In the News

“Andy Crouppen – Brown & Crouppen”

By Missouri Lawyers Weekly
August 21, 2018

NYLS Alumni: Andy Crouppen ’99

Ask for Andy Crouppen’s resume, and he’ll chuckle a bit. There’d be only one entry.

“I think I’d just put Brown & Crouppen on it,” he said, laughing.

Though he’s held other jobs, that entry would make sense. Crouppen has spent a decade and a half with the firm his father Terry Crouppen started with Ron Brown in 1979 and which has since become nearly a household name in local personal-injury law. He was named a partner in 2012. Three years later, he took on his role as managing partner with partner Ed Herman.

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“Not normal case. Experts analyze”

By Yahoo
August 21, 2018

NYLS Faculty: Rebecca Roiphe

Ex-Trump attorney Michael Cohen pleads guilty to campaign finance violations. Former assistant FBI director Ron Hosko and New York Law School professor Rebecca Roiphe join CBSN’s “Red & Blue” to delve deeper into the deal.

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“The Cohen Tapes”

By Legal Talk Network
August 17, 2018

NYLS Faculty: Rebecca Roiphe

Back in 2016, months before the Presidential election, attorney Michael Cohen secretly recorded a conversation with his client, Donald Trump, discussing the payment to a former Playboy model, Karen McDougal, who alleged she had an affair with Trump.

These recordings bring up a myriad of legal issues when it comes to attorneys and their clients, but it also breaches the question—could the content collected from these recordings be a violation of federal campaign finance law? On Lawyer 2 Lawyer, hosts Bob Ambrogi and Craig Williams join attorney and professor Rebecca Roiphe from New York Law School and attorney and professor Bennett Gershman from Pace Law to discuss the Michael Cohen tapes, legal ethics, attorney-client privilege, campaign finance law, the impact of these tapes, and what lies ahead for attorney Cohen and the President.

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“Freezing Out Immigrants: The Denial of Due Process in New York State Courts”

By Queens Daily Eagle
August 17, 2018

NYLS Faculty: Claire Thomas

Frequent raids on immigrant communities and deaths in immigration detention centers have galvanized an “Abolish ICE” movement nationwide.

In part, the movement is informed by the situations in state courthouses, where the presence of U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agents can instill fear in noncitizens and discourage them from seeking legal services they are entitled to or even notifying the police when they are in danger.

At the local level, advocates in New York have sounded the alarm for years on the presence of ICE agents inside New York State Courts. Following the 2016 election, ICE enforcement of civil immigration law in state courthouses increased.

In fact, the Immigrant Defense Project, a New York City-based non-profit, reported that there was a 1200% increase in ICE arrests and attempted arrests in New York State Courts  in 2017.

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“De Blasio’s Charter Revision Commission seeks term limits for Community Boards”

By Brooklyn Daily Eagle
August 17, 2018

NYLS Alumni: Brian Kaszuba '04

Neighborhood community boards are in for major changes if voters approve a series of recommendations made by the mayor’s Charter Revision Commission that stand a good chance of appearing on the ballot in the Nov. 6 election.

In an effort to increase diversity and to add new voices to community boards, the commission is calling for term limits to be imposed on members. Under the proposal, board members would be limited to four consecutive terms with each term lasting two years.

The term limits proposal, along with other possible changes to the City Charter suggested by the commission, would have to be filed with the City Clerk’s office by Sept. 7 if they are to appear on the ballot in November.

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“You’re a Lawyer, but Can You Run a Law Firm?

By Bloomberg Law
August 17, 2018

NYLS Mentioned and NYLS Faculty: Anthony Crowell

The legal-education model of reading countless cases is evolving as law schools add courses in marketing, technology, and problem-solving to equip students for today’s competitive legal climate.

“You have to be an entrepreneur. It’s not enough to be a lawyer,” L.A. attorney Sean Bigley told Bloomberg Law. “My law school gave me an outstanding legal education, but the actual mechanics of running a law firm was the missing piece of the puzzle.”

Law schools are starting to get the message. Some are providing formal business-of-law courses, others are concentrating on legal technology, and still others have programs to help students start their own firms.

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“Trump Trans Military Ban Keeps Catching Flak”

By Gay City News
August 16, 2018

NYLS Faculty: Arthur Leonard

Two federal district judges and a US magistrate judge have issued new rulings — largely adverse to the government — in lawsuits challenging the Trump administration’s policy to ban military service by transgender individuals.

After the San Francisco-based Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals refused to lift Seattle District Judge Marsha Pechman’s preliminary injunction against the policy on July 18, she issued a new ruling on July 27 granting the plaintiffs’ motion to compel discovery and denying the government’s motion for a protective order that would shield President Donald Trump from having to respond to any discovery requests.

The Justice Department immediately announced it would appeal this ruling to the Ninth Circuit. Pechman had previously denied motions for summary judgment in the case, having found that there was a need for discovery before such a ruling could take place.

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“Labor Department Directive Co-Signs Discrimination”

By Gay City News
August 16, 2018

NYLS Faculty: Arthur Leonard

new directive from the US Department of Labor is construing three recent Supreme Court rulings as well as two executive orders from President Donald Trump to allow contractors doing business with the federal government to discriminate based on their religious beliefs.

The August 10 directive, which came from Craig E. Leen, the acting director of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), a Labor Department unit, could undermine the protections based on sexual orientation and gender identity that former President Barack Obama had added to the federal government’s contracting guidelines.

The first court decision Leen cited is Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, the Supreme Court’s June 4 ruling that reversed a lower court decision against a Denver-area baker who refused to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

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“And we know this!: New study confirms Black boys feel less safe in white neighborhoods”

By the Grio
August 15, 2018

NYLS Faculty: Dennis Parker

Another day, another study confirming what so many people in our community already know: Black boys don’t feel safe in predominantly white neighborhoods.

Researchers from the Department of Sociology at Ohio State University conducted the study by giving 506 Black boys between the ages of 11 to 17 smartphones to track their locations every 30 seconds for a week, according to The New York Times.

Participants were asked where they were, who they were with and how safe they felt around Columbus, Ohio, on a scale of 1 to 5. The mini survey took place from 2014 to 2016 with researchers receiving almost 7,400 surveys, the report says.

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“Cuts in Social Security and Medicare are inevitable. Delaying reform will make it worse.”

By USA Today
August 15, 2018

NYLS Faculty: David Schoenbrod

The debate about the presidency of the President Donald Trump distracts us from other important issues. One such issue on August 14, which marked the 83rd birthday of Social Security, is whether its record of paying full benefits will make it to the 100th birthday. When the first Gen Xers retire in the 2030s, they may well be the first  generation to get fleeced.

The Social Security trust fund is currently in deficit yet will receive enough general revenue transfers (financed annually by your taxes) to pay full benefits until 2034. Medicare’s trust fund will go belly up in 2026.

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