Introduction

International Criminal Law

International Criminal Law

International Criminal Law

This course provides a broad overview of the extensive recent developments in International Criminal Law, commonly referred to as the law of atrocity. These developments began in the early 1990s with the creation of a series of ad hoc tribunals to prosecute mass violence, killings and human rights violations that had taken place in Eastern Europe, the Far East or Africa. The material covers the three major crimes of ICL War Crimes, Crimes Against Humanity and Genocide as well as the major ICL involvements and developments in the U.S. It will highlight the remarkable creation of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the first permanent, forward-looking court with jurisdiction to prosecute international crimes either within or with regard to the nationals of over 120 countries. Small teams of students are asked to investigate and report back to the class with regard to one of the major cases or controversies then in progress. Grading is divided evenly between class participation and a three-hour take-home exam. The open window for taking the exam covers roughly the first half of the exam period. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

This upper-level substantive course provides a broad overview of the recent developments in International Criminal Law. In this class, students are grouped into teams and asked to investigate and report back on one of the major cases/controversies assigned by the professor.

Recommended for the following Professional Pathways: Immigration; International Law/Human Rights; International Business; Law Through a Different Lens – History and Humanities

2 Credits

PROFESSIONAL PATHWAYS

Business and Financial Services

Intellectual Property and Privacy

Government and Public Interest Law

General Practice / Chart Your Path

 

OTHER CRITERIA

Format

Credits

Graduation Requirements

X