizations in connection with their charitable purposes? How does real estate (whether owned, leased, or in space hosted by others) present mission-related strategic choices, opportunities, and challenges, especially in today’s tough environment?”

To view this article in full, click here.

Internet Evolution, “Senators Seek To Limit Employer Scouting on Facebook.”

By Steven Bennett
April 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty Steven Bennett
Subject: Releasing social networking passwords to employers

“Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) and Charles Schumer (D-NY) recently wrote to the US Attorney General and the Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), referring to a ‘disturbing trend’ of employers demanding that job applicants provide their user names and passwords for social networking and email Websites, to permit employers to review such information as part of the interview process.”

ARTINFO, “6 Points Worth Pondering from Last Night’s Appropriation Art Smack-Down at New York Law School.”

By Shane Ferro
April 10, 2012

NYLS’s Art in the Digital Age
Subject: Key points from Art in the Digital Age panel

“Three hours into last night’s New York Law School double panel on appropriation art in the digital age, Sergio Sarmiento, an artist and lawyer who serves as the associate director for Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts in New York City, said the one thing that no one else had thought to bring up after endless circling through the pros and cons of current copyright law: Why do we care so much?”

To view this article in full, click here.

California Lawyer, “Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against NY Law School.”

April 9, 2012

NYLS Lawsuit
Subject: Lawsuit dropped

“New York Supreme Court Judge Melvin L. Schweitzer dismissed a lawsuit lodged by nine graduates of New York Law School who accused the latter of misleading them about their employment prospects after graduation, reports the New York Times. “

To view this article in full, click here. 
This news also appeared in Bloomberg BNA and the New York Law Journal.

Women 2.0, “Women in the Law, We’re Building an App For You.”

By Lynnett Brooks
April 9, 2012

NYLS Student Lynnett Brooks
Subject: Law Without Walls

“By way of introduction, three law students from New York Law School, University of Miami School of Law, and School of Transnational Law, Peking University. We are part of a program called Law Without Walls where we are prompted to identify a problem or ‘gap’ area within our topic in order to design a project to solve the problem using a method that incorporates innovation and technology.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Careerist, “Law School News- Baylor Law’s Big Fiasco and Job Openings for Deans.”

By Vivia Chen
April 9, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell
Subject: New dean and president

“Similar story with the much-maligned New York Law School, which recently hired Anthony Crowell as its new dean and president. Crowell is a battle-hardy veteran of New York City politics, reports The National Law Journal. Most recently, he was counselor to New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, overseeing city agencies and government reform efforts.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Inside Higher Ed and Gotham Schools.

Crains New York Business, “Gridlock Sam.”

By Jeremy Smerd
April 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty David Schoenbrod
Subject: Mass transit and tolls

To drive the city with the man New Yorkers known as Gridlock Sam is to behold a mess of potholed pavement and backward policy. Congress promised mass-transit aid in exchange for deep-sixing the toll plan, ultimately passing a law that made an end-run around the court-mandated bridge tolls. ‘What we got was the mechanism to fund transit, and it turned out to be billions of dollars,’ said David Schoenbrod, a lawyer at the time for the Natural Resources Defense Council and now a professor at New York Law School and an American Enterprise Institute visiting scholar. ‘I regard that as a huge victory for the environment and the city.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “Florida. How Soon We Forget.”

By Erika Wood
April 5, 2012

NYLS Faculty Erika Wood
Subject: Florida election laws

“Last spring, Florida made some changes to its election law. Cloaked as technical tweaks, the new laws have the potential to swing the 2012 election. When it comes to presidential elections, Florida matters. With 29 electoral votes, Florida is by far the most influential swing state in the country. Who gets to vote in Florida could determine who will win the election.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Media Post, “Appeals Court Gives Viacom Second Shot at YouTube.”

By Wendy Davis
April 5, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Lawsuit against Google’s YouTube

“In a mixed ruling, a federal appeals court on Thursday revived Viacom’s copyright infringement lawsuit against Google’s YouTube. ‘Google avoided any holdings that would have been an absolute loss for it,’ says James Grimmelmann, a professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

National Journal, “5-4 and 50-50.”

By Ronald Brownstein
April 5, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Supreme Court decision on health care

“The Supreme Court’s oral arguments on health care last week offered a nightmare preview of what could await Washington after the 2012 election: a political system that is closely, deeply, and even bitterly divided. The coming Supreme Court decision on health care could escalate this confrontation like a grenade rolled into a bar fight. Substantively, the case represents the most important constitutional challenge to the federal government’s power since the epic decisions when a conservative Court invalidated key pillars of President Roosevelt’s New Deal in 1935 and 1936, notes New York Law School professor James Simon, author of a recent history of that period, FDR and Chief Justice Hughes.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “When the President Predicts Victory in the Supreme Court.”

By Joe Palazzolo
April 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: The President and the Supreme Court

“How should the President interact publicly with the Supreme Court? The WSJ story today by Laura Meckler and Carol E. Lee quotes James Simon, a professor at New York Law School: ‘I can’t think of a president anticipating a court decision as Mr. Obama has done and basically arguing in favor’ of his side. Mr. Simon, the author of several books on conflicts between presidents and the court, said, ‘Jefferson was very angry at the Marshall Court, but he [complained] in private,’ as did most other presidents.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Active Rain.

The Manhattan Institute interview

April 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Health Care cases

Nadine Strossen interviewed by The Manhattan Institute discussing the health care cases as argued before the U.S. Supreme Court and the constitutional issues.

The podcast can be accessed here.

Metro Weekly, “Immigration Equality Files DOMA Challenge, Obama Administration Left Them ‘No Choice.’”

By Chris Geidner
April 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Same sex marriage case

“Filing what she described as the organization’s ‘first big impact litigation,’ Immigration Equality’s executive director, Rachel Tiven, tells Metro Weekly that the organization was ‘left with no choice but to sue’ the Obama administration today in order to protect what it claims are the constitutional rights of same-sex married couples who are prohibited by the Defense of Marriage Act from receiving equal treatment in the green card application process. As New York Law School professor Arthur Leonard wrote of the case in March, ‘This case thus joins pending DOMA challenges in the First Circuit Court of Appeals and district courts in Connecticut, New York, and California, but may be the first to proceed past a motion to dismiss in the immigration context.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Legal Theory Blog, “Gewirtzman on Lower Court Constitutionalism.”

