In the News

“DA Hopeful, “Ex-Judge Lasak Reversed Over Handling of DA Bias in Jury Selection”

By New York Law Journal
Article Date January 14, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Rebecca Roiphe

New York Law School professor Rebecca Roiphe, herself a former state prosecutor, said issues like Batson challenges are already fraught with sensitive concerns that judges have to carefully confront all the time, and how they’re handled needs to assure all those involved that everyone starts with a level playing field.

“They’re the kinds of issues that, on their own, could call into question not just the legitimacy of a particular prosecution, but of the entire criminal justice system,” she said. “You throw one little extra thing into the story, like the prosecutor is a child of a colleague on the bench, and because it’s so precarious to start with, because these issues by their nature bring up such sensitive questions, that it’s a good example of how what seems like an innocuous thing can sow discord throughout the entire process.”

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in “With Demand for Housing Attorneys at All-Time High, NY Law School Sees New Role for Itself”

By New York Law Journal
Article Date January 14, 2019

NYLS and Andrew Scherer Featured

When the U.S. Supreme Court in Gideon v. Wainwright, 372 U.S. 335, established the right to counsel for criminal defendants in 1963, it wasn’t surprising that lawyers were in demand like never before.

Now, New York City’s Right to Counsel Law is having a similar effect on civil attorneys, and New York Law School wants to play a major role preparing students to be housing attorneys and training managers to supervise them.

The school is about to announce that it’s launching a training program for supervisors at nonprofits that have contracted with the city to provide the lawyers. By concentrating on the managers, law school officials estimate that the program would have an impact on close to 1,000 attorneys over three years.

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“Trans Attorney to Lead LGBTQ Legal Professional Group”

By Gay City News
Article Date January 11, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Arthur Leonard

Kristen Prata Browde, a solo practitioner who specializes in family law and divorce, has been elected the board chair of LeGaL, the LGBT Bar of New York.

Founded in 1978 by Arthur S. Leonard — now a New York Law School professor and Gay City News’ legal correspondent — LeGaL is among the nation’s oldest and largest bar associations in the LGBTQ legal community. Serving the New York metropolitan area, the group works to ensure the full equality of the LGBTQ community and promote the expertise of attorneys from the community.

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“Cohen’s public testimony is a problem for Trump and possibly Mueller too”

By Vice News
Article Date January 11, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Rebecca Roiphe

Former prosecutors said that under most circumstances, sending a witness to testify before Congress is a thing of dread that could complicate ongoing investigations. Especially if Cohen — who is now heading to jail, in part, for already lying to Congress once — says things that don’t line up with what he’s already told Mueller.

“This would be incredibly disturbing to any regular prosecution,” said Rebecca Roiphe, an expert on prosecutorial ethics at New York Law School. “But I think it’s possible Mueller’s not as upset about it as other prosecutors would be. It’s possible Cohen’s never going to be used in a future criminal case against anyone.”

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“The Battle to Block the Ban”

By LeGal LGBT Podcast
Article Date January 11, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Arthur Leonard

Featuring lively discussion of the latest legal news affecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community here and abroad. Interviews with LGBTQ lawyers, policy wonks and activists. Our monthly LGBT Law Notes episode with Prof Art Leonard digs into three of the most important new LGBT civil rights rulings. Eric Lesh, executive director of the LGBT Bar of NY hosts.

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“Can Lawyers Represent Hostile Foreign Governments Charged in the Mueller Probe?”

By New York Law Journal
Article Date January 11, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Rebecca Roiphe

The obvious answer to this question is yes.  Even the most despised client deserves representation.  This is especially true in criminal cases.  The ethical rules make it clear that lawyers are not morally accountable for the actions of their clients.  This is so that even unpopular litigants can find representation.  But the question is more complicated when the client is an individual or entity controlled by a hostile foreign government.

The Mueller investigation has highlighted some of the potential problems for lawyers who choose to represent hostile foreign governments or individuals and entities connected with those governments.

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“Dow Leaves Correction Zone With Gain of 123 Points”

By Barron's
Article Date January 10, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Tamara Belinfanti

If the shutdown were to drag on even longer, it might give companies an opportunity to step in and alleviate some of the pain the general public is facing now, says Tamara Belinfanti, a professor at New York Law School. Companies’ customer bases could expand if they can show they can provide services the government now offers, says Prof. Belinfanti. For example, instead of waiting in long lines at TSA checkpoints, travelers might be more willing to pay for clearance from private airport security companies.

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“Anti-LGBTQ Colorado Baker Wins Round in His Latest Litigation”

By Gay City News
Article Date January 09, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Arthur Leonard

Masterpiece Cakeshop baker Jack Phillips is back in court, this time suing officials of Colorado’s Civil Rights Commission and its Civil Rights Division and the state’s attorney general and governor to try to block the Commission from continuing a case against him for refusing to make a custom-designed cake celebrating the anniversary of a transgender attorney’s transition.

On January 4, Senior US District Judge Wiley Y. Daniel largely rejected a motion by defendants to dismiss the case, although he narrowed its scope somewhat.

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“Appeals Panel Nixes One of the Trans Military Ban Injunctions”

By Gay City News
Article Date January 04, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Arthur Leonard

A unanimous three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled on January 4 that District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly should not have denied a Justice Department motion to dissolve her preliminary injunction against the Trump administra­tion’s transgender military service ban going into effect. Kollar-Kotelly issued that injunction in October 2017.

The court did not issue a formal opinion — instead releasing a “Judgment” that was not designated for publication — but it indicated that “separate opinions” by the judges “will be filed at a later date.”

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“Why Care About the Criminal Justice System?”

By Jewish Learning Center
Article Date January 03, 2019

NYLS Faculty : Robert Blecker

Prof. Robert Blecker of New York Law School, explains why we should care about the criminal justice system.

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