Introduction

International Law

This course explores the role of authority in the decision-making processes of the world community, including the constitutive process by which international law is made and applied and public order established.

International Law

International Law

Designed as a basic course in international law, this course explores the role of authority in the decision-making processes of the world community, including the constitutive process by which international law is made and applied and public order established. The course considers formal prescription and effective practice with respect to participants in such processes (nation-states, international governmental organizations, political parties, pressure groups, multinational enterprises, and other private associations and individual-duals); arenas of interaction; bases of power (control over people, resources, institutions); practices (strategies in diplomatic, ideological, economic, and military instruments); outcomes (the allocations of jurisdiction and the performance of the policy functions of intelligence, promoting, prescribing, invoking, applying, appraising, and termination). The course emphasizes principally the many roles of the nation-state in the value-shaping and sharing processes of the world community. This upper-level substantive course provides an overview of international law.

Recommended for the following Professional Pathways: Civil Rights/Civil Liberties; Government/Public Sector; Immigration; International Law/Human Rights; Tech/Privacy; International Business; Law Through a Different Lens – History and Humanities

Note: Students who have taken International Law: Introduction may not take this course.

3 Credits

PROFESSIONAL PATHWAYS

Business and Financial Services

Intellectual Property and Privacy

Government and Public Interest Law

General Practice / Chart Your Path

 

OTHER CRITERIA

Format

Credits

Graduation Requirements

X