By Doni Gewirtzman
April 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty Doni Gewirtzman
Subject: Lower Court Constitutionalism

“While federal circuit courts play an essential role in defining what the Constitution means, one would never know it from looking at most constitutional scholarship. The bulk of constitutional theory sees judge-made constitutional law through a distorted lens, one that focuses solely on the Supreme Court with virtually no attention paid to other parts of the judicial hierarchy.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Hartford Courant, “When We Can’t Kill Those Who Deserve to Die.”

By Robert Blecker
April 1, 2012

NYLS Faculty Robert Blecker
Subject: Death penalty

“Once again the politicians think they know better than the people, preparing to abolish capital punishment in the teeth of popular support for the death of those who most deserve it. Ask the people about Joshua Komisarjevsky and Steven Hayes — at least three quarters of Connecticut knows that these depraved and sadistic monsters deserve to die for raping then burning alive the Petit family in 2007. But the majority of Connecticut’s General Assembly and governor would abolish the death penalty, call it “justice” and call it a day.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Democrat and Chronicle, “Expert: Technology Is More Than a Game.”

By James Goodman
March 30, 2012

NYLS Faculty Dan Hunter
Subject: Gamification

“Gamification — the use of game design techniques in non-game settings — is a term that, while not a household word, is gaining popularity in high-tech settings. A leading expert on gamification, Professor Dan Hunter of New York Law School, gave a presentation at Rochester Institute of Technologyon Friday that says a lot of good can come from this use of technology.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Asbury Park Press, “Former Oceanport Resident Heads to Law School.”

March 30, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell
Subject: New NYLS Dean

“Anthony W. Crowell, a former Oceanport resident, has been named dean and president of New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Tech President, “Expert Labs: Putting the ‘Public’ Into Public Policy Wasn’t Easy.”

By Sarah Lai Stirland
March 29, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck
Subject: Expert Labs

“The closing down of an effort known as Expert Labs this month acted as a marker of sorts in the open government movement. At the time, Expert Labs’ Founding Director Anil Dash said that the inspiration behind the project was, in part, New York Law School Beth Noveck’s Peer-to-Patent project. That pioneering experiment sought to improve the patent issuance process by inviting the public to help the patent office reduce its backlog, in particular by assisting with the search for “prior art” that might invalidate a patent application.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Star Ledger, “MF Global Hearing to Probe Finance Officers on Customer Fund Transfers.”

By Ed Beeson
March 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ron Filler
Subject: MF Global

“How much will four words come to haunt Jon Corzine? ‘Per JC’s direct instructions.’ This line, contained in an email that an MF Global finance official sent to explain a $200 million transfer to JPMorgan Chase from an MF Global account containing customer funds, will be a focal point of a congressional hearing today into the futures firm’s collapse.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Ars Technica, “Death of a Data Haven: Cypherpunks, Wikileaks, and the World’s Smallest Nation.”

By James Grimmelmann
March 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: WikiLeaks

“A few weeks ago, Fox News breathlessly reported that the embattled WikiLeaks operation was looking to starta new life under on the sea. WikiLeaks, the article speculated, might try to escape its legal troubles by putting its servers on Sealand, a World War II anti-aircraft platform seven miles off the English coast in the North Sea, a place that calls itself an independent nation. It sounds perfect for WikiLeaks: a friendly, legally unassailable host with an anything-goes attitude.”

To view this article in full, click here.

This news also appeared in Der SpiegelThe VergeLongform/Foreign Policy, Slate, and Discover.

Point of Law, “A Rose or a Tax, By Any Other Name…”“It’s Not About Individual Liberty.”“A Civil Libertarian Defense of the Minimum Coverage Provision.”

By Nadine Strossen
March 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

Nadine Strossen did a week of guest blogging on Point of Law for the week of March 27- April 2.

To read her entries, click below:
“A Rose or a Tax, By Any Other Name…” “It’s Not About Individual Liberty.” 
“A Civil Libertarian Defense of the Minimum Coverage Provision.”

Dallas Voice, “Tonya Parker’s Controversial Marriage Policy Continues to Attract Media Attention, Analysis.”

By Anna Waugh
March 26, 2012

New York Law School’s Legal As She Is Spoke
Subject: Tonya Parker Marriage Policy

“Despite lesbian Dallas County Judge Tonya Parker’s hope that her refusal to marry straight couples until marriage equality is gained in Texas will fade from the public’s attention, her name and stance still frequent headlines. Then, on Friday, a New York Law School blog post analyzed the legality of Parker’s decision, comparing her stance to a New York county clerk’s refusal to issue same-sex marriage licenses last year after marriage equality became law.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Forbes, “Book Review: James F. Simon’s ‘FDR and Chief Justice Hughes.’”

By Michael Bobelian
March 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Book review

“In FDR and Chief Justice Hughes: The President, the Supreme Court and the Epic Battle over the New Deal, James F. Simon provides a moving account of two statesmen whose lives and careers intersected and in many ways paralleled each other as they progressed toward this showdown.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Ars Technica, “Dotcom Says Hollywood Studios Once Courted Megaupload.”

By Timothy B. Lee
March 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Megaupload

“Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom spent the first few weeks after his arrest in prison, with the US governmentarguing that he posed a flight risk. But he was finally released from prison last month, and his wife recentlygave birth to twin daughters. New York Law School professor James Grimmelmann told Ars in January that the government has “a pretty slam-dunk case on inducement.”

To view this article in full, click here.

C-Span, “Washington Journal.”

By David Savage
March 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Anti-Injunction Act

“Guest will explain the Anti-Injunction Act & why it’s the focus of the first day of Supreme Court oral arguments on the health care law. “

To view this article in full, click here.

KCRW- To the Point, “The Supreme Court Takes on Healthcare.”

By Warren Olny
March 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Healthcare

“Led by Florida, 26 states have challenged President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, passed two years ago without the vote of a single Republican. Next week, the US Supreme Court will hearthree days of oral arguments on the case — the first time that’s happened in 45 years.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “Judge Tosses Lawsuit Against Law School over Employment Rates.”

By Joe Palazzolo
March 21, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Employment Rate Lawsuit Dropped

“A New York judge on Wednesday threw out one of the first of more than a dozen lawsuits around the country that accuse law schools of advertising misleading post-graduate employment statistics.”

To view this article in full, click here.

This news also appeared in Bloomberg Business WeekThe National Law Journal, Inside Higher EdCBS NewsThomson ReutersNew York PostABA JournalBloombergHuffington PostThe Chronicle of Higher EducationThe BLTLaw 360The Wall Street JournalAbove the Law, Adjunct Law Prof BlogBrian Leiter’s Law School ReportsLaw Librarian BlogThe Volokh ConspiracyNew York TimesNew York Daily News, New York MagazineJD Journal, NewserThe AM Law DailyThe Daily RecordFind LawThe InquisitrNPRNewsdayInsurance Journal, Campus Progress, and more.

Internet Revolution, “Line Between Privacy & Promotion Still Fuzzy.”

By Steven C. Bennett
March 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty Steven Bennett
Subject: Personal Information

“A recent New York Times Magazine article revealed that a major retailer employed a system of ‘predictive analytics’ to analyze a wealth of information on customers (acquired from in-store purchases, online activities, and for-pay data brokers). The goal was to determine which customers seemed to be pregnant and thus attractive targets for advertisements, coupons, and other strategies aimed at selling to expectant parents.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Today’s Workplace, “N-Word Lesson for Students and for Teacher.”

By Jaclyn Tyndorf
March 19, 2012

New York Law School’s Legal As She is Spoke’s repost
Subject: Racism

‘I still remember my fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Ross, standing in front of me, hand outstretched, a stern expression on her face. Becky had passed me a note and I hadn’t opened it yet, and wasn’t even sure what it said, but there I was, holding the incriminating evidence. I was terrified. I bet this is how one student at Chicago’s Murray Language Academy, felt last October, when he was caught holding a passed note in class. The teacher confiscated the note and read it. As it turned out, the note included rap lyrics with the “N-word.”

To view this article in full, click here.

CQ Roll Call, “Does EPA ‘Sue and Settle’ Muddy the Waters?”

By Lauren Gardner
March 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty: David Schoenbrod
Subject: Handling hazardous waste

“Three days before Christmas 2008, an earthen dam holding back a mountain of coal ash outside a Tennessee power plant burst. The toxic sludge flooded more than 300 acres, contaminating two nearby rivers and starting a debate about whether the federal government should regulate the material as hazardous waste. David Schoenbrod, a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and a New York Law School professor, says he was struck by the power he wielded while negotiating consent decrees in the late 1970s as a Natural Resources Defense Council attorney. He went to court several times to modify an agreement he helped negotiate involving New York state and local governments that were found to be in violation of the Clean Air Act.”

This article is available by subscription only.

Forbes, “Women Lawyers- We’ve Got an App for That.”

By Victoria Pynchon
March 18, 2012

NYLS Student Lynnett Brooks
Subject: Law Without Walls

There’s been a lot of criticism of law schools during the Great Recession. I’ve written about LawWithoutWalls before, a project of the University of Miami School of Law, New York Law School, and the School of Transnational Law, at Peking University. The medium and the message being created by three women LWOW students – Lauren Quattromani, Lynnett Brooks, and Tao Xu – is an app.

To view this article in full, click here.

Poughkeepsie Journal, “Author to Discuss New FDR Book.”

March 17, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Book Review

‘The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum is pleased to present an author talk and book signing with Martin Professor of Constitutional Law and Dean Emeritus at New York Law School James F. Simon about his book, ‘FDR And Chief Justice Hughes: The President, The Supreme Court, And The Epic Battle Over The New Deal.’’

To view this article in full, click here (by subscription only).
This news also appeared in Forbes and Democrat and Chronicle.

CNN, “Will Healthcare Law Pit Obama Vs. Roberts?”

By James S. Simon
March 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Affordable Health Care Act

“Seventy-five years ago last month, FDR proposed his ill-fated court-packing plan that would have allowed him to stack the court with new appointees sympathetic to the New Deal. Will history be repeated this term when the Roberts court decides the constitutional fate of President Obama’s signature legislation, the Affordable Health Care Act?”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “And Now Pitching for the Mets…”

By Chad Bray and Reed Albergotti
March 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty Rebecca RoipheSubject: Bernie Madoff case“In a big-league showdown to save hundreds of millions of dollars and perhaps control of their team, the owners of the New York Mets are calling in an ace: Sandy Koufax. Katz and Wilpon actually knew there was a fraud, only that they ‘ignored these red flags because they were making all this money,’ said Rebecca Roiphe, an associate professor at New York Law School who has studied the legal concept of ‘willful blindness.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

NBC Nightly News, “Guilty.”

March 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty Susan AbrahamSubject: Bullying CaseTo view this video, click here.
This news also appeared in The Star Ledger.

Thomson Reuters, “Rutgers Hate Crime Verdict Sends Anti-Bullying Message.”

By Joseph Ax and Jessica Dye
March 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty Susan AbrahamSubject: Hate crimes“Dharun Ravi’s hate crimes conviction for spying on his roommate’s gay tryst represents a victory for gay rights and anti-bullying advocates – and a warning that such behavior won’t simply be treated as a youthful mistake, legal experts say. But Susan Abraham, a professor at New York Law School, said the evidence showed that Ravi had focused on Clementi’s sexual orientation. ‘The fact that he was clearly chosen, whatever you want to call it – even if you don’t call it hate, don’t call it bias, he was selected because he was gay,’ she said.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The GuardianFirstpost, and NJ Today.

Opinio Juris, “Book Roundtable on Tai-Heng Cheng’s ‘When International Law Works.’”

By Julian Ku
March 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Tai-Heng Cheng
Subject: Book Review

“Opinio Juris is very pleased to host a Roundtable this week on Professor Tai-Heng Cheng’s recent book, When International Law Works: Realistic Idealism After 9/11 and the Global Recession(Oxford University Press). The Roundtable will proceed throughout the week and feature a fascinating and diverse group of discussants.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “Health Care Act Offers Roberts a Signature Case.”

By Adam Liptak
March 11, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Health Care Law

“When Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. takes his usual center seat on the Supreme Court bench on March 26, he will begin presiding over an extraordinary three days of arguments that will determine the fate of President Obama’s sweeping health care law. James F. Simon, a law professor at New York Law School, said the battle over the health care case was reminiscent of the showdown between the Supreme Court and President Franklin D. Roosevelt over the New Deal. Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, who led the court from 1930 to 1941, had much in common with Chief Justice Roberts, said Professor Simon, the author of a new book, ‘FDR and Chief Justice Hughes.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in the Herald Tribune and JD Journal.

Bloomberg, “Viewers Guide 1: Should the Court Decide the Cases Now?”

By Edward Adams
March 11, 2011

NYLS Faculty Nadine Strossen
Subject: Health Care Reform Law Arguments

“All this week, experts on the left and right of the political spectrum will be previewing the issues the lawyers will address in the Supreme Court’s health care reform law arguments, which will take place March 26-28. First up in our Viewers Guide: New York Law School Professor Nadine Strossen walks Bloomberg Law host Spencer Mazyck through the arguments over whether the health care cases are even ripe for review by the High Court.”

To view this article in full, click here.

C-Span Book TV, “FDR and Chief Justice Hughes: The President, The Supreme Court, and the Epic Battle Over the New Deal.”

March 10-11, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Book Review

“James Simon, law professor and dean emeritus at New York Law School, recounts the confrontations between President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Evan Hughes.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Today’s Workplace, “Starbucks Served Venti-Sized Discrimination Law Suit.”

By Leah Braukman
March 8, 2012

New York Law School’s Legal As She is Spoke repost
Subject: Discrimination

“Twenty-five year old Eli Pierre has only one full arm, but he says he’s never been told there was something he couldn’t do. That is, until last month, when a San Diego, California Starbucks interviewed and then refused to hire him. Mr. Pierre is now suing the Seattle-based company inCalifornia state court alleging discrimination and wrongful failure to hire “despite his capable work history,” in violation of California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act (FEHA).”

To view this article in full, click here.

Library Journal, “Author’s Guild Seeks Partial Judgment on Hathi Trust’s Fair Use.”

By Meredith Schwartz
March 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Hathi Trust book digitization

“In the ongoing litigation between the Hathi Trust and the Author’s Guild over the Trust’s book digitization in partnership with Google, the Guild filed for partial judgment on the pleadings on February 28. James Grimmelmann, associate professor, New York Law School said in his blog, ‘The only way the Authors Guild can get around the enormously high factual burden facing it at this procedural stage is to make a purely legal argument: that failure to comply with Section 108 categorically prevents reliance on fair use, across the board, no factual questions asked. But here, even its own sources betray it.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Huffington Post, “Corporations in a Lorax State.”

By Tamara Belinfanti
March 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty Tamara Belinfanti
Subject: The Lorax

“Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax debuted to much fanfare last Friday, raking in a cool $70.7 million at the box office this weekend. The genius of The Lorax is that Seuss was able to weave an enchanting children’s tale of resource mismanagement as told through the dialogue of the two main characters — the adorable Lorax and the “dirty old” Once-ler. Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax is most commonly described as being a story about the preservation of the environment.”

To view this article in full, click here.

International Financial Law Review, “Alternatives to the LSOC model Explained.”

By Ryan Bolger
March 6, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ronald Filler
Subject: LSOC Model

“Implementation of the legally separated but operationally comingled (LSOC) model for protection of consumer collateral is far from a sure thing in the futures market.”

To view this article by subscription only, click here.

FIA Special Report, “CFTC Hosts Two-Day Roundtable Discussion on Customer Protections.”

March 6, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ronald Filler
Subject: CFTC Discussion

“The Commodity Futures Trading Commission hosted a two-day staff roundtable on Feb. 29 and March 1 focusing on a range of topics related to customer collateral protections. Ron Filler of the New York Law School warned that if the LSOC model were applied to the futures market, net capital requirements for FCMs must be changed. ‘If we start applying this to the futures world, there is not enough capital among the FCM community today,’ Filler said.”

Available by subscription only.

Advanced Trading, “Regulators Contemplate Slamming the Breaks on High-Frequency Trading.”

By Phil Albinus
March 5, 2012

New York Law School’s Center on Financial Services Law Welcomes Scott O’Malia
Subject: Electronic trading

“Regulators including the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission are struggling to keep up with and keep a grip on this warp-speed world — and they are considering some severe measures as they struggle to understand just what high-frequency trading is. In a speech in February at New York Law School, CFTC commissioner Scott O’Malia admitted that his agency has failed to keep pace with the rapid evolution of trading technology.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Daily Beast, “Bunny Ears Get An Upgrade.”

March 5, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Aereo

“Just as Netflix has forced cable networks and service providers to adopt a more expansive TV Everywhere approach to content, Aereo could help force the same sort of disruption in the broadcast space. Grimmelmann told us that the case is likely to hinge on a 2008 ruling that is emerging as a legal foundation for a number of innovative new business models.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Daily News, “Sandra Fluke May File Lawsuit.”

By Nina Mandell
March 3, 2012

New York Law School’s Sydney Shainwald Lecture
Subject: Sandra Fluke Lawsuit

“The Georgetown law student branded a “slut” by Rush Limbaugh may file a lawsuit against the conservative shock jock as he revs up his criticism against the woman who found herself at the center of the contraception coverage debate. The possibility of a lawsuit, according to the Daily Beast, was first floated by Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) on Friday during a speech at New York Law School.”

To view this article, click here.
This news also appeared in New York PolitickerPoliticoThe Daily BeastNew York Politicker, and New York Law Journal.

Ars Technica, “Broadcasters Don’t Like ‘Tiny Antennas,’ Sue TV Streaming Startup.”

By Timothy B. Lee
March 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Streaming Television

“A coalition of major broadcasters has sued Aereo, a well-funded startup that hopes to offer New York residents television broadcasts streamed over the Internet. Ars Technica asked Jimes Grimmelmann, a copyright scholar at New York Law School, to evaluate the case.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The Daily Beast.

American Banker, “Back to Futures.”

By Heather Landy
March 1, 2012

New York Law School’s Center on Financial Services Law Welcomes Scott O’Malia
Subject: Scott O’Malia lecture

“On the day that customer claims against MF Global were due to the trustee overseeing the brokerage’s liquidation, Scott O’Malia had some rather harsh words for the U.S. Commodities Futures Trading Commission. In a well-attended lecture at New York Law School, O’Malia said it was regrettable that Congress had never granted the CFTC the authority to declare trading firms insolvent (in MF Global’s case, this task was handled by the Securities Investor Protection Corp.)

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Advanced Trading.

Daily News, “’Alarming’ Number of Lawsuits Against Brookdale.”

By Conor Febos & Lore Croghan
March 1, 2012

NYLS Faculty Joanne Doroshow
Subject: Brookdale Hospital Lawsuits

“Brookdale University Hospital and Medical Center is the target of more than 100 open lawsuits by patients who claim they — or their dead relatives — were harmed instead of healed, Brooklyn Supreme Court records show. ‘It sounds like there’s an epidemic of medical malpractice at this hospital,’ said Joanne Doroshow, executive director of the Center for Justice and Democracy at New York Law School, who called the volume of suits ‘egregious.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Fierce Healthcare.

The National Law Journal, “Veteran Political Hand to lead New York Law School.”

By Karen Sloan
February 29, 2012

NYLS Dean Anthony Crowell
Subject: New Dean and President

“New York Law School on Feb. 29 named Anthony Crowell, counselor to New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, as its next dean and president. Crowell is no stranger to the law school; he has taught a course on New York City law as an adjunct professor since 2003.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in the The Wall Street JournalThe New York Times City RoomCrain’s New York BusinessDigital Journal, Web NewswireThe Chief Leader, Tribeca CitizenBrian Leiter’s Law School ReportsThe Faculty Lounge, New York Law Journal, New York City Bar and The Associated Press (Picked up by the Wall Street Journal and some 30 outlets in various states): Beaumont Enterprise (Texas), Big News Network , Buffalo News, Connecticut Post, Coshocton Tribune (Ohio), Courier Post (New Jersey), Daily Journal (Indiana), Dallas News, Fox 44 (Vermont), Green Bay Press (Wisconsin), Greenfield Daily Reporter (Indiana), Greenwich Time, Herald Globe (Vermont), Herald Times (Wisconsin), HTR News, I4U News, Marion Star (Ohio), Marshfield News Journal (Ohio), My San Antonio, New Jersey Herald, News 10 (Albany), Newstimes.com, NOLA.com (New Orleans), Post Crescent (Wisconsin), Poughkeepsie Journal, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, Sheboygan Press (Wisconsin), St. Cloud Times (Minnesota), Stamford Advocate, Stevens Point Journal (Wisconsin), Syracuse.com, The Northwestern (Wisconsin), The Republic (Indiana), Wausau Daily Herald (Wisconsin), WCAX (Vermont), WFTV (Florida), WHIO TV (Ohio), Wisconsin Rapids Tribune, WJACTV (PA), WTOV 9 (Ohio).

The Guardian, “The End of Online Piracy?”

By Charles Arthur
February 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Online Piracy

“If you use a smartphone and download apps, as half the UK population does now, you’ve probably used an app which pops up a dialog box pop asking ‘Find your friends?’ and offering to search some new social network – or one of the more familiar ones – for people you already know. ‘Between the Path debacle and Google’s Safari cookies, [Silicon] Valley’s moral bankruptcy on privacy was made obvious,’ commented James Grimmelmann, an associate professor at New York Law School, on Twitter.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in TMC.netThe HinduThe AgeThe Sydney Morning Herald, and Taipei Times.

Media Post News, “YouTube, Justin.tv Sued for Displaying Boxing Match.”

By Wendy Davis
February 28, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Illegal broadcast

“Streaming service Justin.tv and video-sharing site YouTube were sued this week by Ark Promotions for allegedly displaying a pay-per-view boxing match between Evander Holyfield and Sherman Williams. But Ark likely will face an uphill battle, says New York Law School professor James Grimmelmann. ‘The complaint seems weak,’ he says, adding that the Digital Millennium Copyright Act’s safe harbor provisions appear to give YouTube and Justin.tv a defense to the copyright infringement allegations.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Post Chronicle, “Tyler Clementi Case Suicide (VIDEO) Dahrun Ravi Trial Begins.”

February 26, 2012

NYLS Faculty Susan Abraham
Subject: Bullying

“A New Jersey judge this week dismissed 57 potential jurors in the case of a university student accused of spying on gay roommate, leading to his suicide. The trial, which is expected to last four weeks, is expected to expose the uncertainty of the justice system when dealing with what Susan Abraham, a New York law school and former New Jersey prosecutor, called ‘this kind of emotional bullying. Should it be treated in criminal courts, or some other way? The problem with criminalizing these postings and the things young people do on the Internet is a lot of them don’t know what the rules are. Maybe they should.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Today’s Workplace, “Ex-NFL Player Can’t Score Medical Records.”

By Steven Ward
February 24, 2012

NYLS Legal As She Is Spoke Repost
Subject: Right to access medical records

“Anyone who watches NFL games each week is witness to organized warfare, with players delivering excruciating and merciless blows to the opposition. To deal with the frequent injuries, players are often given a shot of the painkiller Toradol, known medically as Ketorolac, before games.”

To view this article in full, click here.

National Futures Association, “NFA’s Board of Directors Elects Christopher Hehmeyer to Serve as Chairman.”

February 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ronald H. Filler
Subject: Elected public directors

“The Board of Directors of National Futures Association (NFA) has elected Christopher K. Hehmeyer, Non-Executive Chairman at Penson Futures, to serve a one-year term as Chairman. In addition, the Board re-elected the following individuals to serve two-year terms as public directors: Ronald H. Filler, Professor of Law and Director of the Center on Financial Services Law at New York Law School…”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Futures.

Foreign Affairs, “Humanity’s Law.” Reviewed

By G. John Ikenberry
February 22, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: Book Review

“The human rights revolution of the last half century has begun to redefine the world’s understanding of the relationships among individuals, the state, and violence. This masterful treatise by Teitel, a law professor at New York Law School, offers one of the best explanations yet of the complex, shifting normative foundations of international law.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The National Jurist, “Tuition Three Times Faster than Inflation, but Some Schools Buck the Trend.”

February 22, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Tuition

“Tuition for private law schools grew from an average of $21,790 in 2000 to $37,702 in 2010, an increase of 73 percent. New York Law School, the University of Illinois, and Mississippi College of Law in Jackson offer a flat rate, where the tuition does not increase for a student after they enroll.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in JD Journal.

The Star Ledger, “Tyler Clementi Case to Ask: Are Bullies Criminals?”

By Star-Ledger Staff
February 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty Susan Abraham
Subject: Bullying

“In the 17 months since Tyler Clementi jumped to his death off the George Washington Bridge on a September night, his roommate, Dharun Ravi, has been the focus of an emotional national debate on bullying and cybercrime. ‘Usually this kind of charge is associated with an assault or murder or some kind of violence where it’s much more clear that you’re trying to hurt somebody, physically,’ said Susan Abraham, a New York Law School professor and a former New Jersey public defender. ‘I think that’s part of the controversy. Maybe a hate crime isn’t appropriate, maybe it’s more anti-bullying.’”

To view this article, click here.

Ars Technica, “Is Megaupload ‘a lot less guilty than you think?’”

By Timothy B. Lee
February 16, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Megaupload

‘Is Megaupload doomed? Last month, we talked to three legal scholars who suggested that the shuttered file locker was probably in trouble. While the University of Virginia’s Chris Sprigman thought Megaupload’s principals had a fighting chance of being acquitted, James Grimmelmann of New York Law School argued that the government had a strong case—perhaps even a ‘slam dunk.’”

To view this article in full, click here.

Bloomberg Business Week, “Dondero Still Slays Bears at Highland with New Leveraged Loans.”

Editors Stryker McGuire & Jonathan Neumann
February 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty Houman Shadab
Subject: James Dondero

“Even in an industry full of risk takers, James Dondero stands out. ‘The CLO market was well governed before the financial crisis, and that is why it performed relatively well,’ says Houman Shadab, an associate professor of law at New York Law School.”

City & State, “Ray Kelly is Key to Keeping NYPD Clean, Knapp Commission Counsel Michael Armstrong Says.”

By Adam Lisberg
February 10, 2012

NYLS Center for New York City Law
Subject: Ray Kelly

“The best defense against systematic police corruption in New York City is strong leadership, and that’s exactly what the NYPD has in Commissioner Ray Kelly, the head of the Mayor’s Commission to Combat Police Corruption said Friday. ‘In good times, when you have a good police commissioner, when you’ve got a vigorous Internal Affairs Bureau, you don’t have the highly-publicized corruption areas that cry out for investigation,’ Armstrong told a breakfast discussion sponsored by the Center for New York City Law at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Inside EPA Weekly Report, “Critics Warn House Bills Could Undermine Consent Decree on EPA Rules.”

By Bobby McMahon
February 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty David Schoenbrod
Subject: Consent decrees

“House lawmakers are pushing bills to overhaul the process for EPA and other agencies to enter into consent decrees to resolve challenges to rules by claiming the legislation will make it easier to revise or scrap decrees, but some Dem-ocrats and other critics say the efforts could undermine the decrees that ensure agencies, states and others follow environmental laws.”

This article is available by subscription only.

Tucson Citizen, “”Recommended Non-Fiction: FDR and the Supreme Court, Our Medical Care Mess, Inside Apple, and Modern Manners.”

By Larry Cox
February 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Book Review

“FDR and Chief Justice Hughes: The President, the Supreme Court, and the Epic Battle Over the New Deal by James F. Simon (Simon & Schuster, $28) Within days of Franklin Roosevelt’s inauguration as president in 1933, he began pushing through his New Deal programs in an attempt to get the nation moving again. During the first hundred days, Roosevelt sent fifteen pieces of legislation to Congress, each becoming law. The quick action reflected not only the desperation of the times but an astonishing spirit of cooperation between the new president and Congress.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Christian Science Monitor, “FDR and Chief Justice hughes.”

By Terry Harte
February 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Simon
Subject: Book Review

“One of the central subplots in the history of the New Deal is the relationship between President Roosevelt and the Supreme Court. In FDR and Chief Justice Hughes, James F. Simon, a professor at New York Law School who has written a number of well-received books about the history of the Supreme Court, focuses on the events that lead to this epic conflict and its aftermath.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in The Journal News.

The Michelangelo Signorile Show on Sirius Radio XMLQ 108

February 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: Proposition 8

Interview discussing the Proposition 8 ruling in the 9th Circuit.

This interview is not available online.

Salon, “The Making of Gay Marriage’s Top Foe.”

By Mark Oppenheimer
February 8, 2012

NYLS Faculty Faith Stevelman
Subject: Maggie Gallagher

“In September 1978, Yale freshmen would not have voted Maggie Gallagher the member of the Class of 1982 most likely to get pregnant before graduation. Another freshman suitemate, Faith Stevelman, now a professor at New York Law School, remembers Gallagher as intellectually provocative — ‘She was introducing me to ideas nobody else would introduce me to’ — but a bit of a killjoy. ‘I think she was somewhat socially immature.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also ran in AlterNet.

KPFK Los Angeles

February 5, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: Book discussion

Ruti Teitel was featured on KPFK Los Angeles to discuss her book, Humanity’s Law.

This interview not available online.

Kotaku, “A defense of Video Game Cloning.”

By Kirk Hamilton
February 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Video Game Copyright

“There have been a lot of stories about game-cloning flying around lately, from Zynga’s cloning of Nimblebit’s popular iOS game Tiny Tower to Spry Fox’s lawsuit against 6waves for cloning Triple Town. Warren speaks on the matter with James Grimmelmann, an associate professor at New York Law School. Grimmelmann points out that games are difficult to copyright, since they exist on so many different levels of expression.”

To view this article, click here.

The New York Times, “On Keeping Church and Schools Separate.”

By Udi Ofer
February 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty Udi Ofer
Subject: Religion in Schools

“The United States Supreme Court refused in December to intervene in a 16-year legal battle against New York City’s prohibition on the use of schools for religious worship services. Some 160 religious congregations, almost all Christian denominations, now have until Feb. 12 to stop using schools as houses of worship. They won’t go quietly and have enlisted the help of state and city lawmakers.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Bloomberg, “’Little Child’ CFTC Ignores Futures Oversight Role, O’Malia Says.”

By Silla Brush
January 31, 2012

NYLS Financial Services Law
Subject: The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission

“The U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission is fixating childishly over Dodd-Frank Act rules while ignoring its traditional responsibility for overseeing futures markets, Commissioner Scott O’Malia said today. “The commission has acted like a little child, abandoning the old toy and ‘swapping’ them out for the new,” O’Malia, one of two Republicans on the five-member panel, said in remarks prepared for a conference at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in FinextraaiCIOHigh Frequency Traders, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Post, and Futures Magazine.

National Journal, “As Chief Technology Officer Leaves White House, Industry Looks for Signals.”

By Josh Smith
January 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Simone Noveck
Subject: Obama’s Chief Technology Officer

‘When President Obama appointed Aneesh Chopra as the first federal chief technology officer in 2009, it was seen as the beginning of a new era in the government’s relationship with technology. When Obama became president, rumors had him naming Google’s Eric Schmidt; Vint Cerf, Google’s chief Internet evangelist; Cisco Systems CTO Padmasree Warrior; Beth Simone Noveck, a law professor at New York Law School; or Vivek Kundra, who became the White House’s chief information officer, among others.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also ran in Nextgov.

Thomson Reuters, “Civil Rights Law on Supreme Court’s Mind.”

By Rebecca Hamilton
January 27, 2012

NYLS Faculty Deborah Archer
Subject: Voting Rights Act

“A recent decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that dealt with a narrow issue in a redistricting case from Texas suggests that the nation’s top court is ready to reconsider a key part of the Voting Rights Act, a major piece of civil rights legislation. “Whatever the ruling is, I think the losing party will seek certification from the Supreme Court,” said Deborah Archer, a law professor and Director of the Racial Justice Project at the New York Law School, which filed an amicus brief in support of the U.S. government position in the Alabama case.”

The Wall Street Journal, “MF Customers Face Long, and Possibly Fruitless, Slog.”

By Jamila Trindle
January 24, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ronald Filler
Subject: MF Global Holdings

“Customers of failed futures firm MF Global Holdings Ltd. could be in for a long courtroom battle and—even after all is argued and litigated—still might not get all their money back.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Ars Technica, “Megaboned? Long Odds Against Legal Success, Say Law Profs.”

By Timothy B. Lee
January 24, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Megaupload

“On Thursday, the US government unsealed a 72-page indictment against Megaupload. The file locker was one of the largest sites on the Web, and major copyright holders had accused it of facilitating widespread copyright infringement. To help us understand the legal issues in the Megaupload case, Ars Technica spoke with three law professors: James Grimmelmann at New York Law School, Michael Carrier at Rutgers-Camden, and Chris Sprigman at the University of Virginia.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Wall Street Journal, “The Daily Writing Sample: Morrison v. National Australia Bank.”

By Joe Palazzolo
January 24, 2012

NYLS Legal As She Is Spoke Blog
Subject: Racketeering and Copyright Counts

“Why dig out Morrison for today’s Writing Sample? The racketeering and copyright counts could be exposed by Morrison, according to Frankel, who credits the New York Law School blog Legal As She Is Spoke with raising the issue here..”

To view this article in full, click here. 

Tech President, “White House Launches www.Education.Data.Gov.”

By Miranda Neubauer
January 23, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck
Subject: Data.gov project

“The White House last week announced the launch of www.education.data.gov as part of the overall data.gov project. The site seeks to target developers, teachers and students. Professor Beth Noveck at New York Law School oversaw the creation of the Democracy Design Workshop Do Tank, Harvard Business School professor Karim R. Lakhani worked on a case study entitled “Matching Government Data with Rapid Innovation,” while Professor Ines Mergel at Syracuse University incorporated the site in a course on Government 2.0.”

To view this article in full, click here.

O’Reilly Radar, “Massachusetts Open Checkbook: Running Through the Ledger of Choices and Challenges in Open Government.”

By Andy Oram
January 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty Beth Noveck
Subject: Open Checkbook

“On December 5, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick joined with state treasurer Steven Grossman to create an open government initiative with the promising moniker Open Checkbook. I asked Beth Noveck of New York Law School (and formerly the Deputy Chief Technology Officer in the Obama Administration) for a comment. She writes: ‘Open Checkbook is a fabulous exemplar of a government using open data to make itself more transparent to the public.'”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Washington Post, “Does the Megaupload Takedown Prove that SOPA is Necessary?”

By Brad Plumer
January 20, 2012

NYLS Student Asher Hawkins’s post on the Legal as She Is Spoke blog
Subject: Megaupload

“The logic behind Congress’ much-maligned online-piracy bills was that more weapons were needed to go after copyright infringers overseas. But last week, the U.S. government took down Megaupload, one of the biggest file-sharing sites abroad. Doesn’t that suggest new laws aren’t necessary? Update: New York Law School’s Asher Hawkins adds an interesting twist to this debate, wondering whether the Justice Department’s crackdown on Megaupload will hold up in court.”

To view this article in full, click here.

North Jersey, “Opinion: The Turbulent Story of an Epic Ruling.”

By Susan Abraham & Louis Raveson
January 20, 2012

NYLS Faculty Susan Abraham
Subject: Roe v. Wade

“TODAY is the 39th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the United States Supreme Court’s historic opinion holding that women have a constitutional right to obtain an abortion. Of all the constitutional issues that have come before our courts, few have been as intractable, as divisive or as impassioned as those decided there. The issue not only pits personal rights against public policy, but invariably evokes the most intense and deeply held personal beliefs about health, family, religion, privacy, the nature of life and a woman’s control of her own body.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Ars Technica, “Why the Feds Smashed Megaupload.”

By Nate Anderson
January 19, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Megaupload

“The US government dropped a nuclear bomb on “cyberlocker” site Megaupload today, seizing its domain names, grabbing $50 million in assets, and getting New Zealand police to arrest four of the site’s key employees, including enigmatic founder Kim Dotcom. Law professor James Grimmelmann of New York Law School tells Ars, “If proven at trial, there’s easily enough in the indictment to prove criminal copyright infringement many times over. But much of what the indictment details are legitimate business strategies many websites use to increase their traffic and revenues: offering premium subscriptions, running ads, rewarding active users.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in International Business Times.

City Limits, “NY Prisoners Counted Differently, But Still Not Voting.”

By Jeanmarie Evelly
January 17, 2012

NYLS Faculty Erika Wood
Subject: Voting

“Now that they’ll be counted in their hometowns rather than where they’re incarcerated, state inmates could shift district lines. One thing neither they nor parollees can do, however, is vote. “People are still not allowed to vote even though they’re living the in the community, contributing to the community, sending their kids to local schools,”says Erika Wood, an associate professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

NextGov, “The Debate Over What’s Private or Public Online Is Just Warming Up.”

By Jessica Herrera-Flanigan
January 13, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Online Privacy

“On Thursday, the Electronic Privacy Information Center sent a letter to the Federal Trade Commission requesting that the agency investigate Google’s recent announcement to integrate its social network, Google+, into search results. The letter quotes James Grimmelmann, an associate professor at New York Law School, noting that the change ‘breaks down a very clear conceptual divide between things that are private and things that are public online.’”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in ZDNet, Lakestar MediaNetwork World, and The Atlantic Wire.

Thomson Reuters, “Carol Buckler Named Interim Dean of New York Law School.”

By Moira Herbst
January 12, 2012

NYLS Faculty Carol Buckler
Subject: New Interim Dean Announced

“New York Law School announced on Thursday that its board of trustees had named Carol Buckler as interim dean of the law school. Buckler began serving in her new position on Jan. 1 following the departure of Richard Matasar. She will remain interim dean until the school appoints a new dean, the school said in a press release.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in New York Law Journal.

The New York Times, “Google Adds Posts From Its Social Network to Search Results.”

By Claire Cain Miller
January 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Google Search Results

“Google’s popularity was built on its ability to help people find just the right Web pages. “When Google shifts towards just searching itself, and it directs you away from stuff on the rest of the Web and other social networks, people are forced to stay inside the Google ecosystem,” said James Grimmelmann, an associate professor at New York Law School who specializes in Internet law.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also ran in The New York Times Bits, and KSBW News.

The National Law Journal, “Big Law Firms Don’t Care About Your LL.M., Recruiter Warns.”

By Karen Sloan
January 10, 2012

NYLS Faculty Marshall Tracht
Subject: LL.M. Programs

“Does a graduate law degree increase a lawyer’s value on the legal job market? Not according to Steven John, a managing director at legal recruiting firm Major, Lindsey & Africa. The programs were not without their defenders. Several panelists argued that they can help graduates get a leg up in the job market outside the large law firms that Major Lindsey serves. They also can help mid-career attorneys trying to break into new areas of law, or help attorneys enter new geographic markets, said New York Law School professor Marshall Tracht, who runs an LL.M. program in real estate law.”

To view this article in full, click here.
This news also appeared in Above the Law.

SD Times, “What Developers Should Think About as They Build Mobile Apps.”

By Victoria Reitano
January 9, 2012

NYLS Faculty James Grimmelmann
Subject: Mobile Apps

“When creating an application, developers think about user experience, architecture and performance. But what about liability? Most terms of use, which most end users merely click through to get to their new application, provide some form of liability waiver, according to James Grimmelmann, associate professor at New York Law School.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Sun, “Conn. Law Nixing Legitimate Malpractice Lawsuits.”

By Dave Collins
January 8, 2012

NYLS Center for Justice and Democracy
Subject: Malpractice

“After losing a baby because of an incompetent cervix, Patricia Votre thought she was well prepared when she got pregnant again. But the Center for Justice & Democracy recently released a report, echoing previous studies, saying that certificates of merit and other tort reforms have no effect on malpractice insurance rates. The report says rate levels go up and down based on insurance companies’ financial performance and the economy.”

The Christian Science Monitor, “20 Non-Fiction Books to Watch for in 2012.”

By Monitor Staff
January 7, 2012

NYLS Faculty: James F. Simon
Subject: Book Reviews

“New York Law School professor James F. Simon tells the story of the struggle between two fascinating personalities – conservative Supreme Court Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes and the frustrated President Franklin Roosevelt who tried to “pack” the court with appointees more sympathetic to his concerns.”

To view this article in full, click here.

New York Law Journal, “Law School Roundup”

By Laura Haring
January 6, 2012

NYLS Diane Abbey Law Center for Children and Families
Subject: NYWBA Matrimonial Pro Bono Law Project

“New York Law School and the New York Women’s Bar Association last month announced the relaunch of the NYWBA Matrimonial Pro Bono Law Project. The Diane Abbey Law Center for Children and Families at New York Law School, which provides legal assistance to families, will administer the program.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The New York Times, “China’s Speech, and Others.”

By Michael Botein
January 6, 2012

NYSL Faculty: Michael Botein
Subject: China TV

““China TV Grows Racy, and Gets a Chaperon” (“Culture and Control” series, front page, Jan. 1) raises an altogether too-familiar specter of government suppression of “sex talk” programming that unfortunately has striking analogues in the United States. “

To view this article in full, click here.

My West Texas, “MOSC to Present “The Planets” at Wagner Noel.”

By Missy Hallmark
January 3, 2012

NYLS Faculty Arthur Leonard
Subject: “The Planets”

“The first complete public performance of Gustav Holst’s “The Planets” premiered in Queen’s Hall in 1920. New York Law School Professor Arthur S. Leonard described “The Planets” as “a work of sheer genius.”

To view this article in full, click here.

Opinio Juris, “The ICC and Saif: After International Intervention, avoiding Victor’s Justice.”

By Ruti Teitel
January 2, 2012

NYLS Faculty Ruti Teitel
Subject: The ICC and Saif Ghadaffi

“When the United Nations Security Council authorized the use of force to protect civilians in Libya, the Council also referred the situation there to the International Criminal Court (ICC) in the Hague, and placed Libya under a legal obligation to cooperate fully with the ICC.”

To view this article in full, click here.

The Canberra Times, “Let’s Not Go Down the Failed Path of Megan’s law.”

By Astrid Birgden
January 2, 2012

New York Law School
Subject: Megan’s law

“I am a psychologist who has worked with sex offenders and recently I have studied the impact of Megan’s Law through New York Law School.”

National Jurist, “Best Schools for Public Service.”

January 2012

New York Law School
Subject: NYLS listed as one of the best schools for public interest

“We gathered data on every ABA law school in the U.S. from a number of sources, listed below.”

To view this article in full, click here.